QUOTE FOR MONDAY:

“It’s amazing how many subtle ways we are connected to plants, and science proves it. Without plants, life on Earth simply would not exist. Through the process of photosynthesis, plants produce oxygen, as well as purifying the air of pollutants. Plants convert the carbon dioxide people and animals exhale into fresh oxygen. Plants can also filter out dangerous toxins such as formaldehyde, benzene, and mold particles from our homes and offices.

Likewise, plants can raise the ambient humidity of a room as they transpire moisture into the air, creating a more comfortable environment to breathe in. The more plants you have in your office or apartment garden, the more they can improve the air quality around you.

If you already have your ēdn SmallGarden growing, a few complimentary low-maintenance houseplants known to actively purify air are the Snake Plant, Peace Lily, Spider Plant, Pothos Ivy, and Dracaena.”

edn (https://www.edntech.com)

Part I Believe or not, PLANTS do enhance our lives both mentally and physically!

 

 

Plants by 20% can improve memory, attention span and concentration outside in wildlife.  Studies have even shown that tasks performed while under the calming influence of nature are bettered performed (from sitting with our pets to being outdoors with mother nature in pleasant weather to that individual’s mind—from rain to a pleasant sunny day with birds chirping or even by a rain fall dropping near the person).

Keeping ornamental plants in the home and in the workplace increases memory retention and concentration. The calming influence of natural environments is conducive to positive work environments by increasing a person’s ability to concentrate on the task at hand. Work performed under the natural influence of ornamental plants is normally of higher quality and completed with a much higher accuracy rate than work done in environments devoid of nature. Going outside or being under the influence of plants can increase memory retention up to twenty percent, a recent University of Michigan study showed (Sewach). The effect of nature in the home and in the workplace serves to stimulate both the senses and the mind, improving mental cognition and performance. (Bisco Werner 1996; Brethour 2007; Frank 2003; Pohmer 2008; Serwach 2008; Shibata, 2001, 2004; Yannick 2009).

Even take parks or places like botanical gardens that both often play as a host to educational programs and special events, which do contribute to the awareness of culture and education of the community, especially children.  The better the environment the better the effect.  Example take a highly criminal area as opposed to a lesser one. Installing a park or botanical garden in a community has many direct benefits to residents, but an auxiliary benefit of having such a naturalized landmark in the community is the special events and cultural opportunities it brings to people who might not otherwise be exposed. Botanical gardens and zoos often create educational programs for children in order to teach them how the value of being environmentally-conscious and conserving the environment. They can also impact adults in the community as well, creating a cultural awareness of the importance of natural environments. Parks and gardens foster an appreciation for nature that often instills in residents a sense of responsibility for the caring of and protection of the environment. (Appleseed, Inc. 2009, Dubey 2007, Nadel 2005, Phipps Botanical Gardens and Conservatory 2010)

Parks and urban green spaces impact people’s health by providing them with an inexpensive (often free) and convenient recreational service. There is a positive correlation between the presence of a park in a neighborhood and the level of physical activity of the residents; people are much more likely to exercise when there is a no-cost, aesthetically pleasing area or facility for them to use.  Many are more out to do simple (walking) or more intense (running) outside to even handball or basketball do just mental exercise (reading) all outdoors in nice parks as opposed to a high urban area of just warehouses and buildings with no park or in a work out place with all just nautilus and weights all over the public place that has high probability of picking up cold, flu, infections.  Why?  In high probability your exposed to much more germs and bacteria as opposed to a park or your own home in or outside.   Less host build up of germs and bacteria.  Public places are high percentage in where you pick up germs and bacteria.

Believe it or not is helps in the healing process.  Shrubs, trees, and flowers have a practical application in hospitals.  Whether the the presence of plants are in the patients hospital rooms or viewed outside the room seeing beautiful parks via their window greatly reduces the time necessary to heal. The soothing effects of ornamental flowers and plants are so great that simply having daily views of flowers and other ornamental plants in landscaped areas outside patient recovery room significantly speed up recovery time; now if unfortunately the patient is terminal it’s a much greater atmosphere to be around than just four walls.

Ornamental plants affect the levels of compassion that people feel for others. Studies have shown that people who spend more time around plants are much more likely to try and help others, and often have more advanced social relationships. People who care for nature are more likely to care for others, reaching out to their peers and forming shared bonds resulting from their common interests.

