Prevent Measles Epidemics, common sense Vaccines!

Measles

It isn’t just a little rash

Measles can be dangerous, especially for babies and young children.

Measles symptoms typically include:

  • High fever (may spike to more than 104° F)
  • Cough
  • Runny nose
  • Red, watery eyes
  • Rash breaks out 3-5 days after symptoms begin

Measles Are Serious especially letting anyone with it  just go in public and allowing other people to be exposed to it with spreading the illness on to others causing a possible epidemic; like in Rockland County now.  WHY has this happened since parents, particularly Hasidic Jewish but there are others in communities not getting vaccines against measles.  Foolish for their children and no concern for their community in prevention of them getting measles.  That is just not right.

About 1 out of 4 people who get measles will be hospitalized.

1 out of every 1,000 people with measles will develop brain swelling due to infection (encephalitis), which may lead to brain damage.

1 or 2 out of 1,000 people with measles will die, even with the best care.

You have the power to protect your yourself and your child.

Provide your children with safe and long-lasting protection against measles by making sure they get the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine according to CDC’s recommended immunization schedule.  Be a responsible parent and citizen in the United States.

Complications

Measles can be a serious in all age groups. However, children younger than 5 years of age and adults older than 20 years of age are more likely to suffer from measles complications.

Common Complications

Common measles complications include ear infections and diarrhea.

  • Ear infections occur in about one out of every 10 children with measles and can result in permanent hearing loss.
  • Diarrhea is reported in less than one out of 10 people with measles.

Severe Complications

Some people may suffer from severe complications, such as pneumonia (infection of the lungs) and encephalitis (swelling of the brain). They may need to be hospitalized and could die.

  • As many as one out of every 20 children with measles gets pneumonia, the most common cause of death from measles in young children.
  • About one child out of every 1,000 who get measles will develop encephalitis (swelling of the brain) that can lead to convulsions and can leave the child deaf or with intellectual disability.
  • For every 1,000 children who get measles, one or two will die from it.

Measles may cause pregnant woman to give birth prematurely, or have a low-birth-weight baby.

Long-term Complications

Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a very rare, but fatal disease of the central nervous system that results from a measles virus infection acquired earlier in life. SSPE generally develops 7 to 10 years after a person has measles, even though the person seems to have fully recovered from the illness. Since measles was eliminated in 2000, SSPE is rarely reported in the United States.

Among people who contracted measles during the resurgence in the United States in 1989 to 1991, 4 to 11 out of every 100,000 were estimated to be at risk for developing SSPE. The risk of developing SSPE may be higher for a person who gets measles before they are two years of age.

Be responsible to yourself, to your child and to your community get the VACCINE for measles to prevent yourself, your child and your community getting measles.  Vaccines prevent you getting the measles, what is so hard to understand and no God in his right mind would condemn you for getting vaccines for yourself, children and community.  There surely was no vaccines invented when God existed, just do your research.

QUOTE FOR TUESDAY:

 

“Epilepsy and seizures can develop in any person at any age. Seizures and epilepsy are more common in young children and older people.

  • About 1 in 100 people in the U.S. has had a single unprovoked seizure or has been diagnosed with epilepsy.
  • 1 in 26 people will develop epilepsy in their lifetime”

Epilepsy Foundation

 

Part III National Epilepsy Awareness: Types of Seizures, and Types of Treatments for Epilepsy/Seizures!

 

 

Types of seizures whether with a etiology or unknown:

I-Partial seizures (seizures beginning local)

1-simple partial seizures-(the person is conscious and not impaired).  With motor symptoms, autonomic symptoms and even psychic symptoms.

2.)-Complex partial seizures-(the person is with impairment of consciousness)

II-Generalized seizures-(bilaterally symmetrical and without local onset).

3.) Tonic clonic seizures – Grand Mal

Treatment:

1-Epilepsy is sometimes referred to as a long-term condition, as people often live with it for many years, or for life. Although generally epilepsy cannot be ‘cured’, for most people, seizures can be ‘controlled’ (stopped) so that epilepsy has little or no impact on their lives. So treatment is often about managing seizures in the long-term.

