QUOTE FOR WEDNESDAY:

“Researchers have known for several years about diabetes and the higher risk of vascular dementia, the second most common kind. In ways, it seems only logical: Vascular dementia is caused by damaged blood vessels in the brain, just as diabetes hardens blood vessels elsewhere.”

Part IV Brain Diabetes (Type 3 Diabetes) = Alzheimer’s Disease

type3diabetespart-ii type3diabetesalzheimerspartii

More Tips for Avoiding Alzheimer’s Disease

The beauty of following a healthy diet is that it helps treat and prevent all chronic degenerative diseases, from the common ones like heart disease, cancer, diabetes, obesity and Alzheimer’s to the ones you have never heard of or can’t even pronounce.

The first step is to eat healthy, maintaining exercise balanced with rest and practice healthy habits in addressing Alzheimer’s disease, which is currently at epidemic proportions, with 5.4 million Americans – including one in eight people aged 65 and over – living with the disease.7 By 2050, this is expected to jump to 16 million, and in the next 20 years it is projected that Alzheimer’s will affect one in four Americans. People we need to live healthier if not to help ourselves our future young ones.

In spite of how common memory loss is among Westerners, it is NOT a “normal” part of aging. While even mild “senior moments” may be caused by the same brain lesions associated with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, these cognitive changes are by no means inevitable! People who experience very little decline in their cognitive function up until their deaths have been found (post-mortem) to be free of brain lesions, showing that it’s entirely possible to prevent the damage from occurring in the first place and one of the best ways to do this is by leading a healthy lifestyle.

  • Fructose. As mentioned, most everyone will benefit from keeping their total fructose consumed to below 25 grams per day.
  • Improve Magnesium Levels. There is some exciting preliminary research strongly suggesting a decrease in Alzheimer symptoms with increased levels of magnesium in the brain. Unfortunately most magnesium supplements do not pass the blood brain levels, but a new one, magnesium threonate, appears to and holds some promise for the future for treating this condition.
  • Optimize your vitamin D levels with safe sun exposure. Strong links between low levels of vitamin D in Alzheimer’s patients and poor outcomes on cognitive tests have been revealed.8 Researchers believe that optimal vitamin D levels may enhance the amount of important chemicals in your brain and protect brain cells by increasing the effectiveness of the glial cells in nursing damaged neurons back to health.
  • Vitamin D may also exert some of its beneficial effects on Alzheimer’s through its anti-inflammatory and immune-boosting properties. Sufficient vitamin D is imperative for proper functioning of your immune system to combat inflammation that is also associated with Alzheimer’s.
  • Vitamin B12: According to a small Finnish study recently published in the journal Neurology,9 people who consume foods rich in B12 may reduce their risk of Alzheimer’s in their later years. For each unit increase in the marker of vitamin B12 (holotranscobalamin) the risk of developing Alzheimer’s was reduced by 2 percent. Very high doses of B vitamins have also been found to treat Alzheimer’s disease and reduce memory loss.
  • Eat a nutritious diet, rich in folate. Vegetables, without question, are your best form of folate, and we should all eat plenty of fresh raw veggies every day.
  • High-quality animal-based omega-3 fats, such as krill oil. (I recommend avoiding most fish because, although fish is naturally high in omega-3, most fish are now severely contaminated with mercury.) High intake of the omega-3 fats EPA and DHA help by preventing cell damage caused by Alzheimer’s disease, thereby slowing down its progression, and lowering your risk of developing the disorder.
  • Avoid and remove mercury from your body. Dental amalgam fillings, which are 50% mercury by weight, are one of the major sources of heavy metal toxicity, however you should be healthy prior to having them removed.
  • Avoid aluminum, such as antiperspirants, non-stick cookware, vaccine adjuvants, etc.
  • Exercise regularly. It’s been suggested that exercise can trigger a change in the way the amyloid precursor protein is metabolized,10 thus, slowing down the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s. Exercise also increases levels of the protein PGC-1alpha. Research has also shown that people with Alzheimer’s have less PGC-1alpha in their brains11 and cells that contain more of the protein produce less of the toxic amyloid protein associated with Alzheimer’s. I would strongly recommend reviewing the Peak Fitness Technique for my specific recommendations.
  • Avoid flu vaccinations as most contain both mercury and aluminum, well-known neurotoxic and immunotoxic agents.
  • Eat plenty of blueberries. Wild blueberries, which have high anthocyanin and antioxidant content, are known to guard against Alzheimer’s and other neurological diseases.
  • Challenge your mind daily. Mental stimulation, especially learning something new, such as learning to play an instrument or a new language, is associated with a decreased risk of Alzheimer’s. Researchers suspect that mental challenge helps to build up your brain, making it less susceptible to the lesions associated with Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Avoid anticholinergic and statin drugs. Drugs that block acetylcholine, a nervous system neurotransmitter, have been shown to increase your risk of dementia. These drugs include certain nighttime pain relievers, antihistamines, sleep aids, certain antidepressants, medications to control incontinence, and certain narcotic pain relievers.
  • Statin drugs are particularly problematic because they suppress the synthesis of cholesterol, deplete your brain of coenzyme Q10 and neurotransmitter precursors, and prevent adequate delivery of essential fatty acids and fat-soluble antioxidants to your brain by inhibiting the production of the indispensable carrier biomolecule known as low-density lipoprotein.

