Archive | November 2014

QUOTE FOR FRIDAY:

Some of the risk factors for stroke cannot be controlled, such as your age or family history. But you can take steps to lower your risk by changing the factors you can control.

CDC-Center for Disease Control and Prevention

*Prevention of Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)*

There are 2 types of strokes:

1-Hemmoragic-a blood vessel that bursts in the brain causing lack of oxygen to be supplied to the area of the brain (a lobe) where the vessel ruptured.  Lack of oxygen to any area of the body tissue=starvation to the tissue; where in this case is the brain=a stroke.

2-Blockages-These blockages caused by the following: blood clots, athero-sclerosis, a common disorder, it happens due to fat, cholesterol, with even tar from smoking, or other substances that build up in the walls of the arteries forming hard structures called plaque and in time creating a blockage in the vessel interfering with blood supply providing oxygen to tissue and if blocked in the brain=high probability of a stroke occurring if not taken care of.   “Recommended related to Heart Disease” by Web MD which states that atherosclerosis is the key cause of heart attacks & strokes including it’s the number one killer in the United States.  Risk Factors for atherosclerosis include high blood pressure (b/p)=arteriosclerosis, blood level of high bad cholesterol (LDL), blood level of low good cholesterol (HDL), smoking, diabetes, and history of heart attacks in your nuclear family.  Definitely a healthy diet, having exercise in your life, and your weight within the therapeutic body mass index level will help prevent, if not treat, atherosclerosis.

                                                                                                                                                                              The Risk Factors of this disease, especially diet & sedentary lifestyle:

  1. High Blood Pressure (b/p)-This is also known as the diagnosis hypertension.  In understanding how hypertension works let’s use a metaphor:  Think of a blood vessel as a long thin balloon and if we stand on it the pressure will increase inside the balloon causing the diameter of the balloon to swell up.  If you continue to step on the balloon adding additional pressure this causes it to finally reach it’s total amount of pressure or when you exceed the total level of pressure this results in popping the balloon.  Similar concept with high b/p, that’s if the pressure keeps rising in our blood vessels due to blockage or vasoconstriction (which is making the vessels diameter more narrow=increased pressure in the vessels) sooner or later a vessel bursts somewhere in the body due to the b/p passing it’s total level in the amount of pressure that it can handle in the circulatory system which can result into a burst of an artery, like in the brain causing a stroke or in a vessel near the heart causing a myocardial infarction (but this is another topic some other day).  Think of food,  a human being not eating leads into starvation, well for blood cells lack of oxygen=starvation to the cells.  This causes in both situations or cases a lack of nutrition (the tissue is lacking oxygen).  With a stroke, not enough oxygen is getting to the brain resulting from either a hemorrhage (loosing too much blood=loosing to many cells=oxygen (food for tissue) or a blockage preventing 02 getting to the area.  Though many people have increased b/p due to only 2 things diet leading them to obesity, and lack of exercise due to a sedentary lifestyle, which could be changed and resolve the problem in most cases.  Increased b/p can also be due noncompliance- like continuing to smoke, or not following the healthy regimen the M.D. ordered for you as a patient.  The overall healthy regimen for a person with hypertension would be a low sodium diet (preventing further vasoconstriction), even low in cholesterol/fat/1800-2000 calories a day (preventing obesity or further weight gain), balancing rest with exercise and the b/p medications taken as prescribed, by their M.D.    So for many Americans hypertension can be controlled just by diet with balancing exercise with rest.  For others it might take a little more like doing which is what I just mentioned with following your medication regimen as ordered and going to your doctor having your b/p monitored, as your M.D. prescribes. ________________________________________________________________                                                                                                                                                                            2. 2. Smoking-For starters, this unhealthy habit puts you at risk for high blood pressure since it causes vasoconstriction (narrowing) of the vessels in our body due to the nicotine.  The answer to this risk factor is simply quit this unhealthy habit.  Smoking adds to the plaque building up in the vessels.  Centers for Disease state that in 2010 the leading cause of death was heart disease followed by cancer than to chronic respiratory disease and lastly stroke.  Over time a healthy diet balanced with exercise daily or every 2 days for 30minutes would help decrease the cardiac disease and stroke.  The American Lung Association states that smoking is directly responsible for approximately 90 percent of lung cancer deaths and approximately 80-90 percent of COPD (emphysema and chronic bronchitis) deaths.
  • Among adults who have ever smoked, 70% started smoking regularly at age 18 or younger, and 86% at age 21 or younger.3
  • Smoking harms nearly every organ in the body, and is a main cause of lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, including chronic bronchitis and emphysema). It is also a cause of coronary heart disease (CAD), stroke and a host of other cancers and diseases.________________________________________________________________Cholesterol is also found in some foods, such as seafood, eggs, meats and dairy products.LDL can cause plaque build-up. Plaque is a thick, hard substance that can clog arteries. Recent studies show that high levels of LDL and triglycerides (blood fats) raise the risk of ischemic stroke. Plaque can also increase risk of a transient ischemic attack (TIA) where stroke symptoms go away within 24 hours.  Stroke verses TIA=Nonreversible verses Reversible. Stroke is scarring to the brain where TIA doesn’t.  Like Heart Attack verses Angina, Heart Attack is scarring to the heart verses no scarring to the heart with Angina. Both Angina and TIA are just lack of oxygen to the heart and the brain, causing the symptoms due to lack of oxygen=ischemia.  Both heart attack and stroke are both a lot worse than just ischemia.  They both get to the point where there in no oxygen causing actual permanent damage to the organ since the problem never reversed=scarring to the heart and brain.High cholesterol levels or plaque build-up in the arteries can block normal blood flow to the brain and cause a stroke. High cholesterol may also increase the risk of heart disease and atherosclerosis, which are both risk factors for stroke.Many things can affect the b/p levels & cholesterol levels. Some can be changed and some cannot.   We can change 3 things.  You can change, anyone can change, it’s up to you in deciding whether to do it or not and being able to discipline yourself with having the power to do it. They are:2-Weight — Being overweight can increase your cholesterol levels.                                                                                                                                                         These 3 things can prone you to high blood pressure (B/P), a stroke, & cardiac disease and even other diseases.  I just had a dear friend who I’ve known almost 35 years that survived coronary artery bypass surgery over 55 y/o, with 5 blockages (2 100% blocked and 3 at least 80% blocked).  That was a set up for a silent heart attack if he didn’t have the surgery but he was lucky in getting symptoms of chest pain and fatigue/lethargy due to these blockages.  This made him go the doctor.  He stopped smoking the day before the surgery.   His life had taken a 360 turn and stopped in his daily routine and life schedule.  It had begun all over again at almost 60.   Without controlling your blood pressure therapeutically or ending your smoking or eating healthy with living healthy habits the heart at first will be able to compensate with living unhealthy habits but over time the heart may find it so hard to function or work that the heart starts to fail in doing its job effectively (it decompensates causing failure if no changes are made).  Again let’s take the car, you do maintenance to the vehicle it will operate and last longer, well the exact principle with the human body.  Pretty simple isn’t it.
  • If you don’t eat a healthy diet, keep your weight in a therapeutic range, properly exercise than expect a high odds they will be leaning more towards a shortening of your life span.  You can control your diet, weight and your exercise the right way with a little direction.  We are here for just direction in helping you maintain a good diet including weight and giving you guidance through Dr. Anderson’s book called Dr. A’s healthy habits in giving you knowledge about routine exercise, all 4 food groups and how to eat them in healthy proportions.  It explains how the metabolism works with 3 meals as opposed to 6 meals with how the body works regarding the foods you eat.  It tells you so much more.   It allows you to know the information for changes that you may need to take to lessen risks of certain diseases occurring in your life through modification with diet and healthy habits.  This allows you to make the choice on your life where you can make it more enjoyable and less restricted now and at retirement by sticking to a good health diet and healthy habits, not for 3 or 6 months but for life.  You make all the decisions in what you want to do with your body with what’s acceptable.  Join me in living a healthier life with starting a spread throughout America for a healthier country.  Go to healthyusa.tsfl.com. and take a peek it doesn’t cost a dime.
  • 3-Exercise — People who are not active tend to have higher cholesterol levels.   
  • 1-Diet — Foods high in saturated fat and cholesterol can increase cholesterol levels. 
  • ________________________________________________________________
  • The second main type of cholesterol is high-density lipoprotein (HDL), often called the “good” cholesterol. High levels of HDL may reduce stroke risk.
  • Because cholesterol does not dissolve in the blood on its own, it must be carried to and from cells by particles called lipoproteins. There are two main types of lipoproteins: low-density lipoproteins (LDL)=the bad cholesterol and high-density lipoproteins=the good cholesterol (HDL).
  • 3. High Cholesterol-The National Stroke Association states the following about cholesterol: Cholesterol is a soft, waxy fat (lipid) that is made by the body. It is found in the bloodstream and in all of your body’s cells. The body needs cholesterol to form cell membranes, some hormones and vitamin D.
  • So let’s take a car for instance, if the transmission is bad and not repaired by a mechanic the engine will be effected and soon fail completely.  Now let’s take the lungs, if they are bad and you don’t go to a doctor to help treat the problem the heart will be effected at some point to failure in function and vice versa.  If a smoker doesn’t quit it causes COPD=Emphysema (this does take over years) and it will affect the heart in time to not function as effectively with someone who has healthy lungs.  Worse, if you don’t quit smoking you increase the risk of getting CAD (coronary artery disease) and add to the problem atherosclerosis if you already have the diagnosis which is caused by fatty materials (lipids), fibrous tissue with tar (from the smoking) causing blockages in the vessels.  You also have a risk at lung cancer.

