Archive | December 2020

QUOTE FOR WEDNESDAY:

“The safest way to celebrate the new year is to celebrate at home with the people who live with you or virtually with friends and family. Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others.”

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Part II Safety Tips in preparing for New Years Eve!

Ideas to do on New Years Eve if not going out the safest route to go!

1. Do a 1,000 piece puzzle.

2. Start binging a new TV show.

3. Host or go to a game night with less than 10 or better Zume it.

4. Make and then listen to a playlist of all of your favorite songs.

5. Or just do that thing where you play a song just before midnight, so that the best part plays right at 12 a.m. on Jan. 1.

6. Get Chinese or whatever takeout you want and watch Planet Earth 2 or another documentary or whatever you want to watch.

7. Take a nice, long bath with some salts or bubbles by yourself or with your significant other.

8. Although, if you want to start or read a book, now’s also a good time to do it.  Don’t forget your favorite snack and drink as well.

9. Write letters to your friends and or family.

10. Treat it like you would the the last day of any other month, and do…whatever  but be safe for you and others.

If you choose to take the safest route and celebrate solo or only with your own household, Good Housekeeping has loads of fun alternatives, such as making a New Year’s Brunch, decorating your space, scrapbooking your favorite memories from 2020, or getting dressed up as if you’re going to a party. Oprah Magazine suggests experimenting with fun cocktails, hosting a dinner party via Zoom, making a thoughtful resolutions list, or having a solo photoshoot with a DIY festive backdrop.

If all else fails, pour yourself a glass of champagne and watch a livestream of the ball dropping. We’re starting a brand new year here, and we want to ring it in with pride and positivity — not regrets made by unnecessary exposure to the disease. 

In the end, we’d much rather have you nurse a hangover than a pandemic-level virus.

 

 

QUOTE FOR TUESDAY:

“Starting off, rules regarding indoor parties are the same as they have been all year: they’re a bad idea. says that we still need to avoid large parties indoors.  Including this virus doesn’t have any opinions, it doesn’t care if you’re gathering for a holiday; All it’s looking for are pathways to spread itself.”  Dr. Gohil says.

Dr. Gohil – a medical director as well as a professor within the University of California Irvine’s Health System,

Part 1 Safety Tips in preparing for New Years Eve!

Preparing For The Holidays During COVID-19

For many people, the holiday season will look different this year. Often, the last few months of the year are busy with parties and visiting family and friends. But due to COVID-19, things like traveling and gathering in large groups may not be possible.

Many people have lost loved ones and will be missing someone’s presence during the festivities, and even more have lost their jobs and are dealing with financial stress. Others, like healthcare workers, may be working overtime and unable to take as much time off around the holidays as they usually can. It can be hard to cope with these kinds of changes, especially if certain holidays are the only time you see some of your loved ones.

If you live with a mental health condition, you may have an especially difficult time with the uncertainty and the change of plans this year. Many people with mental health conditions find consistency important in their recovery, especially during times of high stress – like both the pandemic and the holiday season. A sudden shift in tradition may have you feeling an extreme loss of control on top of disappointment.

Plan a Sober Ride

Drinking during New Years is not uncommon. But if you do choose to enjoy a cocktail or two, keep yourself and those around you safe by planning for a sober ride. Ask a sober friend or family member to take you home. Take an Uber,  planned ride or even an old fashioned cab if that is your preferred method. You can even take a bus or train depending on where you live and where the party is from. Even in your sober ride, act appropriately so your driver can pay attention to the road. Remember, your driver may be sober, but there’s likely another driver near that is not.

Don’t Drink and Drive:

This first New Year’s safety tip is obvious for a reason. Drinking and driving is not only dangerous to yourself but also everyone else in the vicinity of your vehicle. It should come as no surprise that January 1st has the highest percentage of deaths related to alcohol, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety data. Between 2007 and 2011, 42 percent of all traffic deaths during the holiday were directly caused by alcohol. Keep others from driving while intoxicated by suggesting they use other methods, like an Uber.

Eat Dinner:

This may seem like an odd New Year’s safety tip, but a full stomach is a great way to avoid alcohol poisoning.

Try to consume foods high in protein such as cheese, meat and nuts. These types of food will slow down the absorption of alcohol in the digestive system. This will give the alcohol more time to metabolize in the body resulting in a lower risk of alcohol poisoning. Our liver metabolizes about one alcoholic drink per hour. A good rule of thumb is a 12 oz. beer = 4-5 oz. of wine = 1.5 oz. of hard liquor. By sipping a drink rather than chugging it, your body will have more time to metabolize the alcohol which will result in less of a hangover. Consider ordering an appetizer if you’re out at a restaurant or snack on nuts while drinking at a bar.

Pet Safety:

Nothing frightens pet’s more than sudden loud noises. Extra attention must be given so your pets won’t run away in a panic. Scared, running pets can be hit by cars, cause accidents, and become lost…not to mention, frequently bite people if scarred or threatened.

Wait to Post on Social Media:

Yes, it’s tempting to document your holiday celebrations online with friends and family, but recommended is waiting until you’ve returned home to share. You never know who’s looking at your account and what their intentions may be.

