Archive | March 2020

QUOTE FOR TUESDAY:

“Your kidneys and your circulatory system depend on each other for good health. The kidneys help filter wastes and extra fluids from blood, and they use a lot of blood vessels to do so. When the blood vessels become damaged, the nephrons (located in the kidneys) that filter your blood don’t receive the oxygen and nutrients they need to function well. This is why high blood pressure (HBP or hypertension) is the second leading cause of kidney failure.”

American Heart Association (AHA)

QUOTE FOR MONDAY:

“The Fields twins (Kirtsie & Catherine)started having problems when they were four years old. By the time they had reached the age of nine, they were having difficulty walking and needed frames to assist them with walking. Their muscles have been gradually deteriorating over time. The disease affects the twins’ nerves, causing them to make involuntary muscle movements such as trembling in the hands.  The girls have more than 100 muscle spasms a day which are uncontrollable & leave them in great pain.”

Anthony Rodriquez Author on Prezi (prezi.com)

Today’s topic is on “One of the top 5 rare diseases “Fields Condition”. Look at what we are up against in this major health crisis but we can get through this just like these 2 girls have been doing everyday since childhood!

You can be a positive force in resolving this coronavirus. Key element is help yourselves, family, and also your community! Be constructive in opening the doors by connecting with your community and help each other. Volunteer, get a job at opening positions to fight this! History has been through health devastation before and has beat it. Let’s fight it, take preventable precautions, stay home and know there is always hope! Apply these 2 unique girls positive thinking now being up against a complete change in normal daily living. PLEASE FOLLOW THE SOCIAL DISTANCING & BY NOW YOU KNOW WHY!

Dedicated to Kious Kelly Nurse Assistant Manager of 10B at Mount Sinai Hospital who did join the front lines with me in NYC! Kious your spirit lives on!

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In the top 5 rare diseases is “Fields Condition”.

 

Llanelli (St Elli‘s Parish“; Welsh pronunciation: [ɬaˈnɛɬi]) is the largest town in the county of Carmarthenshire and the preserved county of Dyfed, Wales. Located on the Loughor estuary, some 10 miles (16 km) north-west of Swansea and 12 miles (19 km) south-east of the county town, Carmarthen, Llanelli is famous for its rugby tradition and as a centre of tinplate production.  Several communities nearby the town are often included colloquially in Llanelli.

Fields’ disease is considered to be one of the rarest known diseases in the world, with only two diagnosed cases. The frequency of this disease is therefore 1 in approximately 3.75 billion (although since the disease manifested in identical twins, the actual frequency is 1 in approximately 7.5 billion).   It is named after Welsh twins Catherine and Kirstie Fields, of Llanelli. Fields’ disease is a neuromuscular disease, causing muscular degeneration.

The disease was first noticed when the twins were four. Doctors have been unable to identify it and have not been able to match it to any known diseases. As a result, the Fields sisters have undergone numerous tests, but no treatment has yet been found. No definitive cause has been determined, and doctors have generally concluded that they were born with it.

We’re definitely getting into the nitty-gritty of the world’s rarest diseases when we’re talking about Fields Condition, a progressive muscle disorder that affects two sisters (Kirstie & Catherine Fields) and can cause painful muscle spasms up to 100 times each day. The disease is still predominantly a mystery to doctors, but in its wake it’s paralyzed both sisters and cut off their ability to speak, with the two now relying on electronic speech machines to communicate.

The extent of this disease is still not very well known. This very disease has had not shown any effect on their brains or personalities up to now. There is still the uncertainty of not knowing that whether the disease is fatal or not or what is the life expectancy with this kind of disease. If the cause of this disease is considered to be somewhat genetic, then there are possibilities of the twins passing this disease to their offspring’s.

However, it is made clear that this disease is definitely not communicable. However, due to the rarity of this disease, there is still uncertainty and lack of any form or equipment for the cure of this disease.

Regarding the twins alive, the twins require the use of wheelchairs for mobility and are unable to speak without the assistance of electronic speaking aids. They experience persistent and painful muscle spasms which are worsened by emotional distress. They are currently living with their parents, with the assistance of hospice workers. Doctors continue to administer tests to the twins in search of a treatment.

At this point this is all we know about the fields’ disease as the doctors are still researching on it and have not been able to find much on it.

QUOTE FOR THE WEEKEND:

“Diabetic kidney disease is a type of kidney disease caused by diabetes. Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease. About 1 out of 4 adults with diabetes has kidney disease.  The main job of the kidneys is to filter wastes and extra water out of your blood to make urine. Your kidneys also help control blood pressure and make hormones that your body needs to stay healthy.”

National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Disease  (NIH)

Diabetes and Renal Failure

Diabetes is becoming more common in the United States. From 1980 through 2011, the number of Americans with diagnosed diabetes has more than tripled as of 2011 (from 5.6 million to 20.9 million). Do you know how much it is costing in our country?  Its a combination of factors that has caused such and increase in the disease of Diabetes in the U.S.  Factors:

-Look how much our population has increased with fast food companies pushing the  unhealthy foods the sell in restaurants or food stores.

-Also people from other countries who permanently came into America becoming a citizen from 1980 to now and came in to the U.S. already eating poor OR picked up the bad habits of eating poor foods that the U.S. media pushes that is acceptable to enough by U.S. society (that is continues) and is adding to the diabetic population whether they came in the U.S. with it or got it when coming to live in America.

