QUOTE FOR THURSDAY:

“Many effective medications are available for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). These types of drugs may be prescribed for three different categories of MS treatment.”
 
MSAA Multiple Sclerosis Association of America
 
There is no cure to MS but varying treatments to MS progression so learn more on MS treatments with how the disease is treating in parts to make a whole effective plan for the patient.  Go to striveforgoodhealth.com.

Part III Multiple Sclerosis Most Updated Treatments!

 

Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis:

Today multiple sclerosis (MS) is not a curable disease. Effective strategies can help modify or slow the disease course, treat relapses (also called attacks or exacerbations), manage symptoms, improve function and safety, and address emotional health.

The model of comprehensive MS care involves the expertise of many different healthcare professionals — each contributing in a unique way to the management of the disease and the symptoms it can cause. Sometimes this team works within a single center, offering “one-stop shopping” for people with MS. More often, people are referred by their MS physician to other specialists in the community.

In either case, the goal is comprehensive=coordinated care to manage the disease and promote comfort, function, independence, health and wellness to its OPTIMAL LEVEL.

There are several types of MS:

For an acute exacerbation of multiple sclerosis that can result in neurologic symptoms and increased disability or impairments in vision, strength or coordination, the preferred initial treatment is usually a type of steroid called a glucocorticoid. Patients who do not have a good response to steroidal therapy are often treated with plasma exchange. Plasma exchange is an extreme therapy that removes antibodies to myelin from the blood.

Some patients have disease that will have an acute exacerbation followed by a prolonged quiet period, which can last years or decades. This form of disease is referred to as relapsed remitting MS, or RRMS. Patients with relapsing MS=RRMS are often treated with immune-modulating drugs such as interferon or glatiramer acetate. Glatiramer is an exciting drug. It is a series of small proteins that are similar to myelin protein. It is thought to prompt the immune system to avoid attacking myelin.

Others have a disease that gets progressively worse over time.

There are two types of progressive disease:

1 In primary progressive MS, or PPMS, symptoms steadily worsen over time from the very beginning.

Progressive MS also referred to as disease-modifying therapies (DMTs).

Presently, these include 15 drug therapies to slow MS activity and progression, each of which is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for relapsing forms of MS (and some are also approved for clinically isolated syndrome, prior to the diagnosis of MS). One of the medications, Ocrevus™ (ocrelizumab) is also approved for primary-progressive MS. In nearly all instances, these drugs are prescribed individually, so a patient only takes one DMT during any time period. Of these 15 approved drugs, eight are given at home via injection; four are given by a medical professional via intravenous (IV) infusion; and three are taken orally.

In brief, no clinical trial has shown convincing evidence of benefit in the treatment of primary progressive MS. All suggested treatments for PPMS are empiric. Several drugs that are more commonly used in the treatment of malignancy, cladribine and mitozantrone, appear to have some activity.

2 Secondary progressive MS, known as SPMS, begins as relapsed remitting disease and becomes progressive over time.

Available treatments of primary and secondary progressive MS are of limited efficacy and have significant side effects. An additional fact to consider is that most trials have not lasted longer than two or three years and give only hints about long-term results of treatment.

In brief, no clinical trial has shown convincing evidence of benefit in the treatment of primary progressive MS. All suggested treatments for PPMS are empiric. Several drugs that are more commonly used in the treatment of malignancy, cladribine and mitozantrone, appear to have some activity.

In contrast, there is definite modest benefit in some treatments for secondary progressive MS. These treatments include various regimens of steroid therapy (the anti-inflammatory effect) and the use of some drugs that modulate the immune system. Many of these drugs are more commonly used in treatment of cancer and rheumatoid arthritis such as cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and interferon.

MS should be treated by a neurologist who majors in MS with experience in managing it for years.  The doctor with knowledge is so important regarding the specific disease.  Do your research on experts treating this from NY to CA.

Remember the MS treatment is in parts to make up a whole plan:

1 Modifying the disease:

More than a dozen disease-modifying medications have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat relapsing forms of MS. These medications reduce the frequency and severity of relapses (also called attacks or exacerbations),  reduce the accumulation of lesions in the brain and spinal cord as seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and may slow the accumulation of disability for many people with MS. No medications have yet been approved to treat primary-progressive MS.

2 Treating the Exacerbations:

An exacerbation of MS is caused by inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) that causes damage to the myelin and slows or blocks the transmission of nerve impulses. To be a true exacerbation, the attack must last at least 24 hours and be separated from a previous exacerbation by at least 30 days. However, most exacerbations last from a few days to several weeks or even months. Exacerbations can be mild or severe enough to interfere with a person’s ability to function at home and at work. Severe exacerbations are most commonly treated with high-dose corticosteroids to reduce the inflammation.