Spending time in nature gives people an increased feeling of vitality, increasing their energy levels and making them feel more animated. Their performance levels are, in turn, increased by this improved state of mind. Natural environments induce a positive outlook on life, making people feel more alive and active. When people experience increased vigor, they put more of themselves and their energy into their work.  People who spend more time outside in nature have a significantly more positive outlook on life than people who spend a great deal of time indoors, based on the majority.

One of the more obvious benefits of plants and trees is that many of them have valuable medicinal properties. Cultivating plants helps humanity because it provides opportunities for additional scientific studies of the possible positive medicinal values of plants. Natural herbal remedies are simple and holistic methods for treating common illnesses and maladies.

Simply regarding STRESS, plants help people with dealing with it in a positive way.  How you ask; by helping many people transform their stress into a more positive emotion, this can be done commonly done in America in a pent house, back yard to farming, gardening-it gives people an excellent coping mechanism for their daily frustrations. Plants to even nurturing them helps reduce stress levels and gives people a way to cope with their negative feelings, in letting them release rather than build up.   Gardening can have therapeutic effects on people who have undergone trauma, either mental or physical. The act of nurturing a plant can provide victims with a way to work through their issues and heal their wounds, whether they are on the surface of the skin or deeper. Cultivating plants also improves their mental states and helps to put them in a better place for recovering. Gardening is a therapeutic tool.

Beautifying traffic medians not only improves the aesthetics of the roadways, it also affects driver attitudes. Studies show that drivers are more at ease on roadways with natural landscaping, and are much more inclined to think positively about the community that they are driving through if the roadways are beautiful. Furthermore, adding trees to roadways creates a sort of natural obstruction which could reduce the likelihood of cars crossing medians into oncoming traffic lanes. This improves driver safety and makes the community a safer place for everyone to live in.

Believe it or not plants enhance our lives! 

 

 

 

QUOTE FOR THE WEEKEND:

Ticks are most active in the spring in most climates, but they do not disappear in the fall. Fall is often the time of year pet parents find the most ticks. This is due to ticks settling into fall foliage for a nice, cozy winter.  Remember the fall is right around the corner!  Ticks are not just a summer problem. While some types of ticks may slow down when it gets colder, others are just getting started. A lot of the risk depends on the species of ticks you are dealing with, and your region of the country. Simply put, ticks should be considered as a year-round health threat, with autumn being a major tick season.”

PetHealthNetwork

LYME DISEASE

Tick bites into skin and digs into the skin       Tic fills up the blood sac for foodlyme disease lyme disease

 

lyme disease bThe mark the tick leaves behind on the arm it bit.

 

                         lyme disease d

In 2013, there were more than 25,000 confirmed cases of Lyme disease reported across the country, according to the Center For Disease Control And Prevention.

Lyme disease is of course a potentially debilitating infection spread by ticks. A special conference this weekend, now in it’s fourth year — is hoping to help raise awareness.

On Saturday, September 12, the Mt. Valley Lyme Disease Awareness Coalition will hold it’s 4th Annual Lyme Conference. This year’s day long event will be held at Telstar Regional High School in Bethel and is open to the public. Donations at that door to help in their researching.

We’re constantly hearing about the threat of Lyme disease when it comes to our pets. However, sometimes it takes star power in order to bring a dangerous condition into the “Lyme-light” for humans. This is exactly what Yolanda Foster, from the reality television show, Real Housewives of Beverly Hills, and wife of composer David Foster, did after suffering unexplainable symptoms—such as emotional outbursts, nervous system abnormalities, skin issues, and loss brain function. Her diagnoses: chronic Lyme disease.

Lyme disease is a bacterial illness that is spread by the borrelia burgdorferi bacteria in tick insect bites. Once infected, the victim (human or animal) will suffer the consequences in multiple stages that stretch from the first bite to the spread of Lyme antibodies within the blood, and the symptoms.

The most common tick-borne illness in North America and Europe, Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of an infected blacklegged tick.

The most common signs or symptoms indicating Lyme Disease:

You have flu-like symptoms

One of the common symptoms of Lyme disease is feeling like you have a flu. This means that you’ll begin suffering from a runny nose, fevers, chills, and shaking. All the symptoms you associate with the flu can also indicate that you are in the early stages of Lyme disease and it’s at this point that you should go and see a doctor.

Many people will simply brush off the conditions and take medication bought over the counter, but if you can catch the disease at this stage, it’s far simpler to treat.