 

QUOTE FOR TUESDAY:

“Unfortunately, there is no known cure for diabetes at this time. While there are ways to manage the effects of diabetes and diabetes complications, scientists have yet to find a cure.”
 
JDRF (Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation)

Part III Take control of your Diabetes-decrease the complications!

diabetes-complications  diabetes-complications2

HOW we can decrease the risk of complications and decrease the chance of diabetes worsening = KEEP IT UNDER CONTROL = PRACTICING VERY GOOD MANAGEMENT IN CARING FOR YOUR DIABETES

 

 This is how you can reach this goal:

-Controlling your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol can make a huge difference in staying healthy. Talk with your doctor about what your goals should be and how to reach them but make sure you are given information on paper or write down what it is you have discussed in the doctor’s office based on your care for diabetes and what to do. Usually diabetic information on paper is available and given to you.

To reach this know the following:

-Your healthy eating plan that you and your doctor with a dietician have discussed.

-Overweight? Than diet down to your therapeutic weight range for your height after discussed with by you with your doctor.

-Be physically active for 30 to 60 minutes most days but if this is new get your doctor to clear this activity for you with what kind of activity you are allowed and not allowed.

-Take your medicines as directed and keep taking them even after you’ve reached your goals; or you will be at high risk of ending up the way you were earlier=Diabetes badly controlled with running into the problems you had earlier.

-If you smoke=QUIT.

-Check your skin daily in particular the FEET and LOWER LEGS to check for redness, swelling to blisters, sores and sore toenails

-Ask your doctor if you should be taking aspirin to prevent a heart attack or stroke by making the blood less thick to thinner making it easier for the heart to pump and less stress to the organ.

-Need assistance like others have needed? Here it is; knowing how to survive with Diabetes 1 or 2 and that is to reach the best goal you can in treating it:

The key is to controlling your DIABETES is to be living a healthy life! This consists of diet, exercise or activity and healthy habits learned and practiced routinely in your life that will help prevent or assist in treating diabetic disease. The better we treat ourselves regarding health the higher the odds we will live a longer and healthier life. There is not just one food to eat or one type of exercise to do or one healthy habit to practice in order to keep you healthy, there’s choices. To be a part learn what healthier habits or changes you want for a healthier way of living; learn how to eat out of the 4 food groups to prevent Diabetes or eating out of the 4 food groups that are following your diabetic diet as ordered by your MD. It allows you to make all the decisions in what you want to do regarding what to eat (diet). Now with diet you must include exercise/activity, and what healthy habits you want to add in your life that are not so healthy; you know what that is and if not read a book on how to get heathier-including how to prevent diabetes where the library and book stores have many options for you. Provide yourself with the information and healthy foods in your diet, if you decide you want it. You make all the choices.

The ending line of all problems resulting from Diabetes is due to the thick high glucose blood in the blood stream filtering throughout the different organs in our body causing from peripheral neuropathy to necrotic skin to amputations for LE’s usually or same effect elsewhere causing macular degeneration to blindness or increase of cancers, heart disease, and could go on about the  effects of diabetes.  Get it now its control your blood glucose keeping it in therapeutic range  decreasing the odds of developing these conditions or the severity of these conditions.

If you don’t have diabetes than take the steps to prevent being diagnosed with it later in life.  WHAT are those steps? Eat Right (Healthy), Keep your weight in therapeutic range, Exercise the body balancing it with rest, decrease stress, and take care of yourself.  BUT if there is heredity in the family, especially your nuclear family, when you see your primary care doctor every 6 months or yearly have your glucose checked to see if it is high or not.  Simply get a BMP or CMP blood test that looks at blood electrolyte levels that includes glucose.  If its high the next step is getting the doctor to check your hemoglobin A1C another blood test done with no eating for 12 hrs prior to see what your real glucose level is prior to your first meal in the morning (done on a empty stomach).  For if you eat prior to the test it won’t accurate on your true glucose level.  2 Easy blood tests.