 3 Managing symptoms

In MS, damage to the myelin in the CNS and to the nerve fibers themselves interferes with the transmission of nerve signals between the brain and spinal cord and other parts of the body. This disruption of nerve signals produces the symptoms of MS, which vary depending on where the damage has occurred. MS symptoms can be effectively managed with a comprehensive treatment approach that includes medication(s) and rehabilitation strategies.

4 Promoting function through rehabilitation

Rehabilitation programs focus on function — they are designed to help you improve or maintain your ability to perform effectively and safely at home and at work. Rehabilitation professionals focus on overall fitness and energy management, while addressing problems with accessibility and mobility, speech and swallowing, and memory and other cognitive functions. Rehabilitation is an important component of comprehensive, quality healthcare for people with MS at all stages of the disease. Rehabilitation programs include cognitive and vocational rehabilitation, physical and occupational therapy, therapy for speech and swallowing problems, and more. 

5 Providing emotional support

Comprehensive care includes attention to emotional health as well as physical health. Mental health professionals provide support and education, as well as diagnose and treat the depression, anxiety and other mood changes that are so common in MS. Neuropsychologists assess and treat cognitive problems.

MS is only part of overall health for a pt diagnosed with this disease!

Comprehensive MS care is only a part — but not all — of a person’s overall health management strategies.

Like the general population, people with MS are subject to medical problems that have nothing to do with their MS — which means that regular visits with a primary care physician and age-appropriate screening tests are just as important for them as they are for everyone else. And the same goes for family members — your health and well-being are important too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remember the MS treatment is in parts to make up a whole plan:

1 Modifying the disease:

More than a dozen disease-modifying medications have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat relapsing forms of MS. These medications reduce the frequency and severity of relapses (also called attacks or exacerbations),  reduce the accumulation of lesions in the brain and spinal cord as seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and may slow the accumulation of disability for many people with MS. No medications have yet been approved to treat primary-progressive MS.

2 Treating the Exacerbations: Treating exacerbations

An exacerbation of MS is caused by inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) that causes damage to the myelin and slows or blocks the transmission of nerve impulses. To be a true exacerbation, the attack must last at least 24 hours and be separated from a previous exacerbation by at least 30 days. However, most exacerbations last from a few days to several weeks or even months. Exacerbations can be mild or severe enough to interfere with a person’s ability to function at home and at work. Severe exacerbations are most commonly treated with high-dose corticosteroids to reduce the inflammation.

 3 Managing symptoms

In MS, damage to the myelin in the CNS and to the nerve fibers themselves interferes with the transmission of nerve signals between the brain and spinal cord and other parts of the body. This disruption of nerve signals produces the symptoms of MS, which vary depending on where the damage has occurred. MS symptoms can be effectively managed with a comprehensive treatment approach that includes medication(s) and rehabilitation strategies.

4 Promoting function through rehabilitation

Rehabilitation programs focus on function — they are designed to help you improve or maintain your ability to perform effectively and safely at home and at work. Rehabilitation professionals focus on overall fitness and energy management, while addressing problems with accessibility and mobility, speech and swallowing, and memory and other cognitive functions. Rehabilitation is an important component of comprehensive, quality healthcare for people with MS at all stages of the disease. Rehabilitation programs include cognitive and vocational rehabilitation, physical and occupational therapy, therapy for speech and swallowing problems, and more. 

5 Providing emotional support

Comprehensive care includes attention to emotional health as well as physical health. Mental health professionals provide support and education, as well as diagnose and treat the depression, anxiety and other mood changes that are so common in MS. Neuropsychologists assess and treat cognitive problems.

MS is only part of overall health for a pt diagnosed with this disease!

Comprehensive MS care is only a part — but not all — of a person’s overall health management strategies.

Like the general population, people with MS are subject to medical problems that have nothing to do with their MS — which means that regular visits with a primary care physician and age-appropriate screening tests are just as important for them as they are for everyone else. And the same goes for family members — your health and well-being are important too.

 

QUOTE FOR WEDNESDAY:

“MS symptoms are variable and unpredictable. No two people have exactly the same symptoms, and each person’s symptoms can change or fluctuate over time. One person might experience only one or two of the possible symptoms while another person experiences many more.”

National Multiple Sclerosis Society

Part II Multiple Sclerosis-The signs and symptoms that can occur.

Multiple Sclerosis symptoms vary from person to person but there are common symptoms with MS.  Those could be the following:

*Fatigue-Occurs in about 80% of people, can significantly interfere with ability to function at home and work, and may be the most prominent symptom in a person who otherwise has minimal activity limitations.

