Archives

QUOTE FOR MONDAY:

“Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a threat to humans, animals, plants and the environment. It affects us all. This is why this year’s theme calls for collaboration across sectors to preserve the efficacy of these critical medicines. Fighting AMR is a truly global endeavour and must be addressed through a One Health approach.

To curb it effectively, all sectors must join forces and encourage the prudent use of antimicrobials, as well as preventive measures. Strengthening infection prevention and control in health care facilities, farms and food industry premises, ensuring access to vaccines, clean water, sanitation and hygiene, implementing best practices in food and agriculture production, and guaranteeing the sound management of waste and wastewater from key sectors are critical to reducing the need for antimicrobials and minimizing the emergence and transmission of AMR.”

UN environment programme (https://www.unep.org/events/unep-event/world-antimicrobial-awareness-week-2022)

Global Antibiotic Awareness Month

 

In the lead-up to World Antibiotic Awareness Week, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) are together calling for responsible use of antibiotics in humans and animals to reduce the emergence of antibiotic resistance.

Antibiotic resistance is rising to dangerously high levels in all parts of the world and threatening our ability to treat common infectious diseases. Infections affecting people – including pneumonia, tuberculosis, blood poisoning and gonorrhoea – and animals alike are becoming harder, and sometimes impossible, to treat as antibiotics become less effective.

Antibiotics are often overprescribed by physicians and veterinarians and overused by the public. Where they can be bought for human or animal use without a prescription, the emergence and spread of resistance is made worse. Examples of misuse include taking antibiotics for viral infections like colds and flu, and using them as animal growth promoters on farms or in aquaculture.

To tackle these problems, WHO, FAO and OIE are leveraging their expertise and working together in a ‘One Health’ approach to promote best practices to reduce the emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant microbes in both humans and animals.

“Antibiotic resistance is a global crisis that we cannot ignore,” says Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of WHO. “If we don’t tackle this threat with strong, coordinated action, antimicrobial resistance will take us back to a time when people feared common infections and risked their lives from minor surgery.”

“The overuse of antimicrobials blunts their effectiveness, and we must reduce their misuse in food systems,” says José Graziano da Silva, Director-General of FAO. “Antimicrobial veterinary medicines are a crucial tool for animal health and welfare and safe food production, but they are by no means the only tool.”

“Like in human health, veterinary medicine has tremendously progressed thanks to antibiotics. Preserving their efficacy and availability through their responsible use associated with good husbandry and prevention practices, is therefore essential to preserve animal health and welfare,” highlights Dr Monique Eloit, Director-General of OIE.

QUOTE FOR THE WEEKEND:

“Your heart may leap with delight at the electronic gizmo or emerald bracelet that you’ve just unwrapped from under the Christmas tree. But you can’t say the same for that nasty holiday surprise known as the “Merry Christmas coronary” or “Happy Hanukkah heart attack”.

For many years, researchers have been intrigued by a disturbing pattern: Deadly heart attacks increase during the winter holiday season. One study even found distinct spikes around Christmas and New Year’s Day.

We certainly know that there are certain risk factors for coronary artery disease. There’s obviously smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia [high cholesterol], diabetes, lack of exercise, and age.

But we’re also learning that there are certain triggers for cardiovascular events,  including time of the year and seasons. If we can get a true handle on the seasonal variation, we could knock down death from coronary disease.

The holiday season and how it impacts the heart with increasing risk of an MI.

It’s the holiday season—cardiac patients not careful in eating but indulging in junk food may put you at high risk for a bomb to go off in the heart=heart attack.

While colder weather may play a role, studies have shown that the spike in heart events during the holiday season occurs even in It’s no secret that holiday celebrations offer many temptations to overindulge. Many holiday foods are high in saturated fats or sodium. Overindulgence in these foods can increase cholesterol levels or blood pressure, making it more difficult for blood to flow through arteries and upping the chance of a blockage. What you may not know is that eating a heavy holiday meal may affect you even after you’ve pushed away from the table. “Research shows that anyone with coronary-artery disease or high cholesterol has a heightened risk for heart attack for up to one day after eating a heavy meal,” said Mittleman. Mittleman participated in a study, “Heavy Meals May Trigger Heart Attacks,” led by Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, MD, currently the Director of the Cardio-metabolic Program at the Mayo Clinic. This study, which focused on nearly 2,000 former heart attack patients, found that 10 percent of them suffered a coronary within 26 hours of eating a heavy meal.

“People often change their eating habits during the holidays,” said Dr. Anne Riley, a cardiologist at BIDMC. “For those with congestive heart failure [CHF], salty foods can cause fluid retention and high blood pressure, which place added stress on an already weakened heart.”