It is all up to you!

 Wouldn’t you want less disease/illness for yourself, for your family, others significant to you and even throughout the nation including our future generations. Wouldn’t it be great to see Diabetes decrease in America for future years and giving us an ending result of higher probability that we would overall a healthier country with less diseases. If that included Diabetes what an impact it would play in decreasing other diseases alone caused just by Diabetes (That would be cardiac disease, renal disease, blindness due to retinopathy, neuropathy, amputations, I could go on).  Besides how much it would decrease in this country to take care of patients with diabetes.  Presently one out of every 5 U.S. federal health care dollars is spent treating people with diabetes.  The average yearly health care costs for a person without diabetes is 2,560 dollars; for a person with diabetes that figure soars to $11,744.  Much of the human and financial costs can be avoided with proven diabetes prevention and management steps.

I’m not a diabetic but eating overall healthy and in my diet range (barely) but there and increasing my activity. Do yourself and maybe others a favor by making yourself and America a healthier country for less Diabetes and the diseases it can cause from cardiac to vision to renal to brain, etc…

 

REFERENCES for Part 1, Part 2 & 3 this week on diabetes:

1.)  Center for Disease (CDC) – “National Diabetes Fact Sheet”

2.)  NYS Dept. of Health –Diabetes

3.)  Diabetic Neuropathy.org “All about diabetic neuropathy and nerve damage caused by Diabetes.”

4.)  NIDDK “National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

5.)  National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (NIDC) – U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.       “Preventing Diabetes Problems: What you need to know”

 

QUOTE FOR MONDAY:

“Nearly 1.8 million New Yorkers—almost 10% of the State’s population—have diabetes, a chronic condition that exacts an enormous human and financial toll.”

nyshealthfoundation.org

Part II DIABETES and HEALTH

Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a complex chronic disease involving disorders in carbohydrate, protein, and fat metabolism and the development of macro-vascular, micro-vascular, neurological complications that don’t occur over a few nights or weeks or months.  It is a metabolic disorder in where the pancreas organ ends up causing many disruptions in proper working of our body.  The pancreas is both an endocrine and exocrine gland.  The problem with diabetes is due to the endocrine part of the pancreas not working properly.  More than 1 million islet cells are located throughout the organ.  The three types of endocrine cells that the pancreas excretes into our blood stream are alpha, beta, and delta cells.  The alpha cells secrete glucagon (stored glucose), beta secrete insulin, and delta secrete gastrin and pancreatic somatostatin.   A person with DM has minimal or no beta cells secreted from the pancreas, which shows minimal or no insulin excreted in the person’s bloodstream.  Insulin is necessary for the transport of glucose, amino acids, potassium, and phosphate across the cell membrane getting these chemical elements into the cell.  When getting these elements into the cells it is like the cell eating a meal and the glucose, being one of the ingredients in the meal, is used for energy=fuel to our body; the glucose inside the cells gets carried to all our tissues in the body to allow the glucose to be utilized into all our tissues so they can do their functions (Ex. Getting glucose into the muscle tissue allows the muscles to have the energy to do the range of motion in letting us do our daily activities of living, like as simple as type or walk).  The problem with diabetes is the glucose doesn’t have the insulin being sent into the bloodstream by the pancreas to transfer the glucose across the cell membrane to be distributed as just discussed.  Instead what results is a high glucose levels in the blood stream causing hyperglycemia.  It should be apparent that when there is a deficit of insulin, as in DM, hyperglycemia with increased fat metabolism and decreased protein synthesis occur ( Our body being exposed to this type of environment over  years causes the development of many chronic conditions that would not have occurred if DM never took place in the body, all due to high glucose levels starting with not being properly displaced in the body as it should be normally.).

