QUOTE FOR FRIDAY:

“Common treatments for stage IV bone cancer: In stage IV bone cancer,surgery is often the recommended course of treatment.Radiation, chemotherapy and targeted therapies may also be recommended.”

Cancer Treatment of America

What allows vital operations to keep the body alive and working – ENZYMES!

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Enzymes are vital for processes to take place in our body without them they couldn’t take place. What are enzymes exactly?  We have an many enzymes in our body from our saliva to our pancrease. Enzymes are specialized proteins that are produced by living cells to catalyze reactions in the body=breakdown.   Protein in the form of an enzyme acts as a catalyst. A catalyst in action brakes down something, any chemical substance affected with the speed of reaction without being permanently altered by the reaction. For a chemical or biochemical reaction to occur, a certain amount of energy is required=the activation energy. Energy can be transformed from one state to another. The role of an enzyme is to decrease the amount of energy needed to start the reaction. Exactly how enzymes lower activation energies is not completely and fully understood but it is known that an enzyme attaches itself to one of the reacting molecules, this is called a substrate complex. Thousands of enzymes exist but each kind can attach ONLY to one kind of substrate. The enzyme molecule must fit exactly with the substrate molecule (just like how pieces in a jigsaw puzzle have to fit in their specific space of the picture). Well, if the substrate and enzyme don’t perfectly match or fit properly no reaction takes place. When they do fit perfectly the substrate molecule can react with other molecules in a synthesis reaction and when completed the enzyme is free to move on elsewhere to connect with another substrate molecule. This whole process takes place quickly. Clearly, enzymes are essential to the body’s overall homeostasis. (In order to lead a healthy life, we need to bring a balance in the way we lead our lifestyle. Homeostasis is nothing but a mechanism which helps the human body maintain a balance between the internal and external environment). Enzymes quickly perform catalyze chemical reactions and they also govern the reactions that occur.  Enzymes are named by adding the suffix “ase” to the name of their substrates. For example there is:

The breaking down of starches = the enzyme that does this function is amylase.  (Know this about amylase, it is present in human saliva where it begins the chemical process of digestion; that starts in our mouth. Foods that contain much starch but little sugar, such as rice and potato, taste slightly sweet as they are chewed because amylase turns some of their starch into sugar in the mouth. The pancreas also makes amylase (alpha amylase) to hydrolyse dietary starch into disaccharides and trisaccharides which are converted by other enzymes to glucose to supply the body with energy. There is even b and y amylases. Ending product on enzymes breaking down starches or carbohydrates gives us one thing only sugar.)

The breaking down of sugars, like sucrose = the enzyme is sucrase. The ending product of the enzyme is it breaks down complex sugars to more simple sugars in the body.

The breaking down of fats (lipids) = the enzyme is lipase. Lipase perform essential roles in the digestion, transport and processing of dietary lipids in most if not all living organisms (example (triglycerides, fats, oils). Most lipases act at a specific position on glycerol backbone of lipid substrate (A1,A2 or A3 in the small intestines). For example, human pancreatic lipase (HPL) is the main enzyme that breaks down dietary fats in the digestive system, converts triglyceride substrates found in ingested oils to monoglycerides and two fatty acids. Know that glycerol is a simple sugar compound. Enzymes deal with breaking down our foods because they take a major role in what we call the process digestion in the human body but notice what the ending result is of mostly every ingredient out of 3 of our food groups, which is SUGAR. It’s because of the food already having some sugar in it but more importantly also the chemical reaction with the enzyme to allow the food to break down into smaller compounds to be utilized in the body=simpler sugar compounds which also plays a part in the entire digestion process.

So know sugar in the body is our fuel for energy but with our digestion process, in how it works is like this: when the body gets a meal within 1 hour digestion starts in the stomach and complete in 6 to 8 hours depending on how large the meal is, especially if 3 large meals a day. The foods if contain starches, fat, lipids they all break down to simple sugars that transfer to the bloodstream and whatever energy the body needs at that point the tissues with cells utilize it but when enough sugar is used and we have excess in the blood we than have the body store the extra sugar that first converts the glucose (active sugar) to glycogen (inactive sugar) in our liver. The liver is only so big and when it reaches its optimal level of storage than the sugar gets stored in our fat tissue = WEIGHT GAIN. This is the problem with people in America not understanding this process. Plus as most people get older from 30 than to 40 years old and every 10 years after that till heaven we put cellulite on the body for 2 major reasons not eating as healthy due to the bikini and speedo fit not being the priority in life but getting the feet up after a hard day’s work is. The other reason is we aren’t as active as when we were 20 or 30 years old and the metabolism naturally slows down unless you’re a Jack la Lanne.