Your heart may leap with delight on the couch after Thanksgiving or at the electronic gizmo or emerald bracelet that you’ve just unwrapped from under the Christmas tree. But you can’t say the same for that nasty holiday surprise known as the “Happy Thanksgining” or “Merry Christmas coronary” or “Happy Hanukkah heart attack.”

For many years, researchers have been intrigued by a disturbing pattern: Deadly heart attacks increase during the winter holiday season. One study even found distinct spikes around Christmas and New Year’s Day.

Recommended Related to Heart Health

Read Amazing Facts About Heart Health and Heart Disease:

You can feel your heart thudding away every time you put your hand to your chest, but do you have any idea what’s really going on in there or what keeps your heart ticking as it should? WebMD the Magazine asked Richard Krasuski, MD, director of Adult Congenital Heart Disease Services and a staff cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic, to help explain some amazing and little-known facts about the human heart.

“We certainly know that there are certain risk factors for coronary artery disease. There’s obviously smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia [high cholesterol], diabetes, lack of exercise, and age,” says Robert A. Kloner, MD, PhD, a researcher at Good Samaritan Hospital in Los Angeles and a professor at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California.

“But we’re also learning that there are certain triggers for cardiovascular events,” he adds, “including time of the year and seasons. If we can get a true handle on the seasonal variation, we could knock down death from coronary disease.”

Coronary artery disease stems from atherosclerosis, a condition in which fatty plaques narrow the arteries to the heart. When a plaque ruptures, it can trigger a blood clot that leads to a heart attack.

In a national 2004 study published in Circulation, researchers at the University of California, San Diego, and Tufts University School of Medicine examined 53 million U.S. death certificates from 1973 to 2001. They discovered an overall increase of 5% more heart-related deaths during the holiday season. When researchers looked at individual years, they found varying increases in cardiac deaths for every holiday period they studied, except two.

Doctors have long known that cold weather is hard on the heart. Blood vessels constrict, which raises blood pressure. Blood also clots more readily. Frigid temperatures increase strain on the heart, and too much physical exertion can worsen the burden and trigger a heart attack. For example, doctors have treated many patients whose heart attacks followed strenuous snow shoveling.

Not to put a damper on holiday frivolity, but heart attacks increase during winter. For one reason, cold weather is tough on the heart. Blood vessels constrict, which causes blood pressure to rise. Additionally, blood clots more easily. (I’m getting this info, by the way, from the boldface link a sentence or two ago).

“People tend to consume much more fat, salt, sugar, and alcohol during the holiday season,”.   “Also, people tend to be less active due to the cooler weather. Overindulgence of food and alcohol along with inactivity raises the blood pressure and cholesterol levels. These risk factors combined increase your chances of having congestive heart failure, a stroke, or even a heart attack.” says Roberto Wayhs, MD, chief of cardiology at Methodist Charlton Medical Center.

To put a stop to that, or at least decrease your chances, he offers these tips:

Limit foods and beverages that are salty and/or rich. Blood pressure tends to go up the more salt you intake. Rich and sugary foods raise blood sugar levels.

Be consistent in taking your daily medications. You need them at all times of the year to maintain good health.

Get enough sleep. Sleep loss is related to weight gain, which also can affect the heart. Aim for at least seven hours.

Control your stress. “Holiday sadness adds stress,” Wayhs says. “Don’t be afraid to seek professional help if you need it.”

Limit alcohol intake.  “High alcohol intake has been linked to irregular and rapid heartbeats (atrial fibrillation) and congestive heart failure,” says Dr. Wayhs.

Maintain your normal exercise routine. “Don’t place your healthy habits on the back burner,” he says.

If you don’t have time for your usual workouts, try a shorter one.

Oh and, of course, stop smoking. But you knew that already.

 

QUOTE FOR FRIDAY:

“Do not weigh yourself the day after Thanksgiving. The extra sodium and carbs may cause your weight to temporarily jump up 3 pounds. Wait at least 3 days.  If you end up eating a lot more than you planned, don’t beat yourself up. Tell yourself it was one day and get back on track the next day.  If you are in someone’s home for the weekend and are surrounded by leftovers, focus on the healthier ones like turkey and veggies.  If you are really tempted, allow yourself one “treat” a day for the rest of the weekend. Maybe a dessert one day or a portion of stuffing and gravy.  If you are home for the holiday, make sure you plan activities for the day after Thanksgiving as well as the weekend. This will get you out of the house and away from the leftovers.”