Most people with epilepsy take anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) to stop their seizures from happening. However, there are other treatment options for people whose seizures are not controlled by anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs).

2-The ketogenic diet is one treatment option for children with epilepsy whose seizures are not controlled with AEDs. The diet may help to reduce the number or severity of seizures and can often have positive effects on behaviour.

3-Vagus nerve stimulation therapy is a treatment for epilepsy that involves a stimulator (or ‘pulse generator’) which is connected, inside the body, to the left vagus nerve in the neck. The stimulator send regular, mild electrical stimulations through this nerve to help calm down the irregular electrical brain activity that leads to seizures.

There are several ways to treat epilepsy. How well each treatment works varies from one person to another. Vagus nerve stimulation therapy is a form of treatment for people with epilepsy whose seizures are not controlled with medication.

4-There are different kinds of epilepsy surgery. One kind of surgery involves removing a specific area of the brain which is thought to be causing the seizures. Another kind involves separating the part of the brain that is causing seizures from the rest of the brain.

Surgery may be possible for both adults and children, and might be considered if:

  • you have tried several AEDs and none of them have stopped or significantly reduced your seizures; and
  • a cause for your epilepsy can be found in a specific area of your brain, and this is an area where surgery is possible.

Whether you are suitable for surgery is something that you may like to talk about with your GP or neurologist. If you meet these criteria and are considered for surgery, you will need to have further tests before you can have the surgery.

If you are referred for surgery you will probably go to a specialist centre for tests. There are many different pre-surgical tests you might have before you can be given the go-ahead for surgery. This could include further MRI scans, an EEG (electroencephalogram) and video telemetry (an EEG while also being filmed). Other types of scans may also be done, which trace a chemical injected into the body. This can show detailed information about where seizures start in the brain.

Memory and psychological tests are also used to see how your memory and lifestyle might be affected after the surgery. These types of tests also help the doctors to see how you are likely to cope with the impact of having this type of surgery.

The tests will confirm whether:

  • the surgeons can reach the epileptogenic lesion during surgery and can remove it safely without causing new problems;
  • other parts of your brain could be affected by the surgery, for example the parts that control your speech, sight, movement or hearing;
  • you have a good chance of having your seizures stopped by the surgery; and
  • you have any other medical conditions that would stop you from having this kind of surgery.

The results from the pre-surgical tests will help you and your neurologist decide whether surgery is an option for you, and what the result of the surgery might be.

your specialist will also talk with you about the possible risks and benefits of having surgery.

For many people the results show that surgery is not an option: the majority of people who are recommended for surgery, and have these tests carried out, are unable to have surgery.

Take the action and make your life one without seizures occurring putting your life on HOLD you need to TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF!    That is all up to you, the patient diagnosed with it or questioning if they have seizures.

QUOTE FOR MONDAY:

“Epilepsy is the fourth most common neurological disorder and affects people of all ages.

  • Epilepsy means the same thing as “seizure disorders.”
  • Epilepsy is characterized by unpredictable seizures and can cause other health problems.
  • Epilepsy is a spectrum condition with a wide range of seizure types and control varying from person-to-person.
  • Public misunderstandings of epilepsy cause challenges that are often worse than the seizures.”

Epilepsy Foundation

Part II National Epilepsy Awareness: Continuation on causes and how its diagnosed.

 

Part II covers what is Idiopathic Epilepsy (Unknown Cause), how to diagnose this condition!

Their epilepsy that is diagnosed with a IDIOPATHIC cause – meaning unknown cause and the patient could grow out of it in childhood in some cases (not all) depending on the type of seizure disorder and if the child doesn’t grow out of it the condition becomes chronic (for life).