How do we deal with this to prevent obesity? Do what I did go on a 6 small meal diet. Eat a meal every 3 hours with keeping fat, calories/sugar, carbohydrates in proper proportions to prevent excess sugar in the meals to not allow fat storage=weight gain. Of course some exercise or activity daily or every other day helps tone the muscle and not let it flab due to cellulite. Live healthier habits of living not a month, 3 months or 6 months but make it your daily routine with treating yourself to foods you don’t eat daily to maintain a good weight and increase your health status to allow you to live a happier, longer and more exciting life. Dr. Anderson with his book “Dr. A’s Habits of Health” is a great book to check out with so many others and than the network.   You learn how all 4 food groups are divided up in your meals.

Let’s not forget with enzymes they also break proteins down in our body:  The breaking down of proteins=Trypsin Proteins are large biological molecules consisting of one or more chains of amino acids. Proteins perform a vast array of functions within living organisms, including catalyzing metabolic reactions, replicating DNA, responding to stimuli, and transporting molecules from one location to another. Trypsin is a enzyme catalyst, which allows the catalysis of chemical reactions.   The ending product of the break down is amino acids not sugar. Know high on a protein diet continuously for years can hurt the body also.

Enzymes deal with breaking down our foods because they take a major role in what we call the process digestion in the human body. but notice what the ending result is of mostly every ingredient in our 4 food groups is; SUGAR. It because of the food has some sugar in it but also the chemical reaction with the enzyme to allow the food to break down into smaller compounds to be utilized in the body with send through the entire digestion process.

There are risks with eating just high protein diets for long periods of time. You put yourself at risk for: Osteoporosis: Research shows that women who eat high protein diets based on meat have a higher rate of bone density loss than those who don’t. Women who eat meat lose an average of 35% of their bone density by age 65, while women who don’t eat meat lose an average of 18%. In the long run, bone density loss leads to osteoporosis.

Kidneys: A high protein diet puts strain on the kidneys. It is well known that patients with kidney problems suffer from eating a high protein diet which is due to the high amino acids levels.  A high-protein diet may worsen kidney function in people with kidney disease because your body may have trouble eliminating all the waste products of protein metabolism.

However, the risks of using a high-protein diet with carbohydrate restriction for the long term are still being studied. Several health problems may result if a high-protein diet is followed for an extended time:

Some high-protein diets restrict carbohydrate intake so much that they can result in nutritional deficiencies or insufficient fiber, which can cause health problems such as constipation and diverticulitis.

Some high-protein diets promote foods such as red meat and full-fat dairy products, which may increase your risk of heart disease.

If you want to follow a high-protein diet, do so only as a short-term weight-loss aid. Also, choose your protein wisely. Good choices include fish, skinless chicken, lean beef, pork and low-fat dairy products. Choose carbs that are high in fiber, such as whole grains and nutrient-dense vegetables and fruit.

It’s always a good idea to talk with your doctor before starting a weight-loss diet. And that’s especially important in this case if you have kidney disease, diabetes or other chronic health condition.

So if you want to continue on high protein diets longer than 6 months know how to alkalize the body chemicals to decrease the proteins and there are supplements that can do that via the pharmacy or look up even online.

Before changing your diet check with your doctor to make sure its cleared ok by the doctor since he knows your entire medical history.

Many treatments to cancer that spreads to the bone.

Many different treatments can help if your cancer has spread to bone, commonly called bone metastasis. Treatment cannot cure bone metastasis. But it can relieve pain, help prevent complications, and improve your quality of life.

Doctors use two types of treatments for metastatic cancer in the bones. Systemic treatments can reach cancer cells throughout the body. Local treatments directly target the cancer in the bone.

The treatment you get will depend upon:

  • Where your cancer started, and the kind of primary tumor you have
  • Which bones the cancer has invaded
  • The extent of damage to the bones
  • Which types of treatment you already have had
  • Your overall health
 Treating Bone Metastasis
Bisphosphonates

This group of drugs works best in cases where metastasis is weakening the bone.

