Archive | May 2021

QUOTE FOR THE WEEKEND:

“The good news is that if skin cancer is caught early, your dermatologist can treat it with little or no scarring and high odds of eliminating it entirely. Often, the doctor may even detect the growth at a precancerous stage, before it has become a full-blown skin cancer or penetrated below the surface of the skin.’

Skin Cancer Foundation

Part III Skin Cancer Awareness – Akinetic Keratosis & Keratoacanthoma.

Continuation of Types of skin cancer:

 

5-Akinetic Keratosis:

Actinic keratosis (AK) is a skin disorder that causes rough, scaly patches of skin. Another name for AK is solar keratosis. AK is a type of precancer, which means that if you don’t treat the condition, it could turn into cancer. Without treatment, AK can lead to a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma.

A condition which causes scaly patches on the skin from exposure to the sun over the years. It is commonly found on face, lips, ears, neck, back of the hand and forearms.  Very common (More than 3 million cases per year in US)
Rarely requires lab test or imaging.  Treatable by a medical professional.  Can last several months or years.
Knowing the causes, risk factors and warning signs can help you detect them early, when they are easiest to treat and cure.

The risk factors of Akinetic Keratosis are:

UV exposure from the sun or indoor tanning.

-History of skin cancer in particular history of actinic keratosis.

– Age over 40.

-Fair skin: People with fair skin including lighter color hair or eyes have an increased risk.

Warning Signs can help with early detection and treatment this can be successfully removed without complications. Look out for any new, changing or unusual skin growths, so you can spot skin cancers like BCC when they are easiest to treat and cure.

 

6-Keratoacanthoma (KA)

This is a slow growing cancer of the skin that looks like a dome or crater.  This is common; more than 200,000 cases per year in US.  Regarding treatment from medical professional is advised.  This condition often requires lab test or imaging.  Keratoacanthoma last several months.  It is common for ages 60 and older and is more common in males.
KA is benign despite its similarities to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), or the abnormal growth of cancerous cells on the skin’s most outer layer. KA originates in the skin’s hair follicles and rarely spreads to other cells.  Commonly found in face, neck, hands, arm, and legs.
The risk factors of Keratocanthoma (KA):

UV exposure from the sun or indoor tanning.

-contact with chemical carcinogens, or cancer-causing chemicals

 -trauma 

-Infection with some strains of a wart virus, such as papillomavirus

-History of skin cancer in particular history of Keratoacanthoma.

Age over 60.

-People with fair skin.

Warning Signs can help with early detection and treatment, this can be successfully removed without complications if caught early. Look out for any new, changing or unusual skin growths, so you can spot skin cancers like BCC when they are easiest to treat and cure.

 

QUOTE FOR FRIDAY:

“Skin cancer is by far the most common type of cancer. If you have skin cancer, it is important to know which type you have because it affects your treatment options and your outlook (prognosis). If you aren’t sure which type of skin cancer you have, ask your doctor so you can get the right information.”

American Cancer Society

Part II Skin Cancer Awareness – Squamous Cell Carcinoma & Merkel Cell Carcinoma

Continuation of Types of Skin Cancer:

 

3-Squamous cell carcinoma – SCC

Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common form of skin cancer in the United States. It accounts for about 15 percent of all skin cancers.  It is caused due to over production of skin cells. Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is caused by DNA damage that leads to abnormal changes (mutations) in the squamous cells in the outermost layer of skin. This cancer is common (More than 200,000 cases per year in US).  The majority of squamous cell skin cancers are easily and successfully treated with current therapies.

Knowing the causes, risk factors and warning signs can help you detect them early, when they are easiest to treat and cure.

The risk factors of Squamous Cell Carcinoma are:

UV exposure from the sun or indoor tanning.

-History of skin cancer, including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or melanoma

– Age over 50: Most BCCs appear in people over age 50.

-Fair skin: People with fair skin have an increased risk.

Warning Signs can help with early detection and treatment this can be successfully removed without complications. Look out for any new, changing or unusual skin growths, so you can spot skin cancers like BCC when they are easiest to treat and cure.