QUOTE FOR WEDNESDAY:

“I saw many people who had advanced heart disease and I was so frustrated because I knew if they just knew how to do the right thing, simple lifestyle and diet steps, that the entire trajectory of their life and health would have been different.”

Dr. Mehmet Oz (cardiothoracic surgeon & The host of The Dr. Oz Show)

Part 2 The Heart is the Engine of the body!

Now knowing the anatomy and physiology of the heart let’s now understand more about cardiac disease in how they develop and in how it effects the engine of the body, being the heart and other areas of the body. If eating unhealthy or living unhealthy habits or even overweight to obese these are the problems that can arise regarding the cardiac system alone:

  • High Blood Pressure is the primary cause of death among Americans older than 25. About 75 million people suffer from high B/P or hypertension, which is a major risk factor for heart disease and more. Did you know that from the National Health Survey in 1981 their statistics indicated that hypertension afflicts at least 17 to 22 million American adults during that time, in the book of “Principles of Anatomy and Physiology” by authors Tortora and Anagnostakos? Look at today, yes our population has increased but the debate with that is we now know better and have for awhile. We as responsible people for ourselves, families (children in particular) and as a country should be living healthier but still too many EAT and PRACTICE unhealthy habits based on statistics, if we weren’t disease would be less in percentage throughout America.

 

AMERICA wake up or else we will just continue increasing high in the following problems we already have at home and make life, especially for many, unbearable.                                                                                                                                              Uncontrolled high blood pressure is of considerable concern because of what harm it can do to the HEART, BRAIN, and KIDNEYS if it remains uncontrolled:                                                                                       1- Heart=Angina to Heart Attack (infarction) 2- Brain=Transient Ischemia Attack (TIA) to a stroke  3- Kidneys=Reducing blood suppy to kidneys causing the kidneys to secrete RENIN into the blood. This enzyme breaks down angiotensin from the plasma protein (a powerful blood constrictor in the blood ) making the blood pressure higher.   It stimulates aldosterone release in our blood stream that promotes sodium and water retention in the blood ,= increases your B/P more due to how it works.

                                                                                                                                                                           These 3 organs with conditions are all due to obstruction of blood flow to the organs and due to the effect of Hypertension (HTN). High blood pressure climbs, and the heart must work or pump harder=things that happen to our engine:   One, the heart muscle tissue eventually thickens and the heart becomes ENLARGED causing it not to do its job properly causing it to go in time into failure.   Two, is stress to the heart = lack of oxygen = chest pain or myocardial infarction (heart attack). When we stress the heart out=overworked, lack of oxygen to the heart tissue happens = pain as a symptom (we call it Angina that can be reversed) and if it continues it can lead to a heart attack = scarring to the heart = damage done to the heart that’s not reversible. Also with constant HTN which can cause constriction of vessels in the brain this can cause the same stress but with different symptoms, the brain with uncontrolled HTN can cause lack of oxygen to the brain = headache which if not resolved can lead to a TIA (reversible) or stroke (scarring to the brain, not reversible).   All of these responses are made worse by low potassium intake and high sodium intake orally (in a lot of cases these conditions could have been controlled via diet, exercise with balancing it with rest and check up with a doctor (cardiac especially).