How it works. You receive bisphosphonates by IV infusion every 3 to 4 weeks. These drugs help with bone metastasis by:

  • Slowing bone damage and reducing the risk of bone fractures
  • Easing bone pain
  • Reducing high levels of calcium in the blood

Possible side effects. The most common ones include:

  • Fatigue
  • Fever
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Anemia
  • Bone or joint pain
A rare and serious side effect is bone death (osteonecrosis) of the jaw. Ask your doctor about precautions to take before beginning this treatment. Osteonecrosis may cause:
  • Jaw bone pain, swelling, or numbness
  • Loss of gum tissue
  • Loose teeth
  • Infection

Another available treatment is denosumab (Xgeva). It’s given by injection and may work as well as or better than bisphosphonates to prevent fractures. But it also can cause osteonecrosis, as well as low calcium levels in the blood.

Radiopharmaceuticals

These drugs contain radioactive elements that target cancer cells. Doctors tend to use this systemic treatment when the metastasis is stimulating new bone growth. This is more common with prostate cancer.

If your cancer has spread to many bones, these drugs may be a better option than standard radiation, which uses a beam to aim radiation at each bone metastasis. However, sometimes doctors combine radiopharmaceuticals and standard radiation.

How it works. The doctor injects a single dose of the drug into a vein. It then travels to the areas of bone with cancer and gives off radiation to kill the cancer. This single dose may be effective against pain for several months. You can receive another treatment later.

Possible side effects. The most common ones include:

  • Infections
  • Bleeding
  • Temporary increase in pain (flare reaction)

Immunotherapy

This systemic treatment helps your immune system spot and more effectively kill cancer cells. Some methods of immunotherapy have been used for a while, and some are still experimental.

How it works. Immunotherapy works in one of two main ways:

  • It boosts your body’s immune system to fight the cancer.
  • It uses a man-made version of proteins to kill cancer cells.

Examples of immunotherapy for cancer include:

  • Cytokines — substances secreted by the immune system that have an effect on other cells
  • Monoclonal antibodies — a class of antibodies made in the lab from a single population of cells
  • Tumor vaccines — vaccines using a substance that prompts the immune system to respond to a tumor

Possible side effects. Side effects vary, depending upon the type of immunotherapy. They may include:

  • Fever and chills
  • Weakness
  • Headache
  • Nausea or diarrhea
  • Rashes
 Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a common systemic treatment for bone metastasis. Your doctor will use a type of chemo that is effective against your primary tumor. So, if you have metastatic lung cancer, for example, your doctor will use drugs that are effective against lung cancer.

How it works. Anti-cancer drugs target and curb cancer growth. In most cases, you take chemo by mouth or through a vein (by IV). This can often shrink the tumors, which will ease your pain and help you feel better.

Possible side effects. Chemo can kill normal cells in addition to cancer cells. The side effects you might have will depend on:

  • The type and amount of drugs you take
  • The length of your treatment

Common side effects of chemotherapy include:

  • Loss of appetite, nausea, or vomiting
  • Hair loss
  • Mouth sores
  • Infection
  • Bleeding or bruising
  • Weakness or fatigue

Your doctor can help you prevent or manage these. Most side effects go away once you stop treatment.

Hormone Therapy

This is another common systemic treatment for cancer that can help with bone mets. Certain hormones, such as estrogen and testosterone, promote the growth of some cancers, such as breast and prostate cancers. Stopping these hormones may reduce bone mets from those cancers.

How it works. There are two main ways to stop the body from making hormones. One is surgery to remove the organs that produce the hormones, such as the ovaries or testicles. More often, doctors prescribe drugs that stop the hormone from being made or block its effect.

Possible side effects. These depend on the specific treatment. Hot flashes are common. Some hormone therapy, such as aromatase inhibitors, may speed up bone loss.

Side effects of hormone therapy for prostate cancer can include:

  • Anemia
  • Weight gain
  • Loss of sex drive

Side effects of hormone therapy for breast cancer can include:

  • Blood clots
  • Uterine cancer

Radiation Therapy

Radiation is a “local treatment” because it does not affect your entire body. It uses high-energy X-rays or particles to destroy or slow the growth of cancer cells in the bone. It helps most if you have only one or two bone metastases. You may receive it alone or combined with other types of treatment.