People with normal metabolism upon awaking and before breakfast are able to maintain blood glucose levels in the AM ranging from 60 to 110mg/dl.  After eating food the non-diabetic’s blood glucose may rise to 120-140 mg/dl after eating (postprandial), but these then rapidly return back to normal.  The reason for this happening is you eat food, it reaches the stomach, digestion takes place during digestion the stomach brakes down fats, carbohydrates, and sugars from compound sugars to simple sugars (fructose and glucose).  Than the sugars transfer from the stomach into the bloodstream causing an increase in sugar levels.  Now, your body uses the sugar it needs at that time throughout the entire body for energy and if still extra sugar left in the bloodstream that isn’t needed at that time to be utilized it now needs to go somewhere out of the bloodstream to allow the glucose blood level to get back between 60-110mg/dl.  That extra glucose first gets stored up in the liver 60-80% and then gets stored in our fat tissue=fat storage=weight increase.  Unfortunately this doesn’t take place with a diabetic since there is very little or no insulin being released by the pancreas and over time due to the high blood glucose blood levels (called hyperglycemia) problems arise in the body over years.   When diabetes occurs there is a resolution and you have the disease the rest of your life.  You need to control your glucose level.

Risk factors for Diabetes are either unmodified OR modified=factors we can control in our lives (ex. diet, obese, habits (good or poor), and more.

2 TYPES OFDM: a.)Diabetes I  & b.) Diabetes ll. We have risk factors that can cause disease/illness; there are unmodified and modified risk factors. With unmodified risk factors we have no control in them, which are 4 and these are: Heredity, Sex, Age, Race.  Now modified risk factors are factors we can control, 3 of them that you can control is your weight, diet and health habits (which play a big role in why many people get diabetes II). 

Look at what the Mayo Clinic (www.mayoclinic.com /health/diabetes)says about risk factors:

RISK FACTOR FOR TYPE  DIABETES ONE:

Although the exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown, genetic factors can play a role. Your risk of developing type 1 diabetes increases if you have a parent or sibling who has type 1 diabetes. Based on research, we also know that genes account for less than half the risk of developing type1 disease. These findings suggest that there are other factors besides genes that influence the development of diabetes. We don’t know what these factors are, but a number of different theories exist.  Environmental factors, such as exposure to a viral illness, also likely play some role in type 1 diabetes. Other factors that may increase your risk include:

The presence of damaging immune system cells that make autoantibodies. Sometimes family members of people with type 1 diabetes are tested for the presence of diabetes autoantibodies. If you have these autoantibodies, you have an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. But, not everyone who has these autoantibodies develops type 1.

Dietary factors.

-A number of dietary factors have been linked to an increased risk of type 1 diabetes, such as low vitamin D consumption; early exposure to cow’s milk or cow’s milk formula; or exposure to cereals before 4 months of age.

-Race. Type 1 diabetes is more common in whites than in other races.

-Geography.

-Certain countries, such as Finland and Sweden, have higher rates of type 1 diabetes.

RISK FACTORS FOR DIABETES TYPE 2 AND PREDIABETES

Researchers don’t fully understand why some people develop prediabetes and type 2 diabetes and others don’t. It’s clear that certain factors increase the risk, however, including:

Weight.

The more fatty tissue you have, the more resistant your cells become to insulin.

Inactivity.

The less active you are, the greater your risk. Physical activity helps you control your weight, uses up glucose as energy and makes your cells more sensitive to insulin. Exercising less than three times a week may increase your risk of type 2 diabetes.

Family history.

Your risk increases if a parent or sibling has type 2 diabetes.

Race.

Although it’s unclear why, people of certain races — including blacks, Hispanics, American Indians and Asians — are at higher risk.

Age.

Your risk increases as you get older. This may be because you tend to exercise less, lose muscle mass and gain weight as you age. But type 2 diabetes is also increasing dramatically among children, adolescents and younger adults.

Gestational diabetes.

If you developed gestational diabetes when you were pregnant, your risk of developing prediabetes and type 2 diabetes later increases. If you gave birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds (4 kilograms), you’re also at risk of type 2 diabetes.

Polycystic ovary syndrome.

For women, having polycystic ovary syndrome — a common condition characterized by irregular menstrual periods, excess hair growth and obesity — increases the risk of diabetes.

High blood pressure.

Having blood pressure over 140/90mm Hg is linked to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

Abnormal cholesterol levels.

If you have low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or “good,” cholesterol, your risk of type 2 diabetes is higher. Low levels of HDL are defined as below 35 mg/dL.

High levelsn of triglycerides. Triglycerides are a fat carried in the blood. If your triglyceride levels are above 250 mg/dL, your risk of diabetes increases.

RISK FACTORS FOR GESTATIONAL DIABETES (DIABETES 2)

Any pregnant woman can develop gestational diabetes, but some women are at greater risk than are others. Risk factors for gestational diabetes include:

Age.

Women older than age 25 are at increased risk.

Family or personal history.