*Difficulties with your walking gait-Related to several factors including weakness, spasticity, loss of balance, sensory deficit and fatigue, and can be helped by physical therapy, assistive therapy and medications.

*Numbness or Tingling-Numbness of the face, body, or extremities (arms and legs) is often the first symptom experienced by those eventually diagnosed as having MS.

*Spasticity-Refers to feelings of stiffness and a wide range of involuntary muscle spasms; can occur in any limb, but it is much more common in the legs.

*Weakness-Weakness in MS, which results from deconditioning of unused muscles or damage to nerves that stimulate muscles, can be managed with rehabilitation strategies.

*Visual Problems-The first symptom of MS for many people. Onset of blurred vision, poor contrast or color vision, and pain on eye movement can be frightening — and should be evaluated promptly.

*Dizziness or Vertigo-People with MS may feel off balance or lightheaded,  and for some even much less often have the sensation that they or their surroundings are spinning (vertigo).

*Bladder Problems-Bladder dysfunction, which occurs in at least 80% of people with MS, usually can be managed quite successfully through dietary and fluid management, medications, and catheterization.

*Sexual Problems-Very common in the general population including people with MS. Sexual responses can be affected by damage in the central nervous system, as well by symptoms such as fatigue and spasticity, and by psychological factors.

*Bowel Function-Constipation is a particular concern among people with MS, as is loss of control of the bowels. Bowel issues can typically be managed through diet, adequate fluid intake, physical activity and medication.

*Pain-Pain syndromes are common in MS. In one study, 55% of people with MS had “clinically significant pain” at some time, and almost half had chronic pain.

*Cognitive changes-Refers to a range of high-level brain functions affected in 50% of people with MS, including the ability to learn and remember information, organize and problem-solve, focus attention and accurately perceive the environment.

*Emotional changes-Can be a reaction to the stresses of living with MS as well as the result of neurologic and immune changes. Bouts of depression, mood swings, irritability, and episodes of uncontrollable laughing and crying pose significant challenges for people with MS and their families.

*Depression-Studies have suggested that clinical depression — the severest form of depression — is among the most common symptoms of MS. It is more common among people with MS than it is in the general population or in persons with many other chronic, disabling conditions

Less common symptoms:

*Speech problems-this including slurring (dysarthria) and loss of volume (dysphonia) occur in approximately 25-40% of people with MS, particularly later in the disease course and during periods of extreme fatigue. Stuttering is occasionally reported as well.

*Swallowing problems — referred to as dysphagia — result from damage to the nerves controlling the many small muscles in the mouth and throat.

*Tremor, or uncontrollable shaking, can occur in various parts of the body because of damaged areas along the complex nerve pathways that are responsible for coordination of movements.

*Seizures — which are the result of abnormal electrical discharges in an injured or scarred area of the brain — have been estimated to occur in 2-5% people with MS, compared to the estimated 3% of the general population.

*Breathing Problems-Respiration problems occur in people whose chest muscles have been severely weakened by damage to the nerves that control those muscles.

*Itching-Pruritis (itching) is one of the family of abnormal sensations — such as “pins and needles” and burning, stabbing or tearing pains — which may be experienced by people with MS.

*Headaches-Although headache is not a common symptom of MS, some reports suggest that people with MS have an increased incidence of certain types of headache.

*Hearing Loss-About 6% of people who have MS complain of impaired hearing. In very rare cases, hearing loss has been reported as the first symptom of the disease.

Secondary and tertiary symptoms

While the primary symptoms described on this page (more and less common) are the direct result of damage to the myelin and nerve fibers in the central nervous system (CNS), the secondary symptoms are the complications that can arise as a result of these primary symptoms. For example:

  • Bladder dysfunction can cause repeated urinary tract infections.
  • Inactivity can result in loss of muscle tone and disuse weakness (not related to demyelination), poor postural alignment and trunk control, decreased bone density (and resulting increased risk of fracture), and shallow, inefficient breathing
  • Immobility can lead to pressure sores.

While secondary symptoms can be treated, the optimal goal is to avoid them by treating the primary symptoms.

Tertiary symptoms are the “trickle down” effects of the disease on your life. These symptoms include social, vocational and psychological complications. For example, if you are no longer able to drive or walk, you may not be able to hold down your usual job. The stress and strain of dealing with MS often alters social networks and sometimes fractures relationships. Problems with bladder control, tremor or swallowing may cause people to withdraw from social interactions and become isolated.

Depression is very common in people with MS. Depression may be both a primary and a tertiary symptom as it can be caused by the disease process itself and/or triggered by the challenges discussed above.