How it works. A machine focuses a beam of radiation on the bone metastasis. This treatment, called external beam radiation, lasts only a few minutes. You may receive radiation in one large dose or in smaller amounts over several treatments.

Possible side effects. Early, temporary side effects depend on the location being treated, but may include:

  • Fatigue
  • Skin changes
Continue reading below…
 Surgery

Surgery can often help relieve bone metastasis symptoms.

How it works. If a bone is broken, surgery may help relieve pain quickly. Surgery can also help stabilize a weak bone to keep it from breaking. The surgeon may insert:

  • Screws
  • Rods
  • Pins
  • Plates
  • Cages

Possible side effects. These include the usual risks of any surgery, such as infection.

If surgery is not an option, your doctor may use a cast or splint, or inject bone cement to help you move better and relieve pain.

Ablation

With this local treatment, a needle or probe is put into the tumor to destroy it. Though used more often for other types of metastasis, ablation can help if you have a problem with one or two bone tumors.

How it works. Some methods of ablation use chemicals or alcohol to kill the tumor. Two common methods include:

  • Radiofrequency ablation (RFA). A needle delivers an electric current to heat the tumor.
  • Cryoablation. A probe is used to freeze the tumor.

Afterward, the doctor may fill the space created by ablation with bone cement to help stabilize the bone.

Possible side effects. This procedure is generally safe but may cause some temporary soreness, swelling, and bruising.

Nerve End Ablation

This noninvasive procedure uses ultrasound energy and MRI technology to provide pain relief by destroying nerve endings in the area of the tumor. Because there is no incision, and no probe is inserted, the procedure is typically done on an outpatient basis with a local anesthetic rather than general anesthesia. While complications are possible, they are rare.

How it works. A specialist uses MRI scanning to target the specific area to be treated with ultrasound. Then, heat that’s made when ultrasound penetrates the targeted tissue destroys nerve endings in the bone around the tumor. The destruction of nerve endings results in pain relief.

Possible side effects. Possible complications include skin burns and damage to heat-sensitive organs that are next to the treated area.

QUOTE FOR THURSDAY:

“The foods you eat, especially foods high in antioxidants, can help ward off dementia and improve your brain health. As Stony Brook University registered dietitian Stephanie May tells students, choosing colorful fruits and vegetables – and avoiding processed foods – will fuel you for success.”

U.S. Health News

Foods to help keep your memory sharp!

There’s no denying that as we age chronologically, our body ages right along with us. But research is showing that you can increase your chances of maintaining a healthy brain well into your old age if you add these “smart” foods to your daily eating regimen.

Blueberries.

“Brainberries” is what Steven Pratt, MD, author of Superfoods Rx: Fourteen Foods Proven to Change Your Life, calls these tasty fruits. Pratt, who is also on staff at Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., says that in animal studies researchers have found that blueberries help protect the brain from oxidative stress and may reduce the effects of age-related conditions such as

Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. Studies have also shown that diets rich in blueberries significantly improved both the learning capacity and motor skills of aging rats, making them mentally equivalent to much younger rats. Ann Kulze, MD, author of Dr. Ann’s 10-Step Diet: A Simple Plan for Permanent Weight Loss & Lifelong Vitality, recommends adding at least 1 cup of blueberries a day in any form — fresh, frozen, or freeze-dried.

Wild salmon.

Deep-water fish, such as salmon, are rich in omega-3 essential fatty acids, which are essential for brain function, says Kulze. Both she and Pratt recommend wild salmon for its “cleanliness” and the fact that it is in plentiful supply. Omega-3s also contain anti-inflammatory substances. Other oily fish that provide the benefits of omega-3s are sardines and herring, says Kulze; she recommends a 4-ounce serving, two to three times a week.

Nuts and seeds.

Nuts and seeds are good sources of vitamin E, says Pratt, explaining that higher levels of vitamin E correspond with less cognitive decline as you get older. Add an ounce a day of walnuts, hazelnuts, Brazil nuts, filberts, almonds, cashews, peanuts, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, flax seed, and unhydrogenated nut butters such as peanut butter, almond butter, and tahini. Raw or roasted doesn’t matter, although if you’re on a sodium-restricted diet, buy unsalted nuts.

Avocados.