These are five fairly simple New Year’s safety tips that can simply save your life. Don’t let the dangers of New Year’s ruin your celebration. Be prepared, have a good time, and have a happy New Year’s!

Acknowledge What You’ve Lost.

While the holidays are mainly about thankfulness and celebration, this can also be a really hard time of year, even during normal circumstances. If you’re missing a loved one, think of ways to honor them during your festivities. If you’ve lost a job or had to drop out of school, take the time to recognize the challenges that came with that. Even if you haven’t lost anything concrete, we’ve all lost our sense of normalcy this year – it’s okay to grieve that during this time.

Make The Most Of It.

There’s no denying that things will be different this year, but holidays don’t need to be canceled (or even minimized). There will be some things that you can’t do right now, but there are surely some that you can. You can still carve pumpkins, send sweets to your friends and family for Diwali, make your favorite Thanksgiving meal, light the menorah, decorate gingerbread houses, and break out confetti poppers for New Year’s Eve. For the things you can’t do – brainstorm how to adapt them for COVID times. If you’re disappointed about Halloween parties being cancelled, plan a small outdoor gathering, or come up with virtual games to play over Zoom instead. Feeling lonely because you won’t get to see your extended family? Round up your cousins to video chat while preparing Thanksgiving dinner.

Don’t Romanticize Your Typical Holiday Plans.

Remember that while your holiday season may normally be full of excitement and joy, it can also be a time of high stress. Long days of travel, endless to-do lists, and dinners with that one family member you don’t get along with are all part of the holidays too. Even though you may be giving up some of your favorite things about the holidays this year, you’re probably leaving some stressors behind too. You don’t need to be happy about this – sometimes the chaos is part of the fun! – but be careful not to distort the situation and make it seem worse than it really is.

Practice Gratitude.

Gratitude is a major focus this time of year, and while it may seem harder to find things to appreciate, there is still plenty to be thankful for. Make a conscious effort to regularly identify some things that you’re grateful for. It can be something as broad as your health, or something as specific as your favorite song playing on the radio the last time you got in the car. Change is hard, but it isn’t always bad. There are still ways to celebrate the season with your loved ones, even if you must give up some of your favorite traditions. Find creative ways to adapt. Or start new traditions – they may even add more meaning to your holiday season.

If you’re still finding yourself sad, hopeless, or unable to enjoy the holidays this year, you may be struggling with a mental health condition. Look up a online screen to determine what you’re feeling is a sign of something like depression or anxiety rather than holiday stress.

Part II Tomorrow on Wednesday!

QUOTE FOR MONDAY:

“Bursitis is inflammation or irritation of a bursa sac. You have these sacs all over your body. They’re filled with fluid that helps ease rubbing and friction between tissues like bone, muscle, tendons, and skin. Bursitis is common around major joints like your shoulder, elbow, hip, or knee.”

WebMD

BURSITIS!

Common areas you experience the diagnosis:

Shoulder bursae

Elbow bursae

Hip  & Back bursae

Knee Bursae

What bursitis is?

Bursitis (bur-SY-tis) is a painful condition that affects the small, fluid-filled sacs — called bursae (bur-SEE) — that cushion the bones, tendons and muscles near your joints. Bursitis occurs when bursae become inflamed.

The most common locations for bursitis are in the shoulder, elbow and hip. But you can also have bursitis by your knee, heel and the base of your big toe. Bursitis often occurs near joints that perform frequent repetitive motion.

Treatment typically involves resting the affected joint and protecting it from further trauma. In most cases, bursitis pain goes away within a few weeks with proper treatment, but recurrent flare-ups of bursitis are common.

If you have bursitis, the affected joint may experience the following symptoms:

  • Feel achy or stiff
  • Hurt more when you move it or press on it
  • Look swollen and red

When to see a doctor

Consult your doctor if you have:

  • Disabling joint pain
  • Pain for more than one to two weeks
  • Excessive swelling, redness, bruising or a rash in the affected area
  • Sharp or shooting pain, especially when you exercise or exert yourself
  • A fever going to a systemic infection from localized where the bursitis is probably.

The most common causes of bursitis are repetitive motions or positions that irritate the bursae around a joint. Examples include:

  • Throwing a baseball or lifting something over your head repeatedly
  • Leaning on your elbows for long periods
  • Extensive kneeling for tasks such as laying carpet or scrubbing floors
  • Prolonged sitting, particularly on hard surfaces

Other causes include injury or trauma to the affected area, inflammatory arthritis such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, and infection.

Anyone can develop bursitis, but certain factors may increase your risk:

Age. The occurrence of bursitis becomes more common with aging.

Occupations or hobbies. If your work or hobby requires repetitive motion or pressure on particular bursae, your risk of developing bursitis increases. Examples include carpet laying, tile setting, gardening, painting and playing a musical instrument.

Other medical conditions. Certain systemic diseases and conditions — such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout and diabetes — increase your risk of developing bursitis.

Doctors can often diagnose bursitis based on a medical history and physical exam but if further testing needed the M.D. will do the following:

Imaging tests. X-ray images can’t positively establish the diagnosis of bursitis, but they can help to exclude other causes of your discomfort. Ultrasound or MRI may be used if your bursitis can’t easily be diagnosed by a physical exam alone.