IT’S A FACT, Squamous cell carcinoma is considered more aggressive than basal cell carcinoma.  If squamous cell carcinoma does spread to internal organs it can be life threatening. The quicker the treatment when SCC is in the one layer of skin only the better the results.  The primary symptom to look out for with SCC is a growing bump or lesion on the skin which has a rough scaly surface or flat red patches.

 

 

4-Merkel Cell Carcinoma

This is a type of skin cancer characterized by flesh-colored nodule that occurs on the face, head or neck. It begins in the cells at the base of the uppermost layer of the skin (epidermis).  A normal Merkel cell is a cross between a nerve cell and an endocrine (or hormone-producing) cell located on or just below the skin in the underlying tissue, and functions predominantly as a touch receptor. Merkel cell carcinoma occurs when these cells begin to grow uncontrollably.

Merkel cell tumors typically arise on, but are not limited to, sun-exposed parts of the body such as the face and neck. Their shape and color are less distinctive than other skin cancers, and they can often appear as an innocent pink pearly nodule. As a result, it is usually only the speed with which they grow that attracts the attention of patients and their doctors.

With early detection and treatment, Merkel cell carcinoma can be well contained and even cured. Treatment becomes more difficult as the tumor grows and spreads, but aggressive therapy can still lead to high rates of survival.

Again, Warning Signs can help with early detection and treatment this can be successfully removed without complications. Look out for any new, changing or unusual skin growths, so you can spot skin cancers like BCC when they are easiest to treat and cure.

Risk Factors of Merkel Cell Carcinoma:

UV exposure from the sun or indoor tanning.

-History of skin cancer, including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or melanoma

– Age over 50: Most BCCs appear in people over age 50.

-Fair skin: People with fair skin have an increased risk.

-Male gender: Men are more likely to develop BCC.

-Chronic infections and skin inflammation from burns, scars and other conditions-weakens the immune system.

-Merkel Cell Virus.  Recently, researchers have linked a virus to many cases of Merkel cell carcinoma. However, it remains to be determined if the Merkel cell polyomarvirus causes the disease, and if it might help guide future treatment. If so, the virus could offer promising new targets for immunotherapy.

IT’S A FACT, Memorial Sloan Kettering Hospital in NYC states  “Merkel cell carcinoma, also called neuroendocrine cancer of the skin, is an aggressive type of skin cancer that affects only about 400 people in the United States each year. But like other skin cancers, that number is growing.”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.Basal Cell Carcinoma

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common form of skin cancer and the most frequently occurring form of all cancers. In the U.S. alone, an estimated 3.6 million cases are diagnosed each year. BCCs arise from abnormal, uncontrolled growth of basal cells.  Basal Cell Carcinoma grows slowly, most are curable and cause minimal damage when caught and treated early.

Knowing the causes, risk factors and warning signs can help you detect them early, when they are easiest to treat and cure.

The risk factors of BCC are:

UV exposure from the sun or indoor tanning.

-History of skin cancer, including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or melanoma

– Age over 50: Most BCCs appear in people over age 50.

-Fair skin: People with fair skin have an increased risk.

-Male gender: Men are more likely to develop BCC.

-Chronic infections and skin inflammation from burns, scars and other conditions.

Warning Signs can help with early detection and treatment, almost all basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) can be successfully removed without complications. Look out for any new, changing or unusual skin growths, so you can spot skin cancers like BCC when they are easiest to treat and cure.

IT’S A FACT 90% of nonmelanoma skin cancers (mainly BCCs and SCCs) are associated with exposure to UV radiation from the sun.

QUOTE FOR THURSDAY:

“Skin cancer — the abnormal growth of skin cells — most often develops on skin exposed to the sun. But this common form of cancer can also occur on areas of your skin not ordinarily exposed to sunlight.

There are three major types of skin cancer — basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.”

MAYO CLINIC

Part I Skin Cancer Awareness

  BASAL CELL CARCINONA

 

 

Skin cancer — the abnormal growth of skin cells — most often develops on skin exposed to the sun. But this common form of cancer can also occur on areas of your skin not ordinarily exposed to sunlight.