Although heredity has been known since antiquity to cause epilepsy, the progress to date in identifying the genetic basis of epilepsy has been limited primarily to the discovery of single gene mutations that cause epilepsy in relatively rare families. For the more common types of epilepsy, heredity plays a subtler role, and it is thought that a combination of mutations in multiple genes likely determine an individual’s susceptibility to seizures, as well as the responsiveness to antiepileptic medications.

Epilepsy can be caused by genetic factors (inherited) or acquired (a etiology—cause) , although in most cases it arises in part from both. The neurology and neurological sciences of Stanford Epilepsy Center Dr. Robert S. Fischer Ph D. presents in the article Genetic Causes of Epilepsy.

He also presents in this article our genes are the instruction set for building the human body. Genes reside on chromosomes.

Going to the basics is every person has 46 chromosomes, carrying a total of about 30,000 genes. We get half our chromosomes from our mother and half from our father. While genes determine the structure of our body, they also control the excitability of our brain cells. Defective genes can make hyperexcitable brain cells, which are prone to seizures.

In recent years, several epilepsy conditions have been linked to mutations in genes, but the matter is complicated by the fact that different genes may be involved in different circumstances.

In general, the most common epilepsy conditions, including partial seizures, seem to be more acquired than genetic.

Gene testing will soon be able to identify predispositions to epilepsy, allowing doctors to help a patient get treatment and to assist with family counseling. One day, doctors may simply be able to swap a patient’s cheek, test his or her genes, and predict response to various epilepsy medicines, eliminating much of the trial and error in medication choice that goes on today. Eventually, we may even be able to repair or replace defective genes that predispose a person to epilepsy, a process called gene therapy.

Lastly, Dr. Robert Fischer Ph D presented in his article, that I found very interesting, the general population has about a 1% risk of developing epilepsy.  Meanwhile, children of mothers with epilepsy have a 3 to 9% risk of inheriting this disease, while children of fathers have a 1.5 to 3% risk of inheritence. Still, the actual risk is upon the specific type of epilepsy. For example, partial seizures are less likely to run in families than are generalized seizures. In any event, with the usual forms of epilepsy, even if a parent does have the condition, there is more than a 90% chance that their child will not. So most epilepsies are acquired than inherited.

Clearly, genes determine a great deal of who we are, including our possible risk for epilepsy but slim versus a actual cause. But what happens to us in life and what we do is still the larger part of the risk for epilepsy.

A person given this diagnosis in the 1970’s, or before  and even up to the early 1990’s was quiet about ever letting people know about this since in the 1970’s and back with lack of knowledge, information to the public and definitely technology versus now.  Epilepsy is much more an accepted disease in the overall community compared to 20-25 years ago and back.  Heck in the 1970’s and back these patients when having a seizure episode were characterized as “Freaks”.  This was due to ignorance and lack of information to society/community but due to the past 20 to 25 years with the computer used more as a must in our lives with media, television and even our government they all have made it possible for society everywhere in the world to learn and understand diseases with acceptance in wanting to help those, particularly the US, but we still need a healthier America. It will take time to get there with the many multicultural lives that all live in the U.S. which practice differently on how important a healthy diet is with exercise balanced with rest.  Also including stress well controlled is not always in America on their top priority list in living.  Stress can even be a catalyst for a seizure but not the cause.

For a person diagnosed with or without a cause of epilepsy these steps in learning about the disease with higher technology and continuous research with medications over the years has allowed them to be able to live a completely healthy life doing the same things other people do without the disease but only if the patient is UNDER COMPLETE CONTROL  which includes being COMPLIANT with your Rx; this does exist in America.

Compliant meaning taking their medications everyday as ordered by their neurologist with yearly or sooner follow-up visits with blood levels of the anti-seizure medications there on.  This is the only way one with chronic epilepsy is guaranteed that living this way MAY stop the seizures from occurring (inactive epilepsy you can call it — meaning you’ll always have the disease but can put the seizure activity in a remission by medications preventing the seizure.)