Tune in tomorrow for Part III about the treatments of MS!

QUOTE FOR TUESDAY:

“In MS-Multiple Sclerosis, the immune system attacks the protective sheath (myelin sheath) that covers nerve fibers for protection but since the myelin gets attacked it causes communication problems between your brain, the spinal cord & the rest of your body due to the obstruction of the transmission of messages.”

MAYO CLINIC

Part I What is MS-Multiple Sclerosis, the causes & how it is diagnosed?

MS=Multiple Sclerosis is a long-lasting disease that can affect your brain, spinal cord, and the optic nerves in your eyes. It can cause problems with vision, balance, muscle control, and other basic body functions.

The effects are often different for everyone who has the disease. Some people have mild symptoms and don’t need treatment. Others will have trouble getting around and doing daily tasks.

MS happens when your immune system attacks a fatty material called myelin, which wraps around your nerve fibers to protect them-an outer shell. Without this outer shell, your nerves become damaged. Scar tissue may form and transmission of signals from brain to the nerve endings with messages to do functions are obstructed in allowing the body to do functions.

This damage means your brain can’t send signals through your body correctly. Your nerves also don’t work as they should to help you move and feel.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body.

It can be a challenge for doctors to diagnose multiple sclerosis (MS). There’s no one test that can definitely show if someone has it. And there are many conditions with symptoms that can seem like MS.

But a neurologist who specializes in treating the disease should be able to look into how you’re feeling and help you figure out if your symptoms mean you have MS or another problem.

The causes of MS – Multiple Sclerosis:

Doctors don’t know for sure what causes MS, but there are many things that seem to make the disease more likely.

People with certain genes may have higher chances of getting it.

Smoking also may raise the risk.

Some people may get MS after they’ve had a viral infection — like the Epstein-Barr virus or the human herpesvirus 6 — that makes their immune system stop working normally. The infection may trigger the disease or cause relapses. Scientists are studying the link between viruses and MS, but they don’t have a clear answer yet.

Some studies even suggest that vitamin D, which you can get from sunlight, may strengthen your immune system and protect you from MS.

Some people with higher chances of getting the disease move to sunnier regions seem to lower their risk; like my cousin from the NJ to South Carolina.

Diagnostic Tooling done for ruling out multiple sclerosis is:

*Imaging tests, like an MRI– to take a closer look at your brain. Magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, or magnetic resonance tomography is a medical imaging technique used in radiology to image the anatomy and the physiological processes of the body in both health and disease. MRI scanners use strong magnetic fields, radio waves, and field gradients to form images of the body.

MRIs can reveal areas of MS (lesions) on your brain and spinal cord. You may receive an intravenous injection of a contrast material to highlight lesions that indicate your disease is in an active phase.

*Spinal taps, also called lumbar punctures, to check the fluid that runs through your spinal column  When doctors do this test, they’re looking closely at the fluid in your spine, called cerebrospinal fluid, for higher levels of proteins and other substances that are signs of the disease. These can be helpful in diagnosing MS, but they’re not absolute proof of the condition. Your doctor can tell you if you need to have a spinal tap

*Electrical tests, called evoked potentials, to see if MS has affected your nerve pathways.   Electrical tests of your nerves, called evoked potentials, can help doctors confirm if the condition has affected the parts of your brain that help you see, hear, and feel. Your doctor will place wires on your scalp to test your brain’s response as you watch a pattern on a video screen, hear a series of clicks, or get electrical pulses on your arm or leg.

The MD record the electrical signals produced by your nervous system in response to stimuli. An evoked potential test may use visual stimuli or electrical stimuli, in which you watch a moving visual pattern, or short electrical impulses are applied to nerves in your legs or arms. Electrodes measure how quickly the information travels down your nerve pathways.

*Blood tests. Tests to check for specific biomarkers associated with MS are currently under development and may also aid in diagnosing the disease.

Stayed tune to Part II tomorrow regarding signs/symptoms and modern treatments!

 

QUOTE FOR MONDAY:

“Of all the causes of death in the US, the leading top 10 causes account for nearly 75% of all deaths and the top 3 causes account for over 50% of all deaths in the country, with the main culprits remaining relatively consistent for at least the last five years.”

CDC Center for Disease and Prevention

TOP 3 Diseases effecting over 50% of the causes of death in the country America!