2 – Arteriosclerosis or Atherosclerosis both = CAD (Coronary Artery Disease)                  

This is a common disorder, typically affecting men over age 50 and women as well but possibly earlier. People are at higher risk if they have a personal or family history of coronary artery disease (heart disease) or cerebrovascular disease (stroke), diabetes, smoking, hypertension (high blood pressure), or kidney disease involving hemodialysis.   Than live healthy if you want to live longer and not get these risks or even if you do have them already than be compliant in reaching your optimal level of health with the disease. If no history and not diagnosed yet with any of these but want to prevent it live healthy, if you’re not. Arteriosclerosis is hardening of the arteries, which occurs with aging (wear and tear from also practicing bad habits that takes over years allowing this to form not just due to age; that’s why most books state it happens later in life. As opposed to adults not too many with cardiac disease young). Atherosclerosis is a form of arteriosclerosis but this is the lipid related arterial lesion, is the major disease responsible for the principle clinical complications = BLOCKAGE in the arteries. Definitely affected if already with high cholesterol and fats in the diet and of course smoking from tar build up in the vessel. Over time CAD can weaken the heart muscle also causing the heart to go into decompensation causing symptoms of chest pain=angina to even a heart attack. This may lead to heart failure, a serious condition where the heart can’t pump blood the way that it should. Even an irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia, can also develop that if it gets worse could lead into cardiac arrest. The CDC states under CHF (congestive heart failure) “Diseases that damage your heart—including coronary heart disease, high blood pressure, and diabetes—are common causes of heart failure. Smoking; being overweight; eating foods high in fat, cholesterol, and sodium; and physical inactivity also increase your risk of developing heart failure.” Let’s wake up America with health and practicing good habits to decrease your risk of developing these diseases.

High Cholesterol levels — High cholesterol is one of the leading causes of heart attacks. Cholesterol is transported through your blood in two ways: the low density lipoprotein (LDL), which transports cholesterol to the cells that need it, and the high density lipoprotein (HDL), which is the healthy cholesterol that reduces your risk for heart attack. Having high LDL levels raises your risk of having heart disease by 20%. Losing 11-20 pounds can help you significantly reduce your cholesterol level so you prevent blockage from occurring preventing heart attack and atherosclerosis.  

A sedentary lifestyle and lifetime lack of exercise seems to be major contributing factors for getting arteriosclerosis and heart-disease onset; see how they all interrelate with one causing another people.

Starting to get it? That based on how healthy you live in many cases is the determining factor of how you turn out regarding disease, but there are non-modifiable risk factors to disease (not controllable) = 1.) Age 2.) Sex (Ex. A higher amount of cases with HTN are males vs. females).        3. Race (Ex. African American have a higher count in HTN than Caucasian)  4. Heredity.

Modifiable Risk Factors (things you can change that effect diseases) =            1- weight 2- smoking  3 – living conditions 4 – diet  5 – The health & unhealthy habits you practice.

How to prevent these cardiac conditions all listed above, don’t live the type of life that’s unhealthy, at least on a regular basis (if at all occasionally live unhealthy – Ex. eating fast foods) to decrease the chances of developing these cardiac conditions that are high in America now and have been for several years. Need help and guidance in how to go about this; then you are on the right website. The answer to prevention or treatment of cardiac disease is in changing or modifying your diet, if it’s unhealthy 100% or just partially. The answer includes exercise (from just walking fast or if you like working out, even better) and if needed medication your doctor will decide that, particularly cardiac – the specialist for this area. All these changes can modify your blood lipid profile = cholesterol control, which helps increasing your heart to a better tolerance with activity, stress and simply functioning. Recommended is going to a cardiologist for people diagnosed with heart conditions or your general practitioner with any illness/disease before making changes to help guide you towards the right choices. Your doctor can help you in determining which prevention or treatment plan is best for you.

