Archive | October 2018

QUOTE FOR TUESDAY:

“Candy corn was invented in the 1817 and designed to mimic the appearance of a kernel of corn, but was made from wax, sugar, and corn syrup. The only problem? It really does just taste like wax, sugar, and corn syrup. Candy companies now sell their extra yearly inventory to Third World Countries, who use it to pave roads.”

USA Today

 

QUOTE FOR MONDAY:

“While scientists do not know what exactly causes psoriasis, we do know that the immune system and genetics play major roles in its development.   Usually something triggers psoriasis to flare.  The skin cells in people with psoriasis grow at an abnormal fast rate, which causes the buildup of psoriasis lesions.”

National Psoriasis Foundation

QUOTE FOR THE WEEKEND:

“Spina bifida is a condition that affects the spine and is usually apparent at birth. It is a type of neural tube defect (NTD).”

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

QUOTE FOR FRIDAY:

“The immediate cause of sudden cardiac arrest is usually an abnormality in your heart rhythm (arrhythmia), the result of a problem with your heart’s electrical system.”

MAYO CLINIC

QUOTE FOR THURSDAY:

“Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA)is the leading cause of death in the United States, taking the lives of more than 350,000 people each year. Anyone can experience Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA), including infants, children, teens, young adults and people in their 30s and 40s who have no sign of heart disease, as well as more mature adults.  SCA is not a heart attack.”

stopcardiacarrest.org

SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST AWARENESS MONTH!

Cardiac arrest is the abrupt loss of heart function in a person who may or may not have diagnosed heart disease. The time and mode of death are unexpected. It occurs instantly or shortly after symptoms appear.

Each year, more than 420,000 emergency medical services-assessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States.

No. The term “heart attack” is often mistakenly used to describe cardiac arrest. While a heart attack may cause cardiac arrest and sudden death, the terms don’t mean the same thing. Heart attacks are caused by a blockage that stops blood flow to the heart. A heart attack (or myocardial infarction) refers to death of heart muscle tissue due to the loss of blood supply, not necessarily resulting in the death of the heart attack victim.

Cardiac arrest is caused when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions. In cardiac arrest death results when the heart suddenly stops working properly. This may be caused by abnormal, or irregular, heart rhythms (called arrhythmias). A common arrhythmia in cardiac arrest is ventricular fibrillation (VFib). This is when the heart’s lower chambers suddenly start beating chaotically and don’t pump blood anywhere. Death occurs within minutes after the heart stops. Cardiac arrest may be reversed if CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) is performed and a defibrillator is used to shock the heart and restore a normal heart rhythm within a few minutes.

Heart Attack and Cardiac Arrest

People often use these terms interchangeably, but they are not synonyms. A heart attack is when blood flow to the heart is blocked, and sudden cardiac arrest is when the heart malfunctions and suddenly stops beating unexpectedly. A heart attack is a “circulation” problem and sudden cardiac arrest is an “electrical” problem.

What is a heart attack? A heart attack occurs when a blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished by that artery begins to die. The longer a person goes without treatment, the greater the damage. Symptoms of a heart attack may be immediate and intense. More often, though, symptoms start slowly and persist for hours, days or weeks before a heart attack. Unlike with sudden cardiac arrest, the heart usually does not stop beating during a heart attack. The heart attack symptoms in women can be different than men.  A heart attack actually caused scarring to the heart since it causes damaging to the heart muscle tissue.

What is cardiac arrest? Sudden cardiac arrest occurs suddenly and often without warning. It is triggered by an electrical malfunction in the heart that causes an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia). With its pumping action disrupted, the heart cannot pump blood to the brain, lungs and other organs. Seconds later, a person loses consciousness and has no pulse. Death occurs within minutes if the victim does not receive treatment.

Arrhythmia’s can be:

Premature Ventricular Contractions (PVCs) are below in a normal sinus rhythm (best rhythm to be in) below and if PVCs get more frequent making the rhythm more irregular it can go into a further dysrhythmias , like Ventricular Tachycardia even Ventricular Fibrillation, which could lead into a heart attack or cardiac arrest especially if Ventricular Tachycardia left untreated and especially Ventricular Fibrillation (see rhythms below).

Fast action can save lives. Find out what to do if someone experiences a heart attack or cardiac arrest.  Fast action can save lives.

What to do: Heart Attack Even if you’re not sure it’s a heart attack, don’t wait more than five minutes to call 9-1-1 or your emergency response number. Every minute matters! It’s best to call EMS to get to the emergency room right away. Emergency medical services staff can begin treatment when they arrive — up to an hour sooner than if someone gets to the hospital by car. EMS staff are also trained to revive someone whose heart has stopped. Patients with chest pain who arrive by ambulance usually receive faster treatment at the hospital, too.

What to do: Sudden Cardiac Arrest Cardiac arrest is reversible in most victims if it’s treated within a few minutes. First, call 9-1-1 for emergency medical services. Then get an automated external defibrillator if one is available and use it as soon as it arrives. Begin CPR immediately and continue until professional emergency medical services arrive. If two people are available to help, one should begin CPR immediately while the other calls 9-1-1 and finds an AED.  Learn CPR  you may just save someone one day being at the right place at the right time.

Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death unfortunately – nearly 400,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur annually in the United States. By performing Hands-Only CPR to the beat of the classic disco song “Stayin’ Alive,” you can double or even triple a victim’s chance of survival. Learn the two easy steps to save a life at heart.org/handsonlycpr.

 

 

QUOTE FOR TUESDAY:

“Always put your baby to sleep on his back. Use a pacifier at sleep time. Ury swaddling your child. Have her sleep in a crib in your room. Make sure the crib mattress is firm and tight-fitting.”

PARENTS (wwwParents.com)

How to help in preventing SIDS–safe environment for your baby for the first step!

1. Place your baby on his or her back for all sleep times—for naps and at night. Some parents may be concerned that a baby who sleeps on his or her back will choke if he or she spits up during sleep. However, babies’ anatomy and gag reflex will prevent them from choking while sleeping on their backs.

Babies who sleep on their backs are much less likely to die of SIDS than babies who sleep on their sides or stomachs.

Graphic of mother putting infant in crib that reads safe sleep

Place your baby on the back for all sleep times for naps & at bedtime.

2. Use a firm sleep surface, such as a mattress in a safety-approved crib or bassinet, covered only by a fitted sheet. Some parents might feel like they should place their baby on a soft surface, such as memory foam, to help him or her to be more comfortable while sleeping. However, soft surfaces can increase the risk of sleep-related death. A firm sleep surface helps reduce the risk of SIDS and suffocation.

3. Have the baby share your room, not your bed. Your baby should not sleep in an adult bed, on a couch, or on a chair alone, with you, or with anyone else. Some parents may feel like they should share their bed with their baby to help them feel more connected. However, accidental suffocation, strangulation, and wedging (for example, being stuck between two objects such as a mattress and a wall) can happen when a baby is sleeping in an adult bed or other unsafe sleep surfaces. Room sharing is much safer than bed sharing and may decrease the risk of SIDS by as much as 50%.

4. Keep soft objects, such as pillows and loose bedding out of your baby’s sleep area. Some parents may feel they should add soft objects to their baby’s crib to help keep their baby warm and comfortable while sleeping. However, soft objects and loose bedding, like stuffed toys, sheets, comforters, and blankets, can increase the risk of suffocation and other sleep-related deaths. If you’re worried about your baby getting cold during sleep, you can dress her or him in sleep clothing (like a wearable blanket) to keep your baby warm.

5. Do not allow smoking around your baby. Smoke in the baby’s surroundings is a major risk factor for SIDS. Quitting smoking can be hard, but it is one of the best ways parents and caregivers can protect their health and their baby’s health. For help in quitting, call the quitline at 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669) or visit smokefree.gov.

6. Breastfeed as Long as You Can

Breastfeeding your baby can lower the risk of SIDS by as much as 50%, though experts aren’t sure why. Some think breast milk may protect babies from infections that raise their SIDS risk. Do not drink alcohol if you breastfeed, because that raises your baby’s risk of SIDS. In addition, the simple touch is helpful. Skin-to-skin contact is important for your baby’s development.

 7. Immunize Your Baby

Evidence shows babies who’ve been immunized in accordance with recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the CDC have a 50% reduced risk of SIDS compared with babies who aren’t fully immunized.

8. Consider Using a Pacifier to Put Baby to Sleep 

Putting your baby to sleep with a pacifier may also help prevent SIDS, though researchers aren’t sure why. There are a few tips to follow when using a pacifier:

  1. If you’re breastfeeding, wait until your baby is breastfeeding regularly (at least 1 month old) before starting to use a pacifier. Introducing a pacifier too soon can lead to nipple confusion and cause your baby to prefer the pacifier’s nipple over your own.
  2. Don’t force your baby to take the pacifier if he doesn’t want it.
  3. Put the pacifier in your baby’s mouth when you put him down to sleep, but don’t put it back in his mouth after he falls asleep.
  4. Keep the pacifier clean, and buy a new one if the nipple is damaged.
  5. Don’t coat the pacifier with honey, alcohol, or any other substance.

9. Keep Your Baby From Overheating

Because overheating may raise a baby’s risk of SIDS, dress your infant in light, comfortable clothes for sleeping, and keep the room temperature at a level that’s comfortable for an adult.

If you’re worried about your baby staying warm, dress him in a “onesie,” pajamas that cover arms, legs, hands, and feet, or place him in a “sleep sack” (a wearable blanket). However, don’t use a regular blanket — your baby can get tangled in it or pull the blanket over his face.

10. Steer Clear of Products That Claim to Reduce the Risk of SIDS

It’s best to avoid any product that says it can lower your baby’s risk of SIDS, because they haven’t been proven safe or effective. Cardiac monitors and electronic respirators also haven’t been proven to reduce SIDS risk, so avoid these, too.

11. Don’t Give Honey to an Infant Under 1 Year Old

Because honey can lead to botulism in very young children, never give honey to a child under 1 year old. Botulism and the bacteria that cause it may be linked to SIDS.

Remember, your baby’s health care provider is always available to answer any questions you have about SIDS, SIDS prevention, and keeping your baby warm, happy, and safe.