Archive | November 2017

QUOTE FOR THURSDAY:

” Smoking causes about 90% (or 9 out of 10) of all lung cancer deaths. More women die from lung cancer each year than from breast cancer.  Smoking causes about 80% (or 8 out of 10) of all deaths from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). ”

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

Simple facts with consequences you face if you decide to start or continue smoking.

Through an accurate reference the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who wants to save lives and protect people, support the following:

Smoking is estimated to increase the risk—

    • For coronary heart disease by 2 to 4 times1,6
    • For stroke by 2 to 4 times1
    • Of men developing lung cancer by 25 times1
    • Of women developing lung cancer by 25.7 times1

Smoking causes diminished overall heath, such as self-reported poor health, increased absenteeism from work, and increased health care utilization and cost.

Smokers are at greater risk for diseases that affect the engine of the body=The heart and its branches=The circulatory system (putting a smoker at high risk for cardiovascular disease).

  • Smoking causes stroke and coronary heart disease—the leading causes of death in the United States.
  • Even people who smoke fewer than five cigarettes a day can have early signs of cardiovascular disease.
  • Smoking damages blood vessels and can make them thicken and grow narrower. This makes your heart beat faster and your blood pressure go up. Clots can also form.
  • A heart attack occurs when a clot blocks the blood flow to your heart. When this happens, your heart cannot get enough oxygen causing starvation of food, being oxygen to the heart tissue. This damages the heart muscle, and part of the heart muscle can die, which is what exactly happens with a heart attack where angina (lack of 02 is reversible).
  • A stroke occurs when a clot blocks the blood flow to part of your brain or when a blood vessel in or around your brain bursts causing again starvation of food, being 02, just in a different tissue part. Get it oxygen is the food to all our tissues of the body
  • Blockages caused by smoking can also reduce blood flow to your skin and legs (For example Peripheral Vascular Disease= PVD). Ever see the commercial with a person telling you to stop smoking with fingers surgically removed or limbs, PVD is what occurred to that individual and the person didn’t stop smoking. Due to this behavior what happened the vessels of the individual’s limbs became so narrowed that it cut off oxygenated blood supply to those tissue parts causing ischemia-lack of oxygen, which led to necrosis of the tissue (death) and the part had to be surgi-cally removed. Now that individual can’t walk or grasp things with those limbs that were operated on. Is smoking worth this consequence? I don’t think so, what about you? Just think about it if you still smoke.Smoking can cause lung disease by damaging your airways and the small air sacs (alveoli) found in your lungs. What actually happens to the lung tissue is the pin point openings (alveoli) keeps expanding to a wider opening. The alveoli is responsible of oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange when we inhale and exhale but with the alveoli stretched the exchange of the gases gets poor.
  • Smoking effects the transmission of the body=The Lungs
  • Lung diseases caused by smoking include COPD, which includes emphysema (especially) and chronic bronchitis.
  • Cigarette smoking causes most cases of lung cancer.
  • If you have asthma, tobacco smoke can trigger an attack or make an attack worse.1,2
  • Smokers are 12 to 13 times more likely to die from COPD than nonsmokers.

Smoking can cause cancer in almost every area of the body. If nobody smoked, one of every three cancer deaths in the United States would not happen. Smoking increases risk of dying from cancer and other diseases in cancer patients and survivors.

For those who quit smoking what risks you reduce:

  • Quitting smoking cuts cardiovascular risks. Just 1 year after quitting smoking, your risk for a heart attack drops sharply.2
  • Within 2 to 5 years after quitting smoking, your risk for stroke could fall to about the same as a nonsmoker’s.2
  • If you quit smoking, your risks for cancers of the mouth, throat, esophagus, and bladder drop by half within 5 years.2
  • Ten years after you quit smoking, your risk for lung cancer drops by half.

Again, if you smoke you may want to consider stopping; give it a thought.

 

QUOTE FOR TUESDAY:

Researchers estimate that 20 percent of all cancers diagnosed in the United States, including some of the most deadly types of cancer such as pancreatic cancer, are related to people being overweight or obese, being inactive, and/or eating a poor diet.”

http://cancerprogressreport.org

QUOTE FOR MONDAY:

“New sounds, new images and new expressionism were the aims of most 80s musicians, and they were so successful in their aims that 80s music still sounds fresh and has an influence today.”

impactnottingham.com

QUOTE FOR POST THANKSGIVING DAYS

“Instead of trying crazy diets now, I just live by a few easy rules: I try to stay away from white flour as much as I can – I go for grains and brown rice instead, and I pick lean meats, like chicken or turkey, over red meat most of the time.”
Jenna Ushkowitz   (born April 28, 1986) is an American stage and television actress, singer and writer.

Post Thanksgiving Strategy for the 2 days after gobbling festive food for the turkey holiday and the day after.

post thanksgiving or xmas or NYD 2 

How to stop the eating motion and go back a step back into healthy eating after a parting day or weekend with on top leftovers. Thanks to RN NETWORK.com they have words of wisdom to offer and here they are:

“Turkey, stuffing and pie, oh my! Thanksgiving can be a stressful time for people looking to manage their weight because it is a holiday that:

1) Primarily focuses on food

2) Signifies the start of the holiday season which is full of parties, celebrations and special family meals. And unfortunately, most of these celebrations are not serving huge platters of veggies, grilled chicken, hummus and whole wheat pita with fruit for dessert!

