The treatment (both non invasive and invasive) with the risks of Glaucoma-National awareness month for it.

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                                       Glaucoma-Table

If you are diagnosed with glaucoma, it is important to set a regular schedule of examinations with your eye doctor to monitor your condition and make sure that your prescribed treatment is effectively maintaining a safe eye pressure.

The Treatment of Glaucoma:

The damage caused by glaucoma can’t be reversed. But treatment and regular checkups can help slow or prevent vision loss, especially in you catch the disease in its early stage.

The goal of glaucoma treatment is to lower pressure in your eye (intraocular pressure). Depending on your situation, your options may include eyedrops, laser treatment or surgery.

 

Treatments and drugs

The damage caused by glaucoma can’t be reversed. But treatment and regular checkups can help slow or prevent vision loss, especially in you catch the disease in its early stage.

The goal of glaucoma treatment is to lower pressure in your eye (intraocular pressure). Depending on your situation, your options may include eyedrops, laser treatment or surgery.

Eyedrops

Glaucoma treatment often starts with prescription eyedrops. These can help decrease eye pressure by improving how fluid drains from your eye or by decreasing the amount of fluid your eye makes.

Prescription eyedrop medications include:

  • Prostaglandins. These increase the outflow of the fluid in your eye (aqueous humor) and reduce pressure in your eye. Examples include latanoprost (Xalatan) and bimatoprost (Lumigan). Possible side effects include mild reddening and stinging of the eyes, darkening of the iris, changes in the pigment of the eyelashes or eyelid skin, and blurred vision.
  • Beta blockers. These reduce the production of fluid in your eye, thereby lowering the pressure in your eye (intraocular pressure). Examples include timolol (Betimol, Timoptic) and betaxolol (Betoptic). Possible side effects include difficulty breathing, slowed heart rate, lower blood pressure, impotence and fatigue.
  • Alpha-adrenergic agonists. These reduce the production of aqueous humor and increase outflow of the fluid in your eye. Examples include apraclonidine (Iopidine) and brimonidine (Alphagan). Possible side effects include an irregular heart rate; high blood pressure; fatigue; red, itchy or swollen eyes; and dry mouth.
  • Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Rarely used for glaucoma, these drugs may reduce the production of fluid in your eye. Examples include dorzolamide (Trusopt) and brinzolamide (Azopt). Possible side effects include a metallic taste, frequent urination, and tingling in the fingers and toes.
  • Miotic or cholinergic agents. These increase the outflow of fluid from your eye. An example is pilocarpine (Isopto Carpine). Side effects include smaller pupils, possible blurred or dim vision, and nearsightedness.

Oral medications

If eyedrops alone don’t bring your eye pressure down to the desired level, your doctor may also prescribe an oral medication, usually a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. Possible side effects include frequent urination, tingling in the fingers and toes, depression, stomach upset, and kidney stones.

Surgery and other therapies

Other treatment options include laser therapy and various surgical procedures. Possible complications include pain, redness, infection, inflammation, bleeding, abnormally high or low eye pressure, and loss of vision. Some types of eye surgery may speed the development of cataracts.

 

The risks of Glaucoma:

Because chronic forms of glaucoma can destroy vision before any signs or symptoms are apparent, be aware of these risk factors:

  • Having high internal eye pressure (intraocular pressure)
  • Being over age 60
  • Being black or Hispanic
  • Having a family history of the condition
  • Having certain medical conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and sickle cell anemia
  • Having certain eye conditions, such as nearsightedness
  • Having had an eye injury or certain types of eye surgery
  • Early estrogen deficiency, such as can occur after removal of both ovaries (bilateral oophorectomy) before age 43
  • Taking corticosteroid medications, especially eyedrops, for a long time.

2 thoughts on “The treatment (both non invasive and invasive) with the risks of Glaucoma-National awareness month for it.

  1. Is the non-evasive method better than the evasive treatment? Most of the time surgery is a pretty good option but it sounds like it would be hard to do on an eyeball. I would probably choose the non-invasive method first.

    • Most MD’s would want you to go least invasive and if unsuccessful than go with a more invasive surgery unless its the best option. The only way to know that is go to an excellent MD regarding your eyes since there is no transplant for them and you want it done right. Do your research and NYC is one way to go. The NY eye and ear institute. Good Luck and thank you for reading my blog; please continue to do so with any questions.

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