Avocados are almost as good as blueberries in promoting brain health, says Pratt. “I don’t think the avocado gets its due,” agrees Kulze. True, the avocado is a fatty fruit, but, says Kulze, it’s a monounsaturated fat, which contributes to healthy blood flow. “And healthy blood flow means a healthy brain,” she says. Avocados also lower blood pressure, says Pratt, and as hypertension is a risk factor for the decline in cognitive abilities, a lower blood pressure should promote brain health. Avocados are high in calories, however, so Kulze suggests adding just 1/4 to 1/2 of an avocado to one daily meal as a side dish.

Whole grains.

Whole grains, such as oatmeal, whole-grain breads, and brown rice can reduce the risk for heart disease. “Every organ in the body is dependent on blood flow,” says Pratt. “If you promote cardiovascular health, you’re promoting good flow to the organ system, which includes the brain.” While wheat germ is not technically a whole grain, it also goes on Kulze’s “superfoods” list because in addition to fiber, it has vitamin E and some omega-3s. Kulze suggests 1/2 cup of whole-grain cereal, 1 slice of bread two-thee times day, or 2 tablespoons of wheat germ a day.

Beans.

Beans are “under-recognized” and “economical,” says Kulze. They also stabilize glucose (blood sugar) levels. The brain is dependent on glucose for fuel, Kulze explains, and since it can’t store the glucose, it relies on a steady stream of energy — which beans can provide. Any beans will do, says Kulze, but she is especially partial to lentils and black beans and recommends 1/2 cup every day.

Pomegranate juice.

Pomegranate juice (you can eat the fruit itself but with its many tiny seeds, it’s not nearly as convenient) offers potent antioxidant benefits, says Kulze, which protect the brain from the damage of free radicals. “Probably no part of the body is more sensitive to the damage from free radicals as the brain,” says board-certified neurologist David Perlmutter, MD, author of The Better Brain Book. Citrus fruits and colorful vegetables are also high on Perlmutter’s list of “brainy” foods because of their antioxidant properties — “the more colorful the better,” he says. Because pomegranate juice has added sugar (to counteract its natural tartness), you don’t want to go overboard, says Kulze; she recommends approximately 2 ounces a day, diluted with spring water or seltzer.

Freshly brewed tea.

Two to three cups a day of freshly brewed tea — hot or iced — contains a modest amount of caffeine which, when used “judiciously,” says Kulze — can boost brain power by enhancing memory, focus, and mood. Tea also has potent antioxidants, especially the class known as catechines, which promotes healthy blood flow. Bottled or powdered teas don’t do the trick, however, says Kulze. “It has to be freshly brewed.” Tea bags do count, however.

Dark chocolate.

Let’s end with the good stuff and my favorite desert. Dark chocolate has powerful antioxidant properties, contains several natural stimulants, including caffeine, which enhance focus and concentration, and stimulates the production of endorphins, which helps improve mood. One-half ounce to 1 ounce a day will provide all the benefits you need, says Kulze. This is one “superfood” where more is not better. “You have to do this one in moderation,” says Kulze.

Lastly the prevention of diseases that can impact all organs including our brain.  With obesity comes the risk of heart disease, diabetes II, that can lead into further problems down the road with other systems of the human body.  To get on prevention check if your body mass index is in the range it should be and if your not sure check online BMI where it is for free.  If you need assistance with a good diet plan but more importantly knowing how to get in a regular routine of living a healthy life through diet, habits, balancing rest with exercise than you have come to the right site.  For no fee, no donation, no hacking go to healthyusa.tsfl.com and take a peek at what we offer which is at such a reasonable price.  We provide more of a reachable goal for you with having Dr. Anderson through access of his book “Dr. A’s healthy habits” with a personal coach and the foods to eat while your dieting.  If you have any questions or set backs and need to converse with someone that’s what your personal coach is there for; we provide support.  Take a peek go to healthusa.tsfl.com and you may just like what you see.  Join me and so many others in attempting to reach the goal of getting back in the right weight for our height.  I hope to hear from you.

 

QUOTE FOR WEDNESDAY:

“In the United States, the percentage of children and adolescents affected by obesity has more than tripled since the 1970s.1  Data from 2015-2016 show that nearly 1 in 5 school age children and young people (6 to 19 years) in the United States has obesity.

CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Dupuytren’s Contracture

Dupuytren’s (du-pwe-TRANZ) contracture is a hand deformity that usually develops over years. The condition affects a layer of tissue that lies under the skin of your palm.  This is a condition that affects the fascia—the fibrous layer of tissue that lies underneath the skin in the palm and fingers. In patients with Dupuytren’s, the fascia thickens, then tightens over time. This causes the fingers to be pulled inward, towards the palm, resulting in what is known as a “Dupuytren’s contracture.” Knots of tissue form under the skin — eventually creating a thick cord that can pull one or more fingers into a bent position.  This is why, the fascia is a layer of tissue that helps to anchor and stabilize the skin on the palm side of the hand. Without the fascia, the skin on your palm would be as loose and moveable as the skin on the back of your hand. In patients with Dupuytren’s disease, this palmar fascia slowly begins to thicken, then tighten.  As Dupuytren’s progresses, bands of fascia in the palm develop into thick cords that can tether one or more fingers and the thumb into a bent position. This is called a “Dupuytren’s contracture.” Although the cords in the palm may look like tendons, the tendons are not involved in Dupuytren’s.

 The affected fingers can’t be straightened completely, which can complicate everyday activities such as placing your hands in your pockets, putting on gloves or shaking hands.

This occurs most often in older men of Northern European descent.

The cause of Dupuytren’s disease is not completely known, but most evidence points towards genetics as having the most important role.

There are anecdotal reports of Dupuytren’s emerging or worsening after a patient experiences an injury or an open wound (including surgery) to his or her hand; however, there is no good evidence to support this. There is also no compelling evidence to suggest that it is caused by overuse of the hand.

Risk Factors:

This occurs most often in older men of Northern European descent.

The cause of Dupuytren’s disease is not completely known, but most evidence points towards genetics as having the most important role.

There are anecdotal reports of Dupuytren’s emerging or worsening after a patient experiences an injury or an open wound (including surgery) to his or her hand; however, there is no good evidence to support this. There is also no compelling evidence to suggest that it is caused by overuse of the hand.

There are a number of factors that are believed to contribute to the development or worsening of Dupuytren’s disease. These include:

  • Gender. Men are more likely to develop the condition than women.
  • Ancestry. People of northern European (English, Irish, Scottish, French, and Dutch) and Scandinavian (Swedish, Norwegian, and Finnish) ancestry are more likely to develop the condition.
  • Heredity. Dupuytren’s often runs in families.
  • Alcohol use. Drinking alcohol may be associated with Dupuytren’s.
  • Certain medical conditions. People with diabetes and seizure disorders are more likely to have Dupuytren’s.
  • Age. The incidence of the condition increases with age.

Symptoms:

Nodules. You may develop one or more small lumps, or nodules, the nodules may feel tender but, over time, this tenderness usually goes away.  There can be “pitting” or deep indentation of the skin near the nodules.

Cords. The nodules may thicken & contract=the formation of dense and tough cords of tissue under the skin. These cords can restrict or tether the fingers and thumb from straightening or from spreading apart.

Contractures. The tissue under the skin tightens, one or more of your fingers may be pulled toward your palm and may be restricted from spreading apart. The ring and little fingers are most commonly affected, but any or all of the fingers can be involved, even the thumb.

As the bend in your finger increases, it may be hard to straighten it fully. It may be difficult to grasp large objects, put your hand in your pocket, or perform other simple activities.

Diagnosing the condition:

In most cases, doctors can diagnose Dupuytren’s contracture by the look and feel of your hands. Other tests are rarely necessary.  Your doctor will compare your hands to each other and check for puckering on the skin of your palms. He or she will also press on parts of your hands and fingers to check for toughened knots or bands of tissue. Your doctor also might check to see if you can put your hand flat on a tabletop or other flat surface. Not being able to fully flatten your fingers indicates you have Dupuytren’s contracture. 

Treatment:

A number of treatments are available to slow the progression of Dupuytren’s contracture and relieve symptoms.

Know in most cases a Dupuytren’s contracture progresses very slowly, over a period of years, and may remain mild enough such that no treatment is needed. In moderate or severe cases, however, the condition makes it difficult to straighten the involved digits. When this happens, treatment may be needed to help reduce the contracture and improve motion in the affected fingers. Typically, as a contracture worsens, the involvement of the fascia becomes more severe and treatment is less likely to result in a full correction.