Martha  McKittrick – a RN, registered dietitian and a certified diabetes educator.  (http://marthamckittricknutrition.com)

Post Thanksgiving Strategy for the 2 days after gobbling festive food for the turkey holiday and the day after.

post thanksgiving or xmas or NYD 2 

How to stop the eating motion and go back a step back into healthy eating after a parting day or weekend with on top leftovers. Thanks to RN NETWORK.com they have words of wisdom to offer and here they are:

“Turkey, stuffing and pie, oh my! Thanksgiving can be a stressful time for people looking to manage their weight because it is a holiday that:

1) Primarily focuses on food

2) Signifies the start of the holiday season which is full of parties, celebrations and special family meals. And unfortunately, most of these celebrations are not serving huge platters of veggies, grilled chicken, hummus and whole wheat pita with fruit for dessert!

While an all-day eating holiday like Thanksgiving can wreak havoc on otherwise good eating habits, one non-ideal meal (or day) does not lead to pounds of weight gain. The big issue for many is how to deal with the days following Thanksgiving when we have lots of temptations to keep the celebration going on. Friday (all those leftovers) and Saturday (well I’ve already gone overboard so may as well enjoy myself) and Sunday (I’ll start fresh on Monday) and Monday (I wanted to eat better but my coworkers brought in pie/cake and leftovers!) and . . . you get the idea.

To successfully tackle Black Friday, use the following three tactics:

  • Have a “Leftovers” Plan: We tend to run into trouble when we open the fridge the day after Thanksgiving and see tons of tempting foods staring back at us. Creating a way to control leftovers will make sure that we can indulge on our terms, not on our refrigerator’s terms (i.e. I’ve got to eat this pie and half a turkey or it will go bad). The adage still applies, “Out of sight, out of mind, out of stomach.” So if you’re hosting Thanksgiving dinner, send your guests home with care packages containing pie and casseroles.  If you didn’t then send some out to neighbors, close family, bring to work or even to church to homeless.  You can figure it out.
  • Keep Active: Nothing like falling asleep in front of the football game on TV after Thanksgiving dinner to get our weekend started on the less active foot. A great way to help our bodies deal with extra food is to keep our metabolism high throughout the weekend. Consider a bike ride, jog or workout the day after Thanksgiving into this weekend to keep you motivated to continue exercising throughout the entire holiday season. Check out the 1 hour-tip below for another activity that will let you kill two birds (pun intended) with one stone.
  • Preventing “Holiday Mode”: As previously mentioned, most of the issues with Thanksgiving and the holidays are when we let our celebratory meals spill into the next day, and the day after that. Many people have the the day after Thanksgiving  off of work and we often are busy focusing on other activities like holiday shopping so we just go for whatever food is around: usually leftovers or eating out. Being mindful that the food-related Thanksgiving holiday ends on Thursday if not Post day is the first crucial step to setting yourself up for success over the rest of the weekend.Have 1 Minute? Give away unwanted leftovers.Have 5 Minutes? Plan a healthy Black Friday weekend.Have 15 Minutes? Portion your leftovers.Have 60 Minutes? Work out by cleaning up.
  • After breakfast on this weekend, get your workout in while taking care of one of the most dreaded post-Thanksgiving activities by setting aside an hour to do some vigorous cleaning all around the house if not already done. By increasing the intensity of your cleaning (a little bit faster, more elbow grease) you will clean more and burn a few hundred calories per hour.”
  • Sometimes the issue is not about what the leftovers are, but more how much of them are left. Spend some time Thursday night or the night after or this weekend putting the left over thanksgiving food in portion leftovers  for  future balanced meals for Friday and the rest of the weekend so you do not become tempted to take extra-large helpings or only eat lots of your favorite food. Freeze some leftovers too so you can enjoy them throughout the holiday season and not feel pressured to eat them all within a few days.
  • Plan a healthy day of eating for this weekend by writing down what you ate, from breakfast to your after-dinner snack. This will reduce that chance that you miss a meal or become tempted to eat something that is out of your routine. If you normally eat breakfast, do not skip it on Friday. Remember some of the keys to balanced meals: lean protein, complex carbs, plenty of fruits and veggies and healthy fats (avocado, olive oil, nuts, salmon, etc.). Consistency is key: make sure you eat on Friday the same way you ate the month, week and day before Thanksgiving.
  • Create a leftover delegation list with each family or person coming to Thanksgiving and the associated foods you will send them home with. Ask guests to bring their containers with them or make sure you have enough that you don’t mind parting with.

About the author: Jason Machowsky, MS, RD, CSCS is a registered dietitian, certified personal trainer.

What happens to the body after a traditional Thanksgiving meal and more!