Your risk increases if you have prediabetes — a precursor to type 2 diabetes — or if a close family member, such as a parent or sibling, has type 2 diabetes. You’re also at greater risk if you had gestational diabetes during a previous pregnancy, if you delivered a very large baby or if you had an unexplained stillbirth.

Weight.

Being overweight before pregnancy increases your risk.

Race.

For reasons that aren’t clear, women who are black, Hispanic, American Indian or Asian are more likely to develop gestational diabetes.

The key not to get diabetes is taking Prevention Measures (especially regarding type II) but even diagnosed with diabetes there are measures you can take in helping to control the glucose and decreasing the chances of increasing the side effects of what it can cause to the human body organs overtime especially cardiac disease, kidney disease, neuropathy, retinopathy to blind from having hyperglycemia frequently over years; in time it thickens the blood making circulation difficulty effecting tissues furthest from the heart= feet/lower extremities where skin ulcers occur for not getting enough oxygen to the tissues in the feet or lower extremities that can lead to necrosis causing amputation of toes to foot to below knee amputation to even above knee amputation.  It also increases chance of heart attack and stroke.

PREVENTION first and CONTROL second when diagnosed with DM, is so vitally important.

So help control your diabetes through diet (eating a low glucose or sugar diet=1800 to 2000 calories a day as your m.d. prescribes for you), weight (get in therapeutic weight range), and practice healthy habits.

 

 

 

Part I What is Diabetes and more!

 

Diabetes is becoming more common in the United States. From 1980 through 2011, the number of Americans with diagnosed diabetes has more than tripled as of 2011 (from 5.6 million to 20.9 million). Do you know how much it is costing in our country?  Its a combination of factors that has caused such and increase in the disease of Diabetes in the U.S.  Factors:

-Look how much our population has increased with fast food companies pushing the  unhealthy foods the sell in restaurants or food stores.

-Also people from other countries who permanently came into America becoming a citizen from 1980 to now and came in to the U.S. already eating poor OR picked up the bad habits of eating poor foods that the U.S. media pushes that is acceptable to enough by U.S. society (that is continues) and is adding to the diabetic population whether they came in the U.S. with it or got it when coming to live in America.

-Than people born in U.S. with family having a history of diabetes or worse parents who did not watch good eating habits when raising their children who got obese putting them at high risk for diabetes.

-Ending line, these factors massively increased making the number of Diabetic Americans 3x higher since 1980.

-Than another factor is the illegals with diabetes also adds to the number of diabetic people in America; for they are not left out and are treated in hospitals with citizens.  If the come to an ER in the U.S. we treat them.

These factors all IMPACT an increase in the number of Diabetics in America!

Wake up America!  We need to get this disease under better control!  See how Diabetes keeps increasing in the U.S.?

That’s right. The metabolic condition is about as American as you can get, according to a national report card on diabetes by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2011.

The report shows that nearly half of Americans have diabetes or prediabetes, which puts them at high risk for the condition. A good number of these folks haven’t been diagnosed and don’t even realize their predicament.

People with diabetes have too much sugar in their blood. If the disease isn’t controlled, they can wind up with heart disease, nerve damage, kidney problems, eye damage and other serious health problems.

The new report combines data from the CDC, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Indian Health Service and the Census Bureau. Here’s a numerical look at what they reveal about diabetes in America.

30.3 million – The number of people in the U.S. who had diabetes in 2015.

That’s right. The metabolic condition is about as American as you can get, according to a new national report card on diabetes released Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

There are 2 types of Diabetes:

Type 1 diabetes was previously called insulin-dependent mellitus (IDDM) or juvenile-onset diabetes. This type of diabetes happens when the immune system ends up destroying beta cells in the body that come from our pancreas and they are the only cells in the human body that make the hormone INSULIN the regulates your glucose. Insulin allows glucose to transfer into the cells and tissues of our body to give them their energy to do their job in the body and nutrition to work properly=sugar-glucose. To live with this diabetes the person must have their insulin delivered by injection or a pump. This form of diabetes usually occurs in children or young adults but can occur at any age.

Type 2 diabetes was called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult-onset diabetes. In adults, type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90-95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. It usually begins as insulin resistance, a disease in which the cells do not use insulin properly due to the pancreas not making enough or the pancreas not secreting the correct form o of insulin to do its function. Ending line the insulin isn’t working properly. As the need for insulin rises, the pancreas gradually loses its ability to produce it.

Type 2 diabetes is associated with older age, OBESITY, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes, impaired glucose metabolism, physical inactivity and race/ethnicity.