Currently, there is no cure for Dupuytren’s; however, the condition is not dangerous.

Although it varies from patient to patient, Dupuytren’s usually progresses very slowly and may not become troublesome for many years. In fact, for some patients, the condition may never progress beyond developing lumps in the palm.

If the condition progresses, your doctor may first recommend nonsurgical treatment to help slow the disease.

Nonsurgical Treatment

Steroid injection. Corticosteroids are powerful anti-inflammatory medications that can be injected into a painful nodule. In some cases, a corticosteroid injection may slow the progression of a contracture. The effectiveness of a steroid injection varies from patient to patient.

Splinting. Splinting is not known to prevent the progression of a finger contracture. Forceful stretching of the contracted finger may not be helpful and, in fact, could cause an injury to the finger or hand.

Splinting may be used after surgery for Dupuytren’s contracture to protect the surgical site; however, it is not known if it reduces the risk of recurrent contracture or tightening of the healing wound.

Surgical Treatment

If the contracture interferes with hand function, your doctor may recommend surgical treatment. The goal of surgery is to reduce the contracture and improve motion in the affected fingers.

There is no known cure for Dupuytren’s contracture; however, surgery is intended to “set back the clock” by reducing the restricting effect of the cords by either disrupting or removing them. Unfortunately, the healing tissues will form with the same potential to develop cords in the future—but the gains in hand function can still be substantial.

The surgical procedures most commonly performed for Dupuytren’s contracture are:

  • Fasciotomy-In this procedure, your doctor will make an incision in your palm and then divide the thickened cord(s) of tissue. Although the cord itself is not removed, dividing it helps to decrease the contracture and increase movement of the affected finger.Fasciotomy is performed using a local anesthetic that numbs just your hand without putting you to sleep. After the procedure, your wound will be left open and allowed to heal gradually. You will have to wear a splint during your recovery.
  • Subtotal palmar fasciectomy-Partial (also called limited, subtotal or selective) fasciectomy aims to remove the diseased tissue while leaving behind the normal fascia. The term ‘partial’ and related terms cover the whole range of degrees of excision between ‘segmental’ and ‘total’.

Your doctor will talk with you about which procedure is best in your case.

Fasciotomy. In this procedure, your doctor will make an incision in your palm and then divide the thickened cord(s) of tissue. Although the cord itself is not removed, dividing it helps to decrease the contracture and increase movement of the affected finger.

Fasciotomy is performed using a local anesthetic that numbs just your hand without putting you to sleep. After the procedure, your wound will be left open and allowed to heal gradually. You will have to wear a splint during your recovery.

QUOTE FOR MONDAY:

“Parents who delay or skip childhood vaccinations even when kids have no medical reasons are contributing to U.S. outbreaks of measles and whooping cough.”

Michigan Health Lab

Complications of not immunizing children!

The N.Y. State Health Department states the following:

There are many reasons parents give for delaying a vaccination, from “My baby cries when she gets the shot,” to “My child is too young to get so many vaccines.” More important than all of these excuses is one simple fact: A child’s immune system is more vulnerable without vaccinations. And if it weren’t for vaccinations, many children could become seriously ill or even die from diseases such as measles, mumps and whooping cough.

We live in an increasingly global world, with increased risks around every corner. Travelers entering into New York create an even greater risk of exposure. On a regular basis there is a new report regarding a disease outbreak somewhere in the world – including in the United States and New York State. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports outbreaks around the world and provides health information for travel to more than 200 international destinations. (cdc.gov) From mumps, to pertussis to the measles, diseases once thought to be eradicated are coming back because people are not being vaccinated as they once were. If you think tears from a needle are hard to watch, imagine the suffering your child will experience if he or she contracts a serious disease that could have been prevented.

While misinformation in the media has led many parents to delay vaccinations as a result of either Dr. Andrew Wakefield’s false claims about autism or Dr. Bob’s Alternative Schedule (aap.org), many diseases have begun to reemerge among children around the world. Don’t let your child become a statistic — make sure they get all the recommended vaccinations. And if you’re worried about autism, visit “The Truth About Autism.”