We’ve made countless jokes about our “Thanksgiving pants“ and planned belt unbuckling as we prepare to indulge in a big meal on Thursday. And, in case you missed it, we’ve also done our best to calculate the number of calories we might consume if we don’t rein it in a little bit. But what actually happens to your system when you overeat during the holidays?

We asked Dr. Jay Kuemmerle, a gastroenterologist and professor of medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University and Dr. Daniel Hurley, an endocrinologist and consultant in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Metabolism and Nutrition at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester to walk us through how our bodies really handle the feast before us.

“The main difference that relates to Thanksgiving is the volume and constituents of the meal,” says Kuemmerle. “In large part the high fat can lead to feeling very full and slower digestion. This can cause the stomach to expand to a greater degree, which can be uncomfortable.”

Uncomfortable how? Well, as the stomach gets more distended from overeating, the growing pressure is relieved by releasing gas — that means some people will experience acid reflux and the urge to belch. Kuemmerle suggests thinking of the stomach as a balloon: It has some elasticity, but eventually reaches a breaking point and must relieve pressure.

Our bodies have a natural stopping point, but the brain is capable of overriding the stomach’s wishes to stop eating. That’s particularly true during a holiday meal, where variety and abundance are prized.

“There’s some suggestion that a wide variety of food, like at the Thanksgiving meal, tends to increase food intake,” says Hurley. This is often referred to as the “smorgasbord effect,” according to the Columbia University Press.

Thanksgiving differs from other meals mostly in ritual: The holiday prizes tradition over digestive mindfulness, hence the problems with variety and satiety. But in all other ways, the meal looks about the same to your digestive tract. (Which may be a comment on our abundant year-round food supply and not this holiday of abundance).

Below, how digestion works — on Thanksgiving and on all other days:

It turns out the expression “feast your eyes” is pretty dead on. As soon as you sit down at the table, the sight and smell of the food sends a signal to the brain and then down to the stomach to prime your digestive system for the meal, according to Kuemmerle.

That means, at the very first bite, your stomach is primed and ready to go. “When the first bite of food hits the stomach, it’s already revved up: acid and digestive enzymes have been released,” says Kuemmerle. “The stomach starts to expand to accomodate the meal.”

Your mouth plays a role too. “As food is chewed, digestive juice from the salivary glands starts the digestion,” explains Hurley. “The teeth involved in mastication break down the food into protein, carb, fat and then in the stomach, breakdown continues.”

As you eat, your stomach stretches and secretes acid and digestive enzymes to help digest the food. Once you get to a point where your stomach feels full, stretch receptors — a collection of sensory nerves in the stomach — send messages to the brain to tell it that it’s time to stop eating.

Again, this is where your brain can really misguide your body. “When we eat, ghrelin — the hormone that stimulates back to brain to say I’m full or I’m hungry — increases and activates the hunger or satiety centers in the hypothalamus of the brain,” explains Hurley. “But your central nervous system can override the hypothalamus — it’s the same reason we can stay awake, even if our brain is telling us we’re tired.”

Once your body determines fullness, the stomach grinds the food down into two to three millimeter pieces — small enough to fit into the small intestine. As the stomach does this, it begins to contract and reestablish its tone, while pushing the ground up matter and digestive liquid through the pylorus and into the duodenum, which is the upper part of the small intestine.

This process can be slowed, depending on what you ate. “A high fat meal with gravy and butter delays emptying of the stomach because fat is harder to digest,” says Kuemmerle. In other words? Your stomach’s ability to efficiently process its contents may rely on how much butter your Aunt Mable put in those mashed potatoes. This can delay stomach emptying, which is an important step of digestion because the food’s presence in the small intestine signals the release of important enzymes from the pancreas and galbladder. These pancreatic enzymes and bile help to digest carbs and proteins and emulsify fats, breaking the food down into amino acids and simple sugars to be absorbed into the blood stream.

Of note, Hurley explains, our metabolism can actually increase if we eat too much to help with digestion, which requires energy. But don’t get too excited, he says, “it’s not enough to overcome the calories we don’t need — it’s just enough to help us.”

The release of sugar in the blood stream triggers insulin, the hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar. Insulin and another hormone glucagon will store some sugar in the liver as glycogen (some fat is also stored in the liver). Every cell of your body requires glucose and muscles also requires a store of glycogen. What the body doesn’t use for these functions will be sent to fat tissue to be stored as fat — either subcutaneous fat or abdominal visceral fat.

As the digested material hits the end of the small intestine, specific vitamins get absorbed, bile gets reabsorbed and hormonal signals are sent to the brain.