There are three major types of skin cancer — basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

You can reduce your risk of skin cancer by limiting or avoiding exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Checking your skin for suspicious changes can help detect skin cancer at its earliest stages. Early detection of skin cancer gives you the greatest chance for successful skin cancer treatment.

There are different types of skin cancer, which are:

1.Basal Cell Carcinoma

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common form of skin cancer and the most frequently occurring form of all cancers. In the U.S. alone, an estimated 3.6 million cases are diagnosed each year. BCCs arise from abnormal, uncontrolled growth of basal cells.  Basal Cell Carcinoma grows slowly, most are curable and cause minimal damage when caught and treated early.

Knowing the causes, risk factors and warning signs can help you detect them early, when they are easiest to treat and cure.

The risk factors of BCC are:

UV exposure from the sun or indoor tanning.

-History of skin cancer, including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or melanoma

– Age over 50: Most BCCs appear in people over age 50.

-Fair skin: People with fair skin have an increased risk.

-Male gender: Men are more likely to develop BCC.

-Chronic infections and skin inflammation from burns, scars and other conditions.

Warning Signs can help with early detection and treatment, almost all basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) can be successfully removed without complications. Look out for any new, changing or unusual skin growths, so you can spot skin cancers like BCC when they are easiest to treat and cure.

IT’S A FACT 90% of nonmelanoma skin cancers (mainly BCCs and SCCs) are associated with exposure to UV radiation from the sun.

2. Melanoma

Melanoma is a type of cancer that usually begins in the skin. Specifically, it begins in cells called melanocytes. These are cells that produce melanin. Melanin is the pigment that gives skin, hair, and eyes their color.

Melanoma is among the most serious forms of skin cancer. 

Melanoma is the deadliest type of skin cancer. It can be “in situ” which means that the cancer is confined to the top layer of skin, thus being highly curable. It can also be “malignant” which means that the cancer can spread to other parts of the body which significantly decreases the survivability rate. Melanoma in situ can grow to be malignant melanoma if not treated. The key to surviving melanoma is early detection, and especially before it becomes malignant. Melanoma caught in the early stages of its development is highly curable with a 97% survival rate.

Risk Factors of Melanoma are:

-Ultraviolet light exposure

-Moles

-Fair skin, freckling, light hair

-Family history of melanoma

-Personal history of melanoma or skin cancers

-Having a weakened immune response

-Being older

-Being male

-Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP): This is a rare, inherited condition that affects skin cells’ ability to repair damage to their DNA. People with XP have a high risk of developing melanoma and other skin cancers when they are young, especially on sun-exposed areas of their skin.

Again warning signs can count help with early detection and treatment this can be successfully removed without complications. Look out for any new, changing or unusual skin growths, so you can spot skin cancers like BCC when they are easiest to treat and cure.

IT’S A FACT Only 20-30% of melanomas are found in existing moles.  While 70-80% arise on normal-looking skin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

QUOTE FOR WEDNESDAY:

“In 2018, 1 in every 6 deaths from cardiovascular disease was due to stroke.  Someone in the United States has a stroke every 40 seconds. Every 4 minutes, someone dies of stroke.  Every year, more than 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke. About 610,000 of these are first or new strokes.”

Center for Disease Control and Prevention

QUOTE FOR TUESDAY:

“A stroke occurs when blood flow to the brain is blocked. Blood brings oxygen and nutrients to the cells. Without blood, brain cells die. This means that a section of the brain starts breaking down and brain function is altered. The quicker a stroke is addressed, the less brain damage there will be and the better the recovery. Strokes are usually painless, but there are signs.”

HealthPrep

QUOTE FOR MONDAY:

“Stroke is a disease that affects the arteries leading to and within the brain. It is the No. 5 cause of death and a leading cause of disability in the United States.

A stroke occurs when a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or bursts (or ruptures). When that happens, part of the brain cannot get the blood (and oxygen) it needs, so it and brain cells die.”

American Stroke Association

QUOTE FOR THE WEEKEND:

“Though it’s a progressive disease, there are no officially-defined stages of ALS. Not everyone experiences the same symptoms in exactly the same order, and the disease progresses more slowly in some people than others.

In general, though, the progression of ALS can be divided up into three stages: early, middle, and late.”

ALS Association Texas Chapter