Lab tests. Your doctor may perform blood tests or an analysis of fluid from the inflamed bursa to pinpoint the cause of your joint inflammation and pain.

Types of treatment:

Bursitis treatment usually involves conservative measures, such as rest, ice and taking a pain reliever. If conservative measures don’t work, treatment may include:

  • Medication. If the inflammation in your bursa is caused by an infection, your doctor might prescribe an antibiotic.
  • Therapy. Your doctor may recommend physical therapy or exercises to strengthen the muscles in the affected area to ease pain and prevent recurrence.
  • Injections. Your doctor may inject a corticosteroid drug into the bursa to relieve inflammation in your shoulder or hip. This treatment generally brings rapid pain relief and, in many cases, one injection is all you need.
  • Assistive device. Temporary use of a walking cane or other device will help relieve pressure on the affected area.
  • Surgery. Sometimes an inflamed bursa must be surgically drained, but only rarely is surgical removal of the affected bursa necessary.

Measures you can take to relieve the pain of bursitis include:

  • Rest and immobilize the affected area
  • Apply ice to reduce swelling
  • Take an over-the-counter medication, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or naproxen sodium (Aleve, others), to relieve pain and reduce inflammation
  • Cushion your knees if you sleep on your side by placing a small pillow between your legs
  • Avoid elbow pressure by not leaning or placing your weight on your elbows to rise from a lying position or if taking long drives and leaning on the Right elbow or Left elbow on the door or console.

Ways you can prevent Bursitis:

While not all types of bursitis can be prevented, you can reduce your risk and the severity of flare-ups by changing cushioning your areas of where bursitis can take place:

  • Using kneeling pads. Use some type of padding to reduce the pressure on your knees if your job or hobby requires a lot of kneeling.
  • Lifting properly. Bend your knees when you lift. Failing to do so puts extra stress on the bursae in your hips.
  • Wheeling heavy loads. Carrying heavy loads puts stress on the bursae in your shoulders. Use a dolly or a wheeled cart instead.
  • Taking frequent breaks. Alternate repetitive tasks with rest or other activities.
  • Walking around. Try not to sit in one position too long, especially on hard surfaces, because that puts pressure on the bursae in your hips and buttocks.
  • Maintaining a healthy weight. Being overweight places more stress on your joints.
  • Exercising. Strengthening your muscles can help protect your affected joint.
  • Warming up and stretching before strenuous activities to protect your joints from injury.

QUOTE FOR THE WEEKEND:

“Heart and blood vessel disease (also called heart disease) includes numerous problems, many of which are related to a process called atherosclerosis.

Atherosclerosis is a condition that develops when a substance called plaque builds up in the walls of the arteries. This buildup narrows the arteries, making it harder for blood to flow through. If a blood clot forms, it can block the blood flow. This can cause a heart attack or stroke.”

heart.org

The Heart and Cardiac Disease!

 

The heart is a muscular organ in most animals, which pumps blood through the blood vessels of the circulatory system. Blood provides the body with oxygen and nutrients, as well as assists in the removal of metabolic wastes. In humans, the heart is located between the lungs, in the middle compartment of the chest.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD)—including heart disease, stroke, and high blood pressure—is the number 1 killer of women and men in the United States. It is a leading cause of disability, preventing Americans from working and enjoying family activities.1 CVD costs the United States over $300 billion each year, including the cost of health care services, medications, and lost productivity.1
Understanding the Burden of CVD
CVD does not affect all groups of people in the same way. Although the number of preventable deaths has declined in people aged 65 to 74 years, it has remained unchanged in people under age 65. Men are more than twice as likely as women to die from preventable CVD.2
Having a close relative who has heart disease puts you at higher risk for CVD. Health disparities based on geography also exist. During 2007–2009, death rates due to heart disease were the highest in the South and lowest in the West.
Race and ethnicity also affect your risk. Nearly 44% of African American men and 48% of African American women have some form of CVD. And African Americans are more likely than any other racial or ethnic group to have high blood pressure and to develop the condition earlier in life. About 2 in 5 African American adults have high blood pressure, yet fewer than half of them have the condition under control.
Many CVD deaths could have been prevented through healthier habits, healthier living spaces, and better management of conditions like high blood pressure and diabetes.
You can control a number of risk factors for CVD, including:
= Diet
= Physical activity
=Tobacco use
= Obesity
= High blood pressure
= High blood cholesterol
= Diabetes
As you begin your journey to better heart health that can last a lifetime, keep these things in mind:
Try not to become overwhelmed. Every step brings you closer to a healthier heart, and every healthy choice makes a difference!
Partner up. The journey is more fun—and often more successful—when you have company. Ask friends and family to join you.
Don’t get discouraged. You may not be able to take all of the steps at one time. Get a good night’s sleep—also important for a healthy heart—and do what you can tomorrow.
Reward yourself. Find fun things to do to decrease your stress. Round up some colleagues for a lunchtime walk, join a singing group, or have a healthy dinner with your family or friends.