How Epilepsy is Diagnosed:

The purpose for intial visits is for the Neurologist to determine if the patient is having a seizure or something else and to determine what diagnotic tooling tests to start with to help the doctor to find out the problem.  Apart from the description of the seizure, there are other things that can help to explain why your seizures have happened. Your medical history and any other medical conditions will also be considered as part of your diagnosis.

If you have a seizure you may not remember what has happened. It can be helpful to have a description of what happened from someone who saw your seizure, to pass on to your GP or specialist.

Here are some questions that may help you or someone who witnessed your seizure to record useful information about what happened.

Before the seizure

  • Did anything trigger (set off) the seizure – for example, did you feel tired, hungry, or unwell?
  • Did you have any warning that the seizure was going to happen?
  • Did your mood change – for example, were you excited, anxious or quiet?
  • Did you make any sound, such as crying out or mumbling?
  • Did you notice any unusual sensations, such as an odd smell or taste, or a rising feeling in your stomach?
  • Where were you and what were you doing before the seizure?

During the seizure

  • Did you appear to be ‘blank’ or stare into space?
  • Did you lose consciousness or become confused?
  • Did you do anything unusual such as mumble, wander about or fiddle with your clothing?
  • Did your colour change (become pale or flushed) and if so, where (face or lips)?
  • Did your breathing change (for example, become noisy or look difficult)?
  • Did any part of your body move, jerk or twitch?
  • Did you fall down, or go stiff or floppy?
  • Did you wet yourself?
  • Did you bite your tongue or cheek?

After the seizure

  • How did you feel after the seizure – did you feel tired, worn out or need to sleep?
  • How long was it before you were able to carry on as normal?
  • Did you notice anything else?

For F/U (follow up) visits is for the neurologist to see how well your seizures are under control by taking drug blood levels of the anti seizure medication your taking to make sure the medication is in a therapeutic drug level and if not he or she will make dose changes in the med(s) your on.  Possible do a EEG (electroencephalogram); the only test to decipher if you have spikes in your brain waves indicating you had a seizure determining from which lobe of the brain is having the seizures (a 26 lead to wires on the brain, which is painless).  Go to the expert for keeping you on the right track.  Its just like based on the principle why a person gets a check up on there car by seeing the mechanic (the car’s doctor) who fixes it.  The expert the Neurologist fix your seizures or get them under control.

 

QUOTE FOR THE WEEKEND:

“Epilepsy is a central nervous system (neurological) disorder in which brain activity becomes abnormal, causing seizures or periods of unusual behavior, sensations, and sometimes loss of awareness.

Anyone can develop epilepsy. Epilepsy affects both males and females of all races, ethnic backgrounds and ages.  Seizure symptoms can vary widely.

At least two unprovoked seizures are generally required for an epilepsy diagnosis.”

MAYO Clinic

Epilepsy

    

Most people with epilepsy are otherwise healthy; as long as it is controlled like most other diseases.  A seizure is a physical manifestation of paroxysmal and abnormal electrical firing of neurons in the brain.  Think of it as numerous voltage (hyperexcitability of neurons) going throughout the brain meaning brain waves going in all directions with the brain saying its too much activity causing the brain to go into a seizure.

When the seizure occurs there is a decrease in oxygen since the brain isn’t capable to send messages during the seizure.  If the seizure continues to repeat one right after another the person is in status epilepticus and if the seizures doesn’t stop the person can lead to a neuronal death;  like John Travolta’s son who died of this.

The term seizure disorder may refer to any number of conditions that result in such a paroxysmal electrical discharge.  These conditons could be metabolic or structural in nature.   Epilepsy is the term for those who have a second seizure that occurs spontaneously and without preceding metabolic or structural cause for the occurrence.  Epilepsy is a chronic disorder that requires antiepileptic drug therapy; usually thorough out life.

Etiology of Epilepsy is generally a sign of underlying pathology involving the brain.  It may be the first sign of nervous system disease (ex. Brain tumor), or it may be a sign of a systemic or metabolic derangement.