You have a stiff neck

If your neck is sore and you have the above-mentioned flu-like symptoms, it’s possible that you have developed Lyme disease. A stiff neck is a really common indicator of having recently contracted the disease. The reason it begins is because of the infection traveling around the body and if you find yourself with this pain, it’s important to get checked right away. Not only that but the pain involved with it can also get worse, making it almost unbearable. At this stage you should definitely see a doctor.

Headaches

On top of the above two symptoms, headaches will usually begin when you are in the early stages of developing the condition. A checkup is essential at this stage, your doctor will be able to provide you with treatment that is more effective the sooner after you contract the disease.

Muscle numbness

Muscle numbness occurs even during the early stages of Lyme disease making it difficult to move and creating either a numbness or a tingling feeling in muscles all over the body. Another common complaint is that the individual has shooting pains that go from the top of the leg to the bottom.

These symptoms are worrisome whether you have Lyme disease or not, so be sure to speak to your doctor as soon as you start experiencing these kinds of serious symptoms.

Fatigue

One of the signature symptoms of Lyme disease that most people have heard about is fatigue. This symptom occurs later on in the disease and is actually known as ‘post-Lyme syndrome’. It is far more than just feeling tired – it makes the muscles completely incapable of moving.

Along with the fatigue, the individual will suffer great pain in their muscles, bones, and joints.

Swelling

This symptom is more common during the early stages of the disease and it includes the swelling of the muscles, joints, and anywhere else in the body. The effect occurs as the body tries to protect itself from the bacteria that has invaded. Swelling is a natural response to many conditions and, as time goes by, the individual will find that the swelling can get worse and worse.

Heart problems

If you have heart problems and your family doesn’t have a history of it, this could be an indicator that you have Lyme disease and simply haven’t realized it yet. This is far less common than other symptoms, but in some cases an irregular heartbeat can actually suggest that you have Lyme disease and left it untreated for a long period of time.

If you have an irregular heartbeat, there’s no need to assume that you have Lyme disease – but you should of course go ahead with all the tests that your doctors want you to go ahead with.

Muscle numbness

Muscle numbness occurs even during the early stages of Lyme disease making it difficult to move and creating either a numbness or a tingling feeling in muscles all over the body. Another common complaint is that the individual has shooting pains that go from the top of the leg to the bottom.

These symptoms are worrisome whether you have Lyme disease or not, so be sure to speak to your doctor as soon as you start experiencing these kinds of serious symptoms.

Bull’s eye rash

The bull’s eye rash is the first sign of Lyme disease, and it occurs around the region that the tick originally embedded itself into the skin. There are lots of ways that this rash might appear, with the first being the obvious bull’s eye shape, with a blistering lesion in the middle and surrounding circles of redness. Some lesions may have a uniform red color, others may be disseminated and others may appear blue-red. The thing to look out for is a large circular rash that appears dark red.

Facial drooping

This is one of the most serious symptoms of Lyme disease and is pretty uncommon, but it’s important to know about nonetheless. This symptom includes the dropping of the face, where muscles stop working and you find it difficult to speak. Some individuals have experienced this symptom, known as facial palsy, to the extent that it resembles a stroke. This is of course something very serious and something you should go straight to hospital about should you begin experiencing it.

Facts to know about lyme disease:

-Lyme disease is caused by bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi that is only transmitted to humans when they are bitten by an infected tick.

-To infect its host, a tick typically must be attached to the skin for at least 36 hours.

-Most cases of Lyme disease occur in late spring and early summer.

– The most common symptoms of Lyme disease include a red, circular “bulls-eye” rash often accompanied by muscle and joint aches. About 70 to 80 percent of people infected develop the rash, which shows up several days to weeks after the tick bite.

-Lyme disease is diagnosed by medical history, physical exam, and sometimes a blood test. It may take four to six weeks for the human immune system to make antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi and therefore show up in a positive blood test. That is why patients with the Lyme rash usually have a negative blood test and diagnosis is based on the characteristic appearance of the rash. Patients with other clinical manifestations such as Lyme arthritis will usually have a blood test.  Anyone who has symptoms for longer than six weeks and who has never been treated with antibiotics is unlikely to have Lyme disease if the blood test is negative.

-Most cases of Lyme disease are successfully treated with a few weeks of antibiotics. Using antibiotics for a very long time (months or years) does not offer superior results and in fact can be dangerous, because it can cause potentially fatal complications.

-Approximately 95 percent of all cases of Lyme disease occur in the Northeast and the Upper Midwest.