Gestational diabetes is a form of glucose intolerance diagnosed during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes occurs more frequently among African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, and American Indians. It is also more common among obese women and women with a family history of diabetes. During pregnancy, gestational diabetes requires treatment to optimize maternal blood glucose levels to lessen the risk of complications in the infant.

Other types of diabetes result from; specific genetic conditions (such as maturity-onset diabetes of youth), surgery, medications, infections, pancreatic disease, and other illnesses. Such types of diabetes account for 1% to 5% of all diagnosed cases.

Treating diabetes

Diet, insulin, and oral medication to lower blood glucose levels are the foundation of diabetes treatment and management. Patient education and self-care practices are also important aspects of disease management that help people with diabetes lead normal lives.

To survive, people with type 1 diabetes must have insulin delivered by injection or a pump.

Many people with type 2 diabetes can control their blood glucose by following a healthy meal plan and exercise program, losing excess weight, and taking oral medication. Medications for each individual with diabetes will often change during the course of the disease. Some people with type 2 diabetes may also need insulin to control their blood glucose.

Self-management education or training is a key step in improving health outcomes and quality of life. It focuses on self-care behaviors, such as healthy eating, being active, and monitoring blood sugar.

Criteria for the diagnosis of diabetes:

A fasting blood sugar level ≥126 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) after an overnight fast, which is just taking the finger stick right when you wake up before breakfast OR

A 2-hour blood sugar level ≥200 mg/dL after a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), OR

An A1c level ≥6.5%. (The A1C test is a simple lab test that measures average blood glucose levels over the past 3 months. A small blood sample to check your A1C can be taken at any time of the day=simply a blood test)

Pretty simple isn’t it but you have to  the move!  Take action and make changes if you need to!

Diabetes is not only common and serious; it is also VERY COSTLY! Let us take a look:

The cost of treating diabetes is staggering. According to the American Diabetes Association, the annual cost of diabetes in medical expenses and lost productivity rose for $98 billion in 1997 to $132 billion in $2002 to $174 billion in 2007.

One out of every 5 U.S. federal health care dollars is spent treating people with diabetes. The average yearly health care costs for a person without diabetes is 2,560 dollars; for a person with diabetes that figure soars to $11,744. Much of the human and financial costs can be avoided with proven diabetes prevention and management steps.

 

QUOTE FOR FRIDAY:

“After a cancer diagnosis, staging provides important information about the extent of cancer in the body and anticipated response to treatment.”
 
American Cancer Society

Part III Stomach Cancer – The treatments!

Treatment to Stomach Cancer:

Many treatments can fight stomach cancer. The one you and your doctor choose will depend on how long you’ve had the disease or how much it has spread in your body, called the stage of your cancer.

Surgery. Your doctor might remove part of your stomach or other tissues nearby that have cancer cells. Surgery gets rid of the tumor and stops cancer from spreading to other parts of your body. If your disease is in a more advanced stage, your doctor might need to remove all of your stomach=Gastrectomy or in some other cases the Surgeon may only have to remove part of the stomach=Partial Gastrectomy.

Some tumors can keep food from moving in and out of your stomach. In that case, you might have surgery to put in a stent, a device that keeps the pathways open.

Chemotherapy. Drugs kill your cancer cells or keep them from growing. You can take them as pills or through an IV at a clinic. Chemo usually takes several weeks. The drugs can cause side effects, but your doctor can help you find ways to feel better during treatment.

Radiation. High-energy waves or particles can kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Your doctor may use an X-ray or other machine to beam radiation at the spot where your tumor is.

Chemoradiation. Your doctor might use this mix of chemotherapy and radiation to shrink your tumor before surgery.

Targeted drugs. These newer drugs are different because they fight only cancer cells. Other treatments, like chemo and radiation, can kill healthy cells along with diseased ones. As a result, targeted therapies have fewer side effects than these other treatments.

How Can I Prevent Stomach Cancer?

Treat stomach infections. If you have ulcers from an H. pylori infection, get treatment. Antibiotics can kill the bacteria, and other drugs will heal the sores in the lining of your stomach to cut your risk of cancer.

Eat healthy. Get more fresh fruits and vegetables on your plate every day. They’re high in fiber and in some vitamins that can lower your cancer risk. Avoid very salty, pickled, cured, or smoked foods like hot dogs, processed lunch meats, or smoked cheeses. Keep your weight at a healthy level, too. Being overweight or obese can also raise your risk of the disease.