The news has been filled with stories about Ebola, breast cancer and Methicillin Resistant Staph Aureus (MRSA) which all gets a lot of press today. Would it surprise you to know that neither makes the list of the 10 deadliest diseases in the USA? Even more surprising, perhaps, is that several of the deadliest diseases, including the number one killer in the world, are at least partially preventable.  It is right under are nose people but it doesn’t seem to be a topic of discussion in SCHOOL, you when young, taught at that grade level for the child to comprehend.  It is not even a standard topic in college to pass on health education which obviously our country needs based on the statistics of disease and Obesity alone which causes a lot of the diseases after being obese for a long period of time which could have been prevented but for millions of people it is not the priority over food.  Why?  It takes an individual to want to make change in their life either drastically or gradually depending on how much to you need to or desire to lose weight.  The people that surround you frequently and that are important to you helps if they are supporting that cause since it helps first you and all the people around you; like your children and even significant other to other family members (mom, close cousin, etc…) and even friends.  If we all made this a cause our health care system would end up being a lot more affordable for all but we the society make it difficult with too many staying unhealthy.  Wake up Americans take care of yourself to help yourself and all around you.   Where a person lives, having the access to preventive care, and the quality of healthcare provided in a community are all factors that can either benefit or put people in that community into the risk of obesity.

Surprising news is that we, due to not regarding our health as a priority in many areas of the USA show the following statistics:

Of all the causes of death in the US, the leading top 10 causes account for nearly 75% of all deaths and the top 3 causes account for over 50% of all deaths in the country, with the main culprits remaining relatively consistent for at least the last five years.

The top leading 10 causes  of death are:

  1. Heart disease (which can be prevented)
  2. Cancer (malignant neoplasms). Some cancers without question can be prevented (lung CA due to smoking)
  3. Chronic lower respiratory disease (same as above if we are referring to emphysema and its due to smoking)
  4. Stroke (cerebrovascular diseases) (this also in many cases can be prevented)  Check out Monday’s article.
  5. Accidents (unintentional injuries)
  6. Alzheimer’s disease
  7. Diabetes (diabetes mellitus) If its diabetes II; usually due to obesity and diet.
  8. Influenza and pneumonia
  9. Kidney disease (nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and nephrosis)
  10. Suicide (intentional self-harm).

1.)Heart Disease shows:

  • Deaths: 596,577
  • Males: 308,398
  • Females: 288,179
  • Rate: 191.5
  • Age-adjusted rate: 173.7
  • Percentage of total deaths: 23.71%.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the US and also the leading cause of death worldwide. More than half of the deaths that occur as a result of heart disease are in men.

Coronary heart disease costs the US $108.9 billion each year and is the most common type of heart disease.3

Heart disease is a term used to describe several problems related to plaque buildup in the walls of the arteries.  Ending line clogging up the vessels closing up the pipelines our blood is carried through (vessels) to give oxygen to our blood tissues with taking carbon dioxide to the lungs for more 02 when its used up by our cells who carry oxygen to our tissues (02 is the fuel for our body to stay alive).

As the plaque builds up, the arteries narrow, making it more difficult for blood to flow and creating a risk for heart attack or stroke due to ischemia (Lack of oxygen to the tissues.  If its lack of 02 to the heart angina to an MI if its the brain a TIA-transient ischemic attack or worse a CVA-stroke).  Remember, prevention=protection is the first step so you don’t get this problem at all.  Ending line the better you take care of yourself the higher the odds you will not get this problem.

How can you take this step in PREVENTION;

 Protecting the heart

Lowering blood pressure and cholesterol can significantly lower heart disease risk.

  • Follow instructions on medication usage if your already on it
  • Make sure diet is low in salt, fat, saturated fat and cholesterol and high in fresh fruits and vegetables
  • It is recommended that exercise in the form of a brisk 10 minute walk takes place 3 times a day, 5 days a week
  • Avoid excessive alcohol use
  • Quit smoking
  • All steps listed above if you follow has even caused patients to stop medications completely because the changes listed above caused the problem in high statistics with the individual having no heredity.

2: Cancer (malignant neoplasms)

  • Deaths: 576,691
  • Males: 302,231
  • Females: 274,460
  • Rate: 185.1
  • Age-adjusted rate: 169.0
  • Percentage of total deaths: 22.92%.

Cancer affects men and woman of all ages, races and ethnicities.5 The National Institutes of Health (NIH) estimate the total costs of cancer in 2009 were $216.6 billion: $86.6 billion for direct medical costs and $130.0 billion for indirect mortality costs.

Cancer is a group of diseases characterized by the uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells. If the spread is not controlled, it can result in death.

In 2014, about 585,720 American are expected to die of cancer – almost 1,600 people per day.

Lung cancer accounts for more deaths than any other cancer in both men and women. Deaths from cancer of the trachea, bronchus and lung stand at 157,017 annually with this figure expected to rise to 159,260 in 2014.