Next, the body performs a really fascinating self-cleaning maneuver: As the matter continues into the colon (where water is reabsorbed and some additional nutrients are absorbed, according to Kuemmerle), the interdigestive period begins. All of the “indigestible material” — the detritus that didn’t make it through the first time — gets pushed through. The pylorus opens widely and the bigger stuff gets swept into the colon. A gallbladder contraction allows the pancreatic duct to get cleaned out. It is, Kuemmerle explains, a form of housekeeping to prep the body for the next meal.

“While the [conscious] brain is involved in chewing and swallowing and ‘starting’ the machinery,” says Kuemmerle. “The vast number of functions occur in the GI tract without us being able to regulate or be aware of it.”

And here you thought you were just sitting on the couch.

QUOTE FOR WEDNESDAY:

“While the holiday season is certainly merry and sentimental, these festive months carry the added risk of holiday weight gain. If you’re looking for ways to cut down on the calories this Thanksgiving, take note of these 10 ways to watch your waistline.
1. Choose Healthy Thanksgiving Dishes
2. Watch Your Alcohol Intake
3. Don’t Forget About Exercising
4. Make Only One Thanksgiving Dessert
5. Eat Before the Main Event-
If you can’t trust yourself and your appetite around a table full of delicious Thanksgiving delicacies, aim to eat an hour or so before the main meal. Eating before Thanksgiving will help you to not pile your plate with too much food as you’ll already been pretty full.
6. Be Social-Aside from being a prerequisite on special family occasions, socializing will help you stay away from the chips, dip and celebratory snacks. Mix and mingle around the room or the table and you’ll find you’ve forgotten all about the temptation to eat the unhealthy snacks on offer.
7. Get Out of the House-Why not troop the whole family out of the house after the big meal? This can be a great adventure if there’s kids involved.
8. Less is More
9. Use a Smaller Plate
10. Avoid the Leftovers”

FITDAY (https://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/10-tips-to-have-a-healthier-thanksgiving.html)

 

Part 2 – How to stay healthy but tasty on Thanksgiving!

 

Slowly Savor

Eating slowly, putting your fork down between bites, and tasting each mouthful is one of the easiest ways to enjoy your meal and feel satisfied with one plate full of food, experts say. Choosing whole grains, fruits, vegetables, broth-based soups, salads, and other foods with lots of water and fiber add to the feeling of fullness.

Spread out the food and fun all day long. At the Finn family Thanksgiving gathering, they schedule dessert after a walk, while watching a movie together.

“We eat midday, and instead of another meal at dinnertime, we continue the feast with dessert a few hours after the main meal,” Finn explains.

Go Easy on Alcohol

Don’t forget those alcohol calories that can add up quickly.

“Have a glass of wine or a wine spritzer and between alcoholic drinks, (or) enjoy sparkling water,” says Diekman. “this way you stay hydrated, limit alcohol calories, and stay sober.”

Be Realistic

The holiday season is a time for celebration. With busy schedules and so many extra temptations, this is a good time to strive for weight maintenance instead of weight loss.

“Shift from a mindset of weight loss to weight maintenance,” says Finn. “You will be ahead of the game if you can avoid gaining any weight over the holidays.”

Everyone looks forward to Thanksgiving for the delicious food (and, of course, the leftovers!). But did you know that the average adult eats approximately 2000-3000 calories at the Thanksgiving meal? Try the following strategies so you still can enjoy your meal more while making it more healthful (and less caloric):

Don’t come to the Thanksgiving table starving! Make sure to have a healthful breakfast and lunch before arriving at dinner. When you are extremely hungry, you eat very fast and tend to overeat.

Fill your plate with salad and veggies first and then leave a small amount of space for higher calorie options like stuffing, mashed potatoes, green bean casserole, etcetera. Don’t deprive yourself of your favorite dishes—think in terms of moderation!

Distance yourself from the hors d’oeuvre table. Munch on fresh fruits and vegetables (preferably organic) instead of high fat appetizers.

Drink plenty of water to keep your body hydrated, many of the foods served on Thanksgiving are high in sodium.

Go skinless…most of the fat is in the turkey skin. Have your turkey breast, leg, or thigh without the skin to trim major calories and fat.  (Have you ever thought of trying a vegetarian Thanksgiving?  It’s a radical concept for many, but it’s a fun way to think creatively in the kitchen about the holiday.)

Eat slowly…put your fork down every few bites and drink water. Your brain will have time to catch up with your stomach and you will find that you are satisfied with less food!

If you are the host, try making healthful alternatives such as steamed green beans with a drizzle of olive oil and almond slivers (instead of green bean casserole) and baked sweet potatoes (instead of baked yams with butter and marshmallows) to decrease calories and fat and increase nutrient density!