-Than people born in U.S. with family having a history of diabetes or worse parents who did not watch good eating habits when raising their children who got obese putting them at high risk for diabetes.

-Ending line, these factors massively increased making the number of Diabetic Americans 3x higher since 1980.

-Than another factor is the illegals with diabetes also adds to the number of diabetic people in America; for they are not left out and are treated in hospitals with citizens.  If the come to an ER in the U.S. we treat them.

These factors all IMPACT an increase in the number of Diabetics in America!

Wake up America!  We need to get this disease under better control!  See how Diabetes keeps increasing in the U.S.?

That’s right. The metabolic condition is about as American as you can get, according to a national report card on diabetes by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2011.

The report shows that nearly half of Americans have diabetes or prediabetes, which puts them at high risk for the condition. A good number of these folks haven’t been diagnosed and don’t even realize their predicament.

People with diabetes have too much sugar in their blood. If the disease isn’t controlled, they can wind up with heart disease, nerve damage, kidney problems, eye damage and other serious health problems.

The new report combines data from the CDC, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Indian Health Service and the Census Bureau. Here’s a numerical look at what they reveal about diabetes in America.

30.3 million – The number of people in the U.S. who had diabetes in 2015.

That’s right. The metabolic condition is about as American as you can get, according to a new national report card on diabetes released Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

There are 2 types of Diabetes:

Type 1 diabetes was previously called insulin-dependent mellitus (IDDM) or juvenile-onset diabetes. This type of diabetes happens when the immune system ends up destroying beta cells in the body that come from our pancreas and they are the only cells in the human body that make the hormone INSULIN the regulates your glucose. Insulin allows glucose to transfer into the cells and tissues of our body to give them their energy to do their job in the body and nutrition to work properly=sugar-glucose. To live with this diabetes the person must have their insulin delivered by injection or a pump. This form of diabetes usually occurs in children or young adults but can occur at any age.

Type 2 diabetes was called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult-onset diabetes. In adults, type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90-95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. It usually begins as insulin resistance, a disease in which the cells do not use insulin properly due to the pancreas not making enough or the pancreas not secreting the correct form o of insulin to do its function. Ending line the insulin isn’t working properly. As the need for insulin rises, the pancreas gradually loses its ability to produce it.

Type 2 diabetes is associated with older age, OBESITY, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes, impaired glucose metabolism, physical inactivity and race/ethnicity.

Gestational diabetes is a form of glucose intolerance diagnosed during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes occurs more frequently among African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, and American Indians. It is also more common among obese women and women with a family history of diabetes. During pregnancy, gestational diabetes requires treatment to optimize maternal blood glucose levels to lessen the risk of complications in the infant.

Diabetes and Kidney Disease:

If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can damage your kidneys. Your kidneys clean your blood. If they are damaged, waste and fluids build up in your blood instead of leaving your body.

Kidney damage from diabetes is called diabetic nephropathy. It begins long before you have symptoms. People with diabetes should get regular screenings for kidney disease. Tests include a urine test to detect protein in your urine and a blood test to show how well your kidneys are working.

If the damage continues, your kidneys could fail. In fact, diabetes is the most common cause of kidney failure in the United States. People with kidney failure need either dialysis or a kidney transplant.

You can slow down kidney damage or keep it from getting worse. Controlling your blood sugar and blood pressure, taking your medicines and not eating too much protein can help with keeping your weight within normal limits.

 

QUOTE FOR FRIDAY:

“We are continuously learning about the unpredictable powers of nature. This is nowhere more true than in the continuous evolution of new infectious threats to human health that emerge – often without warning – from the natural environment. Already in these first two decades of the 21st century, the world has been sharply reminded time after time of the degree to which people in all countries and on all continents remain chronically vulnerable to infectious diseases, known and unknown.”

World Health Organizations (WHO)

QUOTE FOR THURSDAY:

“A person with a severe brain injury will need to be hospitalized and may have long-term problems affecting things such as:  Thinking, Memory, Learning, Coordination and balance, Speech, hearing or vision, Emotions it depends also on the lobe of the brain affected.”

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

QUOTE FOR WEDNESDAY:

“Over 3 decades, the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA) has proudly led the nation in observing Brain Injury Awareness Month by engaging public awareness campaign in March of each year. The theme for the 2018 to 2020 campaign is Change Your Mind.  Second impact syndrome, also termed “recurrent traumatic brain injury,” can occur when a person sustains a second traumatic brain injury before the symptoms of the first traumatic brain injury have healed. The second injury may occur from days to weeks following the first. ”

Brain Injury Association of America

QUOTE FOR TUESDAY:

‘The persistent eating, over a period of at least one month, of substances that are not food and do not provide nutritional value.  The ingestion of the substance(s) is not a part of culturally supported or socially normative practice (e.g., some cultures promote eating clay as part of a medicinal practice).  Typical substances ingested tend to vary with age and availability. They may include paper, soap, cloth, hair, string, wool, soil, chalk, talcum powder, paint, gum, metal, pebbles, charcoal, ash, clay, starch, or ice.”

National Eating Disorder Association-NEDA (www.nationaleatingdisorders.org)

 

QUOTE FOR MONDAY:

“Knowledge and preparation can help reduce feelings of panic,”. “Individuals can use information from trusted resources to develop personal plans of action.”

John Hopkins Medicine