Estimated cancer-related deaths for 2014

Leading causes of death from cancer for males:

  1. Lung and bronchus – 86,930 (28%)
  2. Prostate – 29,480 (10%)
  3. Colon and rectum – 26,270 (8%)
  4. Pancreas – 20,170 (7%)
  5. Liver and intrahepatic bile duct – 15,870 (5%)
  6. Leukemia – 14,040 (5%)
  7. Esophagus – 12,450 (4%)
  8. Urinary bladder – 11,170 (4%)
  9. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma – 10,470 (3%)
  10. Kidney and renal pelvis – 8,900 (3%).

Leading causes of death from cancer for females:

  1. Lung and bronchus – 72,330 (26%)
  2. Breast – 40,000 (15%)
  3. Colon and rectum – 24,040 (9%)
  4. Pancreas – 19,420 (7%)
  5. Ovary – 14,270 (5%)
  6. Leukemia – 10,050 (4%)
  7. Uterine corpus – 8,590 (3%)
  8. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma – 8,520 (3%)
  9. Liver and intrahepatic bile duct – 7,130 (3%)
  10. Brain and other nervous system – 6,230 (2%).

Can cancer be prevented?

A substantial proportion of cancers could be prevented. All cancers caused by cigarette smoking and heavy use of alcohol could be prevented completely. In 2014, almost 176,000 of the estimated 585,720 deaths will be caused by tobacco use.

The World Cancer Research Fund has estimated that up to one-third of cancer cases that occur in economically developed countries like the US are related to being overweight, obese, inactive or having poor nutrition. These are all potentially preventable.

Particular cancers are related to infectious agents such as human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) – these may be prevented through behavioral changes and use of protective vaccinations or antibiotic treatments.

Many of the more than 3 million skin cancer cases that are diagnosed annually could be prevented by protecting skin from excessive sun exposure and avoiding indoor tanning.

Screening offers the ability for secondary prevention by detecting cancer early, before symptoms appear. Early detection usually results in less extensive treatment and better outcomes.

Screening for colorectal and cervical cancers can prevent cancer by allowing for detection and removal of pre-cancerous lesions.

Awareness about changes in the body to breasts, skin or testicles may result in detection of tumors at an earlier stage.

Learn more about cancer at the American Cancer Society or Caner treatment.com with so many other places on the internet, to our library, to our MD and much more.   All you have to do is research, take the time

3: Chronic lower respiratory disease

  • Deaths: 142,943
  • Males: 67,521
  • Females: 75,422
  • Rate: 45.9
  • Age-adjusted rate: 42.5
  • Percentage of total deaths: 5.68%.

Chronic lower respiratory disease (CLRD) is a collection of lung diseases that cause airflow blockage and breathing-related issues, including primarily chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but also bronchitis, emphysema (is due to alot of smokers) and asthma.

Bronchitis (chronic) has active and inactive stages where most get it through their lifetime.  How often has depending factors.  Bronchitis may be either acute or chronic.   Often developing from a cold or other respiratory infection, acute bronchitis is very common.

*Chronic bronchitis, a more serious condition, is a constant irritation or inflammation of the lining of the bronchial tubes, often due to smoking.

*Acute bronchitis usually improves within a few days without lasting effects, although you may continue to cough for weeks. However, if you have repeated bouts of bronchitis, you may have chronic bronchitis, which requires medical attention. in 2020.

A study released by The American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) estimated that 16.4 million days of work were lost annually because of COPD, and total absenteeism costs were $3.9 billion. Of the medical costs, 18% was paid for by private insurance, 51% by Medicare, and 25% by Medicaid. National medical costs are projected to increase from $32.1 billion in 2010 to $49.0 billion

Major warning signs and symptoms of COPD

Signs and symptoms of COPD may include:

  • Increased breathlessness when active
  • A persistent cough with phlegm
  • Frequent chest infections.

How can COPD be prevented?

In the US, tobacco smoke is a KEY FACTOR in the development and progression of COPD, although exposure to air pollutants in the home and workplace, genetic factors, and respiratory infections also play a role.7

Smoking is a primary risk factor of COPD, and approximately 80% of COPD deaths can be attributed to smoking.  So regular daily smokers why don’t you just drink poison?  Best is to not smoke at all but at least do it once in a awhile.  Abusing anything usually turns into injury (For example take alcohol to simply verbally or physically abusing and doing it over and over again which makes it easier to do which isn’t right to do at all.  Abuse is just used as an exampte not that it is right at all, I reenforce)

To prevent COPD

  • Quit smoking
  • Avoid secondhand smoke
  • Avoid air pollution
  • Avoid chemical fumes
  • Avoid dust

The FDA have approved the once-daily inhaled drug olodaterol (brand name Striverdi Respimat), a long-acting beta-agonist, for the treatment of airflow obstruction in COPD patients.