-Researchers didn’t identify the cause of Lyme disease and connect it with ticks until 1981. The bacterium that causes the disease is named in honor of Willy Burgdorfer, the scientist who made the connection.

-There were nearly 30,000 confirmed cases of Lyme disease in 2009 and more than 8,500 probable cases. The number has risen steadily since 1995, when there were only 11,700 confirmed cases.

– The best treatment for Lyme disease is prevention: Be cautious when walking in the woods, avoiding bushy and grassy areas. Wear long pants and long-sleeved shirts and wear insect repellent containing DEET on exposed skin. After walking in wooded areas, thoroughly check the skin for ticks!  Today in 2021 CDC states “On August 10, 2020, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered nootkatone, an active ingredient discovered and developed by DVBD, for use in repellents and insecticides. CDC’s work with licensed partner, Evolva, demonstrates that nootkatone effectively repels and kills mosquitoes and ticks at rates similar to products already on the market. Commercial products using the ingredient could be available as early as 2022.”!!

QUOTE FOR FRIDAY:

“Aortic aneurysms can be hard to find because early symptoms often don’t exist. It’s only until the blood vessel ruptures that symptoms appear.  Most aneurysms come with few warnings signs until tearing or rupturing occurs.   Although aneurysms contribute to more than 25,000 deaths in the United States each year, it’s actually possible to live with and successfully treat an aortic aneurysm.  Early detection is vital, however.”.

Penn Medicine

Part II Aortic Aneurysms –What’s inside it? What are the risk factors in getting this? & the most common cause!

What is inside an aortic aneurysm?

The inside walls of aneurysms are often lined with a blood clot that forms because there is stagnant blood. The wall of an aneurysm is layered, like a piece of plywood.

Who is most likely to have an abdominal aortic aneurysm?

Abdominal aortic aneurysms tend to occur in white males over the age of 60. In the United States, these aneurysms occur in up to 3.0% of the population. Aneurysms start to form at about age 50 and peak at age 80. Women are less likely to have aneurysms than men and African Americans are less likely to have aneurysms than Caucasians.

There is a genetic component that predisposes one to developing an aneurysm; the prevalence in someone who has a first-degree relative with the condition can be as high as 25%.

Collagen vascular diseases that can weaken the tissues of the aortic walls are also associated with aortic aneurysms. These diseases include Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

What are risk factors for aortic aneurysms?

The risk factors for aortic aneurysm are the same as those for atherosclerotic heart disease, stoke, and peripheral artery disease and include:

  • Cigarette smoking: This not only increases the risk of developing an abdominal aortic aneurysm, but also increases the risk of aneurysm rupture. Aortic rupture is a life-threatening event where blood escapes the aorta and the patient can quickly bleed to death.
  • High blood pressure
  • Elevated blood cholesterol levels
  • Diabetes mellitus The most common cause of aortic aneurysms is “hardening of the arteries” called arteriosclerosis. At a majority of aortic aneurysms are from arteriosclerosis. The arteriosclerosis can weaken the aortic wall and the increased pressure of the blood being pumped through the aorta causes weakness of the inner layer of the aortic wall.
  • The aortic wall has three layers, the tunica adventitia, tunica media, and tunica intima. The layers add strength to the aorta as well as elasticity to tolerate changes in blood pressure. Chronically increased blood pressure causes the media layer to break down and leads to the continuous, slow dilation of the aorta.
  • What is the most common cause of aortic aneurysms?

Smoking is a major cause of aortic aneurysm. Studies have shown that the rate of aortic aneurysm has fallen at the same rate as population smoking rates.

Know a aneurysm can be located in different arteries, like the brain with the same common causes, risk factors and make up inside the aneurysm.

aortic aneurysm 2 

QUOTE FOR THURSDAY:

“On Sept. 12, 2003 — Popular TV and movie star John Ritter had died from an undetected flaw in his heart called an aortic dissection. An aortic aneurysm is an abnormal bulge that occurs in the wall of the major blood vessel (aorta) that carries blood from your heart to your body. Aortic aneurysms can occur anywhere in your aorta and may be tube-shaped (fusiform) or round (saccular). Aortic aneurysms include: Abdominal aortic aneurysm.  The aortic bifurcation is the point at which the abdominal aorta bifurcates (forks) into the left and right common iliac arteries. External iliac artery supplies the part of the abdominal wall and the lower limb. It has three major branches: inferior epigastric, deep circumflex iliac and femoral arteries.
MAYO CLINIC