While an all-day eating holiday like Thanksgiving can wreak havoc on otherwise good eating habits, one non-ideal meal (or day) does not lead to pounds of weight gain. The big issue for many is how to deal with the days following Thanksgiving when we have lots of temptations to keep the celebration going on. Friday (all those leftovers) and Saturday (well I’ve already gone overboard so may as well enjoy myself) and Sunday (I’ll start fresh on Monday) and Monday (I wanted to eat better but my coworkers brought in pie/cake and leftovers!) and . . . you get the idea.

To successfully tackle Black Friday, use the following three tactics:

  • Have a “Leftovers” Plan: We tend to run into trouble when we open the fridge the day after Thanksgiving and see tons of tempting foods staring back at us. Creating a way to control leftovers will make sure that we can indulge on our terms, not on our refrigerator’s terms (i.e. I’ve got to eat this pie and half a turkey or it will go bad). The adage still applies, “Out of sight, out of mind, out of stomach.” So if you’re hosting Thanksgiving dinner, send your guests home with care packages containing pie and casseroles.  If you didn’t then send some out to neighbors, close family, bring to work or even to church to homeless.  You can figure it out.
  • Keep Active: Nothing like falling asleep in front of the football game on TV after Thanksgiving dinner to get our weekend started on the less active foot. A great way to help our bodies deal with extra food is to keep our metabolism high throughout the weekend. Consider a bike ride, jog or workout the day after Thanksgiving into this weekend to keep you motivated to continue exercising throughout the entire holiday season. Check out the 1 hour-tip below for another activity that will let you kill two birds (pun intended) with one stone.
  • Preventing “Holiday Mode”: As previously mentioned, most of the issues with Thanksgiving and the holidays are when we let our celebratory meals spill into the next day, and the day after that. Many people have the the day after Thanksgiving  off of work and we often are busy focusing on other activities like holiday shopping so we just go for whatever food is around: usually leftovers or eating out. Being mindful that the food-related Thanksgiving holiday ends on Thursday if not Post day is the first crucial step to setting yourself up for success over the rest of the weekend.Have 1 Minute? Give away unwanted leftovers.Have 5 Minutes? Plan a healthy Black Friday weekend.Have 15 Minutes? Portion your leftovers.Have 60 Minutes? Work out by cleaning up.
  • After breakfast on this weekend, get your workout in while taking care of one of the most dreaded post-Thanksgiving activities by setting aside an hour to do some vigorous cleaning all around the house if not already done. By increasing the intensity of your cleaning (a little bit faster, more elbow grease) you will clean more and burn a few hundred calories per hour.”
  • Sometimes the issue is not about what the leftovers are, but more how much of them are left. Spend some time Thursday night or the night after or this weekend putting the left over thanksgiving food in portion leftovers  for  future balanced meals for Friday and the rest of the weekend so you do not become tempted to take extra-large helpings or only eat lots of your favorite food. Freeze some leftovers too so you can enjoy them throughout the holiday season and not feel pressured to eat them all within a few days.
  • Plan a healthy day of eating for this weekend by writing down what you ate, from breakfast to your after-dinner snack. This will reduce that chance that you miss a meal or become tempted to eat something that is out of your routine. If you normally eat breakfast, do not skip it on Friday. Remember some of the keys to balanced meals: lean protein, complex carbs, plenty of fruits and veggies and healthy fats (avocado, olive oil, nuts, salmon, etc.). Consistency is key: make sure you eat on Friday the same way you ate the month, week and day before Thanksgiving.
  • Create a leftover delegation list with each family or person coming to Thanksgiving and the associated foods you will send them home with. Ask guests to bring their containers with them or make sure you have enough that you don’t mind parting with.

About the author: Jason Machowsky, MS, RD, CSCS is a registered dietitian, certified personal trainer.

QUOTE FOR FRIDAY:

“While a gluttonous yesterday may leave you feeling sluggish and heavy today, the truth is that a handful of simple strategies can help you undo the damage and get back on track fast.”

Health.com

QUOTE FOR WEDNESDAY:

“It’s a slippery slope, my friends. In my book, the menu for “Black Friday” does not look like the one on Thanksgiving Thursday (only made in the microwave instead). Let other people eat the leftover mashed potatoes and gravy, the stuffing and the candied sweet potatoes, while you try my “1,500-Calorie Day-After-Thanksgiving Detox Plan,” which I will share, happily, with you at Eating Well blog.”

eatingwell.com

QUOTE FOR TUESDAY:

“Nutrition experts advise working out on the days before and after Thanksgiving, and, if possible, on the holiday itself. Taking a walk before or after dinner can help shed pounds. One can play a little touch football before sitting down to watch the game.”

ABCnews.go.com