Doctors are missing chances to diagnose COPD early in up to 85% of cases

COPD is a progressive disease that causes irreversible damage to the lungs. Now, a new study reveals that doctors are missing chances to diagnose the condition early.

If this correct than that gives us as people not to depend just on the MD but to take care of ourselves in particular on preventative measures to give you higher odds that you will not even have to deal with the diagnosis at all.

QUOTE FOR THE WEEKEND:

“According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC )the 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest in history, affecting in West Africa.”

CDC Centers for Disease Prevention and Control

EBOLA is back! It was found with incidences in Africa this past week which could spread to other countries.

What is Ebola and how does it spread?

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC )the 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest in history, affecting in West Africa. One imported case from Liberia and associated locally acquired cases in healthcare workers have been documented. CDC and partners are taking precautions to prevent the further spread of Ebola within the United States.  We should have taken action with making limitations a long time ago but again our government seems to worry about other countries more than our own or else we would not have this potential epidemic.  Look at what is finally being doing in airports at least in New York regarding visitors coming from Africa, they are being checked for disease in someway, that should have started years ago with the increase or population into our country from people unfortunately in other countries with more disease due to less protection or action due to their economy and what they can afford.  Yet, in the end our government needs to protect us the US citizens and have a regulation much more tighter than it was if US citizens for whatever the reason is leaving this country to other countries for business (EX. News Report Employees.) or vacation is allowed; which it has been going on for ages.  The key factor like to almost any disease or infection in or out of hospitals is:  Prevention!

MSF (Médecins Sans Frontières) health staff in protective clothing constructing perimeter for isolation ward.

***Background of the disease Ebola

***The Ebola virus causes an acute, serious illness which is often fatal if untreated. Ebola virus disease (EVD) first appeared in 1976 in 2 simultaneous outbreaks, one in Nzara, Sudan, and the other in Yambuku, Democratic Republic of Congo. The latter occurred in a village near the Ebola River, from which the disease takes its name.

The outbreak in West Africa, (first cases notified in March 2014), is the largest and most complex Ebola outbreak since the Ebola virus was first discovered in 1976.  Well its back again There have been more cases and deaths in this outbreak than all others combined. It has also spread between countries starting in Guinea then spreading across land borders to Sierra Leone and Liberia, by air (1 traveller only) to Nigeria, and by land (1 traveller) to Senegal.  God willing we do something fast enough with all the medical technology we have in America and fine a way to control it in our own country; we came through in controlling the flu and so many other epidemics.

The most severely affected countries, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia have very weak health systems, lacking human and infrastructural resources, having only recently emerged from long periods of conflict and instability.   On August 8, the WHO Director-General declared this outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.  Well the US better do something fast to prevent both me and many others in this home land to keep us safe.  By the way I am RN 26 years and this topic Ebola concerns me terribly.

 A few years back when Ebola hit America according to the CDC this is this episode, “there were about 8,900 cases of Ebola infection worldwide with almost 4,500 deaths as of this week. And, the World Health Organization that we may see 10,000 new cases per week by the end of that year.

Transmissiono of Ebola

It is thought that fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family are natural Ebola virus hosts. Ebola is introduced into the human population through close contact with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected animals such as chimpanzees, gorillas, fruit bats, monkeys, forest antelope and porcupines found ill or dead or in the rainforest that picked up this virus.

Ebola then spreads through human-to-human transmission via direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes) with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected people, and with surfaces and materials (e.g. bedding, clothing) contaminated with these fluids.

Health-care workers have frequently been infected while treating patients with suspected or confirmed EVD. This has occurred through close contact with patients when infection control precautions are not strictly practiced or taught to the medical workers through detailed and concise information with written instructions,  proper demonstration, with most important follow up by health care worker superiors like managers to nursing education depts.

For further information on this go to my reference http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs103/en/The World Health Organization. ***

There is no FDA-approved vaccine available for Ebola, unfortunately but like most after damage occurs in enough quantities (which is the case) in time most diseases come up with one regarding the many over the few diseases we haven’t seem to have invented yet.  So the key for this disease right now is PREVENTION of it.

 

Keep in mind through the CDC we are in the U.S. working on a treatment. Let us take a look.

“Experimental vaccines and treatments for Ebola are under development, but they have not yet been fully tested for safety or effectiveness.