Yes there are side effects to vaccinations but the odds are slim and the reason for the vaccinations in childhood including adulthood outweighs the possible risk for side effects.  I have been a RN 31 years and have received the MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) every 10 years, flu every year, & pneumonia every 5 years and have never gotten a side effect from them.

The threat of death by disease isn’t the only medical consequence of skipping vaccinations. An unvaccinated child faces lifelong differences that could potentially put him or her at risk. Every time you call 911, ride in an ambulance, go to the doctor or visit the hospital emergency room, you must alert medical personnel of your child’s vaccination status so he or she receives distinctive treatment. Because unvaccinated children can require treatment that is out of the ordinary, medical staff may be less familiar, and less experienced, with the procedures required to appropriately treat your child.

Women who are pregnant but not vaccinated can be vulnerable to diseases that may complicate their pregnancy. A pregnant woman who contracts rubella in the first trimester may have a baby with congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), which can cause heart defects, developmental delays and deafness.

People who choose not to vaccinate their children also put others at risk if their child isn’t vaccinated and becomes ill. Special groups of people cannot be vaccinated, including those with compromised immune systems (e.g. those with leukemia or other cancers). These people rely on the general public being vaccinated so their risk of exposure is reduced.

There are also social implications of not vaccinating your child — from exclusion to quarantine. If sick or exposed to disease, your child may need to be isolated from others, including family. If there is an outbreak in your community, you may be asked to take your child out of school and other organized activities, causing your child to miss school and special events. Your child’s illness or inability to go about their daily activities also may impact your work and household income. For more information on vaccination requirements for schools in the state of New York, see New York State Immunization Requirements for School Entrance/Attendance (PDF, 71KB, 2pg.).

Everyone 6 months and older should get a seasonal flu vaccine every year. It’s important to reiterate that every year the flu remains a threat, and every year children still die as a result of having the flu. One of those children was Joseph Marotta. At 5 years old, Joseph contracted the flu. Less than 10 days after contracting the flu, Joseph died. His parents, along with other members of Families Fighting Flu (familiesfightingflu.org), are strong advocates for annual flu vaccines and encourage all families to get vaccinated. It’s important that everyone 6 months and older receives an annual flu vaccine. Every year a flu vaccine is skipped, your child is at risk.

The CDC states:

If you know your child is exposed to a vaccine-preventable disease for which he
or she has not been vaccinated:
• Learn the early signs and symptoms of the disease.
•Seek immediate medical help if your child or any family
members develop early signs or symptoms of the disease.
IMPORTANT:  Notify the doctor’s office, urgent care facility, ambulance personnel, or
emergency room staff that your child has not been fully vaccinated before medical staff have contact with your child or your family members. They need to know that your child may have a vaccine-preventable disease so that they can treat your child
correctly as quickly as possible. Medical staff also can take simple precautions to prevent diseases from spreading to others if they know ahead of time that their patient may have a contagious disease.
• Follow recommendations to isolate your child from others, including family members, and especially infants and people with weakened immune systems. Most vaccine-preventable diseases can be very dangerous to infants who are too young
to be fully vaccinated, or children who are not vaccinated due to certain medical conditions.
•Be aware that for some vaccine-preventable diseases, there are medicines to treat infected people and medicines to keep people they come in contact with from getting the disease.
•Ask your health care professional about other ways to protect your family members and anyone else who may come into contact with your child.
•Your family may be contacted by the state or local health department who track infectious disease outbreaks in the community.
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If you travel with your child:
•Review the CDC travelers’ information website (http://www.cdc.gov/travel)
before traveling to learn about possible disease risks and vaccines that will protect
your family. Diseases that vaccines prevent remain common throughout the world, including Europe.
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•Don’t spread disease to others. If an unimmunized person develops a vaccine-preventable disease while traveling, to prevent transmission to others, he or she should not travel by a plane, train, or bus until a doctor determines the person is no longer contagious.
If you or your family are not getting vaccinated please reconsider since it could prevent disease in you and your family, even prevent spreading a disease to others in your community for not getting vaccinated!

 

 

QUOTE FOR THE WEEKEND:

“As a result, many parents are inundated with horror stories of vaccine dangers, all designed to eat away at them emotionally while the medical and scientific communities have mounted their characteristic response by sharing the facts, the data, and all of the reliable peer-reviewed and well-cited research to show that vaccines are safe and effective. ”

U.S. National Library of Medicine/National Institutes of Health