Part I What is an aortic aneurysm?

aortic aneurysm 3aortic aneurysm 4aortic aeurysm 5

The aorta is the large artery that exits in the heart and delivers blood to the body. It begins at the aortic valve that separates the left ventricle of the heart from the aorta and prevents blood from leaking back into the left ventricle after a contraction, which is actually when the heart pumps blood. The various sections of the aorta are named based upon “arch-like” initial design and the location of the aorta in the body. Thus, the beginning of the aorta is referred to as the ascending aorta (basically meaning the blood going against resistance due to the vessel being a hill for the blood to go up), followed by the arch of the aorta, then the descending aorta (which is the blood going downward via gravity with the help of the heart pumping the blood of course). The portion of the aorta that is located in the chest (called thorax) is referred to as the thoracic aorta, while the abdominal aorta (the part of the aorta below the thorax region) is located in the abdomen. The abdominal aorta extends from the diaphragm (at the bottom of the lungs like a floor to divide the lungs from the organs in the abdomen) to the mid-abdomen where it splits into the iliac arteries and when it reaches the legs the femoral arteries now start which supplies to the legs oxygenated blood. This is why commonly a cardiac catheterization to visualize the aorta and sometimes the left side of the heart is done starting in the femoral artery since in time it diverts into starting the abdominal aorta.

An aneurysm is an area of a localized widening (dilation) of a blood vessel. The word “aneurysm” is borrowed from the Greek “aneurysma” meaning “a widening”.

An aortic aneurysm involves the aorta, the major artery that leaves the heart to supply blood to the body. An aortic aneurysm is a dilation or bulging of the aorta..

Most aortic aneurysms are fusiform. They are shaped like a spindle (“fusus” means spindle in Latin) with widening all around the circumference of the aorta. (Saccular aneurysms just involve a portion of the aortic wall with a localized out pocketing).

What is inside an aortic aneurysm?

The inside walls of aneurysms are often lined with a blood clot that forms because there is stagnant blood. The wall of an aneurysm is layered, like a piece of plywood.

Who is most likely to have an abdominal aortic aneurysm?

Abdominal aortic aneurysms tend to occur in white males over the age of 60. In the United States, these aneurysms occur in up to 3.0% of the population. Aneurysms start to form at about age 50 and peak at age 80. Women are less likely to have aneurysms than men and African Americans are less likely to have aneurysms than Caucasians.

There is a genetic component that predisposes one to developing an aneurysm; the prevalence in someone who has a first-degree relative with the condition can be as high as 25%.

Collagen vascular diseases that can weaken the tissues of the aortic walls are also associated with aortic aneurysms. These diseases include Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

Aortic aneurysms can develop anywhere along the length of the aorta but the majority are located in the abdominal aorta. Most of these abdominal aneurysms are located below the level of the renal arteries, the vessels that provide blood to the kidneys. Abdominal aortic aneurysms can extend into the iliac arteries.

What shape are most aortic aneurysms?

Most aortic aneurysms are fusiform. They are shaped like a spindle (“fusus” means spindle in Latin) with widening all around the circumference of the aorta. (Saccular aneurysms just involve a portion of the aortic wall with a localized out pocketing).

Stayed tune for Part II on Aortic Aneurysms tomorrow!

 

 

 

QUOTE FOR WEDNESDAY:

“Dry skin, itching, bruises, wrinkles, age spots, skin tags, skin cancer, and more can all happen to your skin as you get older. Your skin is the largest organ in the body, and it’s valuable to take the proper steps to keep your skin healthy. “

Dermatology Center (https://www.wvdermcenter.com)

Aging and Health Awareness Month!

Heart disease, cancer, stroke, chronic lower respiratory diseases, Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes continue to be leading causes of death among older adults, based on the Center for Disease Control & Prevention (saving lives and protecting people…CDC). They also provide the following:Baby Boomers for the next 25 years equating to over 70 million people can live longer lives with them combining to double the population of older Americans in the next quarter of a century. Baby Boomers can take steps to live long and healthy lives as opposed to a lot of their parents who died much younger. Living healthier will play a positive impact on the health care system. Starting a step towards prevention or treatment (Rx) of a present disease that you can improve is a mission we Americans owe to ourselves, our young ones, and to our nation’s future.