Recovery from Ebola depends on good supportive care and the patient’s immune response. People who recover from Ebola infection develop antibodies that last for at least 10 years, possibly longer. It isn’t known if people who recover are immune for life or if they can become infected with a different species of Ebola. Some people who have recovered from Ebola have developed long-term complications, such as joint and vision problems.”

Here are some tips given by the CDC (Center for Disease Control):

If you travel to or are in an area affected by an Ebola outbreak, make sure to do the following:

  • Practice careful hygiene. For example, wash your hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer and avoid contact with blood and body fluids.
  • Do not handle items that may have come in contact with an infected person’s blood or body fluids (such as clothes, bedding, needles, and medical equipment). In a hospital patients with contaminating diseases through blood, secretions or fluids of the body is when contact isolation is used to prevent the spread of diseases (EX. MRSA, VRE)that can be spread through contact with open wounds, urine, blood, simple secretions of the body (even tears or fluids coming from the eye).  Health care workers making contact with a patient on contact isolation are required to wear gloves, a gown, even a mask if one wants (which I without question do for any contact isolation a pt is on for their contaminating disease to prevent spread on me or others).  With Ebola it may even go into further restrictions with disease to PREVENT further contamination which is only watching the safety of all citizens and visitors in this country or hopefully this will be carried out in Africa and anywhere else at this point.
  • Avoid funeral or burial rituals that require handling the body of someone who has died from Ebola.
  • Avoid contact with bats and nonhuman primates or blood, fluids, and raw meat prepared from these animals.
  • Avoid hospitals in West Africa where Ebola patients are being treated, if .not needed. The U.S. embassy or consulate is often able to provide advice on facilities.

How bad is it elsewhere? In West Africa, pretty bad. Lack of resources and a slow global response has let the virus run wild. Over at Nature, they used WHO data to illustrate just how terrifying it’s getting. For an on-the-ground perspective, see what Karin Huster, a healthcare worker who just got back from treating Ebola in Liberia’s clinics, told R29. We’re also beginning to feel the first economic effects of the crisis.

What is the CDC doing to stop the spread of Ebola? Well, the first thing to remember is that the U.S. is not in the middle of the same kind of outbreak those in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia have been dealing with for months now. Ebola has not spread to the general American population, and those who have contracted the virus here have been in close contact with someone who was already severely infected. Complicating matters, the nurses who cared for Duncan report that they were forced to do so without proper training or equipment. And, Vinson says that she called the CDC before getting on her flight with a low-grade fever, but was told her temperature did not surpass the dangerous threshold (100.4 degrees Fahrenheit). However, the CDC has learned from its slow response to Dallas and has vowed to dispatch an Ebola response team to any hospital in the country with a confirmed case of the

How contagious is Ebola? Compared to other diseases you are more likely to get (such as enterovirus D68, the measles, and the flu), Ebola is not very contagious. It has a long incubation period (21 days) during which an infected person may begin to show symptoms. But, as far as we know, that person is not contagious until he or she is symptomatic. Ebola can only be spread by: direct contact with the bodily fluids of someone who is contagious (e.g., blood, urine, vomit); objects that have been contaminated with those fluids; or infected mammals, such as bats.

What are the symptoms of Ebola? Fever, headache, muscle pain, severe vomiting, and bloody diarrhea, among other unpleasant things. These symptoms hit hard and and they hit fast. They also get worse the longer you’re infected. So, if you feel kind of icky but are still dragging yourself to work, you’re probably Ebola-free.

Can we treat it? Not in every case. We have several experimental options, such as ZMapp, that have worked for some human cases or in animals. But, American scientists are still working on a cure that can save as many people as possible — and get approved by the FDA, too. Chinese and Russian scientists are on the case too, reportedly working on a cure and vaccine, respectively. But, Ebola is not necessarily a death sentence. About half of the people who have contracted it worldwide have lived to tell the tale. The CDC says whether or not you survive depends on your immune system and the quality of care you’re getting. And, when a person recovers from the virus, he or she will have antibodies that will protect against Ebola infection for at least 10 years.

Can we protect against it? Yes — with proper hand hygiene, basic public health tactics, a vaccine on the way, and a ramped-up CDC response.

Finally,  I reinforce that unless you have had direct contact with the bodily fluids of someone with Ebola when that person was contagious (or if you’ve eaten some bushmeat recently), then your risk for Ebola are low and you don’t need to worry about getting it.  Really, even Fox News says so. Instead, you should probably just get yourself a flu shot with how much higher you are at risk of getting the flu as opposed to the disease Ebola but our country should take strict action in preventing a disease epidemic in travelers coming back or from Africa to the US or any other country that has this disease in their country, safety for the people in America.

 

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