Metabolic and Systemic Causes of Seizures:

a.) Electrolyte Imbalance=Acidosis, heavy metal poisoning, Hypocalcemia, Hypocapnea, Hypoglycemia, Hypoxia, Sodium-Potassium imbalance, Systemic  diseases (liver, renal failure, etc…) Toxemia of pregnancy, and water intoxication.

b.) Infections like meningitis, encephalitis, brain abcess.

c.) Withdrawal of sedative-hypnotic drugs=Alcohol, Antiepileptic drugs, Barbiturates, Benzodiazepines.

d.) Iatrogenic drug overdose=Theopylline, Penicillin.

Other causes of epilepsy can be Trauma, Heredity.

Structural causes of epilepsy:

Head trauma/Degenerative Disease like Alzheimer’s or Creutfeldz-Jacob or Huntington’s Chorea or Multiple Sclerosis or Pick’s Disease. There is also tumors or genetic disease or Stroke or Infections or Febrile seizures.

Types of seizures

I-Partial seizures (seizures beginning local)

1-simple partial seizures-(the person is conscious and not impaired).  With motor symptoms, autonomic symptoms and even psychic symptoms.

2.)-Complex partial seizures-(the person is with impairment of consciousness)

II-Generalized seizures-(bilaterally symmetrical and without local onset).

3.) Tonic clonic seizures – Grand Mal

 

QUOTE FOR THURSDAY:

“Genital warts are one of the most common types of sexually transmitted infections. Nearly all sexually active people will become infected with at least one type of human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes genital warts, at some point during their lives. Women are somewhat more likely than men to develop genital warts.

As the name suggests, genital warts affect the moist tissues of the genital area. Genital warts may look like small, flesh-colored bumps or have a cauliflower-like appearance. In many cases, the warts are too small to be visible.”

MAYO Clinic

What are genital warts?

 

Genital warts (or condylomata acuminata, venereal warts, anal warts and anogenital warts)

Genital warts affect both men and women and can occur at any age.

Most patients with genital warts are between the ages of 17-33 years. Genital warts are highly contagious. There is high risk of getting the infection from a single sexual contact with someone who has genital warts.

In children younger than three years of age, genital warts are thought to be transmitted by nonsexual methods such as direct manual contact. Nevertheless, the presence of genital warts in children should raise the suspicion for sexual abuse.

Up to 20% of people with genital warts will have other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

Most genital warts are caused by two specific types of the virus (HPV-6 and -11), and these HPV types are considered “low risk,” meaning they have a low cancer-causing potential. Other HPV types are known causes of premalignant changes and cervical cancers in women. HPV16, one of the “high-risk” types, is responsible for about 50% of cervical cancers. HPV types 16, 18, 31, and 45 are other known “high risk” virus types. High-risk HPV types are also referred to as oncogenic HPV types. HPV is believed to cause 100% of cases of cervical cancer..

Genital warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Over 100 types of HPVs have been identified; about 40 of these types have the potential to infect the genital area.

Most genital warts are caused by two specific types of the virus (HPV-6 and -11), and these HPV types are considered “low risk,” meaning they have a low cancer-causing potential. Other HPV types are known causes of premalignant changes and cervical cancers in women. HPV16, one of the “high-risk” types, is responsible for about 50% of cervical cancers. HPV types 16, 18, 31, and 45 are other known “high risk” virus types. High-risk HPV types are also referred to as oncogenic HPV types. HPV is believed to cause 100% of cases of cervical cancer.

The viral particles are able to penetrate the skin and mucosal surfaces through microscopic abrasions in the genital area, which occur during sexual activity. Once cells are invaded by HPV, a latency (quiet) period of months to years may occur, during which there is no evidence of infection.

Genital warts are indirectly associated with use of birth control pills due to increased sexual contact without the use of barrier protection, multiple sex partners, and having sex at an early age.

The size may range from less than one millimeter (1 mm = 0.039 inches) across to several square centimeters (1 cm = 0.39 inches) when many warts join together.