Through healthy dieting and behaviors (Ex. activity, nutrition, staying in your therapeutic body mass index, controlling stress both physically and mentally, oral health and dealing with any disability reaching the optimal health level you can reach) you can reach a healthier way to living. If the majority of our nation lives healthier, shows progress in promoting prevention, improving the health and well-being of older adults with reducing behaviors that contribute to premature death and disability will increase a healthier population in the U.S.

Baby boomers should do the following with starting good diet and exercise; start young!  Include with doing the following when your general practitioner recommends its time in your life later or even now for:

Getting Screened:

Get screened including flu vaccine, pneumonia vaccine, colorectal cancer screening, and mammography for women.

Mammography is the best available method to detect breast cancer in its earliest, most treatable stage before it is big enough to feel or cause symptoms. Women aged 50 and over should get mammograms every two years.

Colorectal cancer screening tests can find precancerous polyps so that they can be removed before they turn into cancer. They can also detect colorectal cancer early, when treatment works best. Older adults should be screened for colorectal cancer by having a fecal occult blood test during the past year or a colonoscopy within 10 years.

Get Vaccinated:

Flu and pneumonia is the seventh leading cause of death among adults 65 years or older, despite the availability of effective vaccines. Older adults should get the flu vaccine every year and get the pneumonia vaccine at least once.

Be Physically Active

Regular physical activity is one of the most important things older adults can do for their health. Physical activity can prevent many of the health problems that may come with age, including the risk of falls.

How Much Activity Do Older Adults Need?

2 hours and 30 minutes (150 minutes) of moderate-intensity aerobic activity (i.e., brisk walking) every week and muscle-strengthening activities for 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups.

OR

1 hour and 15 minutes (75 minutes) of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity (i.e., jogging or running) every week and muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups.

OR

An equivalent mix of moderate and vigorous-intensity aerobic activity and muscle strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups.

Eat Fruits and Vegetables Daily

Diets rich in fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of some cancers and chronic diseases, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Quit Smoking

Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States. For help visit www.smokefree.gov.

Take Medication for High Blood Pressure and Diabetes

High blood pressure & Diabetes is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, it’s one of the leading causes of illness and death among older adults. More than ½ of Americans don’t have their blood pressure under control.  Compliance is so essential in treating HTN, Diabetes or any disease including what your M.D. feels you need as a medication, if needed. The only way to find out is by seeing your health care providers, such as doctors, nurses, and pharmacists, who can track their patient’s blood pressure, prescribe once-a-day medications, and give clear instructions on how to take blood pressure & diabetic medications.

Take good care of your skin from childhood throughout your elder years.  Why?  Skin is the largest organ of the body and skin cancer is the easiest to treat when detected early and not blown off seeing the doctor.  Before that take care of the skin by: Wearing Sun Screen for protection from getting skin cancer!  Keep temperatures on average at room temperature and since hot temps dry out the skin.  Limit Sugar Intake. Overeating sugar can lead to wrinkles and sagging skin.  Get your beauty sleep. Adults need between seven and nine hours of sleep each night.  Sleep also gives your body time to refresh and renew itself. 

Patients should take the initiative or responsibility to monitor their blood pressure and sugar levels (finger sticks) between medical visits and know what abnormal values to report to their MD. Including taking their medications as prescribed, tell their doctor about any side effects, and make lifestyle changes, such as eating a low-sodium/low-calorie diet, exercising, and stopping smoking.

Do you want a better body, or a healthier society making our country America better overall?  Well here are a few tips in getting started:

  1. Positive Attitude – Keep a positive attitude through life. Focus on the positive, taking hold of any problems and addressing them properly and you will find that you will be happier in your life.
  2. Don’t “Act Your Age” – Forget that “number” – it’s only a number, after all!  Live life looking forward to activities and actions that make you smile and forget about your age!
  3. Be Proactive – Take charge of your health and research the many ways you can use your Health Insurance to take proactive steps in keeping healthy. You’re entitled to a variety of healthcare screenings as you get older; and it’s important to know exactly what tests and screenings you should behaving, based on your age and gender.
  4. Try Something New – It’s never too late to make changes and become a whole new you! Take up a new hobby, learn a language, take a class, or join a book club. Making your life interesting is one of the best ways to focus on healthy aging.
  5. Embrace Your Creativity – You may be surprised that you have an artistic side to you if you check out classes on painting, sketching or drawing. If your art talents are limited try adult coloring books that you can color with pencils.
  6. Surround Yourself With Positivity – Your mental health plays a very important part in healthy aging and surrounding yourself with people who make you smile and laugh makes healthy aging even easier.