Rarely, bleeding or urinary obstruction may be the initial problem when the wart involves the urethral opening (the opening where urine exits the body.)

There may be a history of previous or concurrent sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).In men, genital warts can infect the urethra, penis, scrotum, and rectal area. The warts can appear as soft, raised masses with a surface that can be smooth (on the penile shaft) or rough with many fingerlike projections (anal warts). Others may appear pearly, cauliflower-like, or rough with a slightly dark surface. Most lesions are raised, but some may be flat with only slight elevation above the skin surface. Sometimes lesions may be hidden by hair or in the inner aspect of the uncircumcised foreskin in males.

Diagnosis:

It is often based on findings from the history and appearance of the genital warts. Magnification of the area (colposcopy) using a scope may be necessary to see the lesions. In females, a colposcope may be used to look for lesions in the vaginal canal and on the cervix. A biopsy can be performed if the lesion appears unusual or recurs after treatment. Because genital warts essentially have no symptoms other than their appearance, there is little need for home treatment. It is important, however, to recognize that the warts exist. Be careful to prevent transmission to a sexual partner.

Treatment:

#1 before even getting genital herpes and stick PREVENTION!! Never get them.

Cryotherapy:  This technique freezes the wart using liquid nitrogen or a “cryoprobe.” It is an excellent first-line treatment because response rates are high with few side effects.

Electrodesiccation:  This technique uses an electric current to destroy the warts. It can be done in the office with local anesthesia. Of note, the resulting smoke plume may be infectious.

Surgery in some cases removing the warts.

Complete the necessary treatment as outlined by your health care practitioner

There is also alternative treatments:

*Types of medical creams prescribed and even OTC.  Again please with the all topical creams it is vital to complete the treatment as ordered by your doctor!

*Laser treatment – This treatment is used for extensive or recurrent genital warts. It may require local, regional, or general anesthesia. The laser physically destroys the HPV-induced lesion. Disadvantages include high cost, increased healing time, scarring, and potentially infectious viral particles in the air caused by the laser plume (hydrodynamics).

There is no single effective cure for removal of genital warts. A number of treatment options exist; however, no treatment is 100% effective in eliminating warts and preventing them from coming back in all patients. It also is not possible to eliminate infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) once it has occurred. Genital warts may go away on their own in about 10% to 20% of people over a period of three to four months.

Things you should also know:

  1. Because the warts themselves are infectious, avoid touching them. Do not pick or squeeze the warts.
  2. Take the necessary precautions to prevent trauma to the area, which can result in bleeding.
  3. Special laboratory tests can also be used to confirm the presence of HPV infection.
  4. A routine Pap smear should always be done in order to look for evidence of HPV infection and abnormal cells on the cervix.
  5. Sometimes, lesions are only visible with an enhancing technique called acetowhitening. This technique involves the application of 5% acetic acid solution to the area of suspicion for about 5-10 minutes. Infected areas will turn white.
  6. In women, genital warts have a similar appearance and usually occur in the moist areas of the labia minora and vaginal opening. Lesions visible on the outer genitals warrant a thorough examination of the vaginal canal, cervix, and anorectal area. Most vaginal warts occur without symptoms.
  7. Rarely, women may experience bleeding after sexual intercourse, itching, or vaginal discharge.
  8. Specific descriptions
  9. Warts in more than one area are common.
  10. Men and women with genital warts will often complain of painless bumps, itching, and discharge.
  11. Signs or genital warts: First know although genital warts are painless, they may be bothersome because of their location, size, or due to itching.
  12. Generally, about two-thirds of people who have sexual contact with a partner who has genital warts develop them within three months.
  13. Common warts are not the same as genital warts and are caused by different HPV types that infect the skin.

QUOTE FOR WEDNESDAY:

 
“STDs such as syphilis and HIV can have severe consequences if left untreated. Even common diseases such as gonorrhea and chlamydia can cause problems if undiagnosed for long periods of time.”
 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)