Bad Foods high in cholesterol too avoid = Fast foods, whole fat dairy products = milk/cheese/ butter/mayonnaise/bacon/processed deli meats/salad dressings/shortening.

The key is to living a healthy life overall. This consists of diet, exercise or activity and healthy habits learned and practiced routinely in your life that will help prevent or assist you in treating cardiac disease. The better we treat ourselves regarding health the higher the odds we will live a longer life. It is pretty simple. There is not just one food to eat or one type of exercise to do or one healthy habit to keep you healthy, there are choices. Come onto my website which is no fee, no charge, no hacking, just letting you check us out to look further in understanding how to take a shape for your life with Dr. Anderson and even myself as your personal health coach in helping you learn what healthier habits or changes you want for a healthier way of living. It allows you to make all the decisions in what you want to do regarding what to eat (diet) using the 4 food groups, what to do as exercise/activity, and what healthy habits you want to add in your life, that you may not be doing at this time. We just provide the information and healthy foods in your diet, and you decide if you want it. You make all the choices. Wouldn’t you want less disease/illness for yourself and for others throughout the nation including the future generations? Thank you for taking the time to read my article to how we can help you get healthier and make a healthier USA. Click onto healthyusa.tsfl.com and I hope to hear from you soon.

America lets wake up & get healthier by being a therapeutic weight for our height, eating healthy in our diet, doing some form of exercise/activity daily and practicing healthy habits routinely to decrease disease with treating ourselves to things that aren’t the most healthy OCCASIONALLY to become better for now for ourselves and future generations that would help our health care economy as a whole.  Learn about the heart (our engine of the body) and how cardiac diseases can be prevented or even decreased in degree.

 

 

 

 

QUOTE FOR TUESDAY:

Obesity statistics

  • Almost 13 million (16.9%) of U.S. children ages 2 to 19 are obese.
  • Nearly one in three (31.8%) U.S. children (23.9 million) ages 2 to 19 are overweight or obese.
  • More than one-third (about 35%) of U.S. adults are obese (more than 78 million adults).American Heart Association

The HEART is the ENGINE of the body! Part 1

Let us first understand how the heart functions. For starters think of a car, without the engine the car won’t move unless pushed in neutral but the engine is still not working at all. Well, the body can’t work at all if the heart isn’t working=dead. Right? We can’t live without the heart but more importantly you can’t function actively and productively with a one that is diseased not cared for or just severely diseased. We need to take good care of our bodies especially if diseased already, that includes your heart.

Looking at the anatomy and physiology of the heart it will help us understand in how it functions. For starters the heart is like an engine in having chambers (2 on the top called atriums and 2 on the bottom called ventricles), 4 chambers to be exact (sort of like a 4 cylinder car). It also has valves, in allowing our blood to go in and out of the heart. They are located before the entrance of the blood entering the heart on the left and right upper chamber, between the upper and lower chambers (atriums & ventricles), at the beginning of arteries and veins involved in moving blood throughout the heart and to or from the lungs to exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood, in allowing the blood to leave the heart with oxygenated blood to now go throughout the body (like oil/gas entering and leaving the engine which allows it to work).

Now getting down in how the heart works. First take our blood, in particular our red blood cells are the cells that carry oxygen and carbon dioxide throughout our body; the body without enough oxygen in the body tissues=cellular starvation. We can’t survive without oxygen sent to our tissues=food to our tissues (Ex. poor circulation to any tissue of the body = pain and if not resolved it will go into necrosis = death of the tissue, like in a diabetic that has poor circulation to the toes/foot that has pain/numbness and unresolved = necrosis to amputation). So your blood, in particular the red blood cells, need to transport oxygen (O2) to and take carbon dioxide (CO2) from our tissues in the body and refill up with more 02 and release C02 (O2 used up by our tissues) that takes place at the lungs. This process is done constantly in the body to feed our tissues O2 (by RBC’s picking up 02 upon inhalation), with tissues releasing CO2 picked up by the RBC’s that take the CO2 to the lungs in release it from our body completely via breathing=exhaling but only done due to the heart beating allowing the blood to circulate and recirculate throughout the body and get more 02 from our lungs (just like the engine how the engine works to allow fuels, oils to circulate throughout the engine and other areas of the car to allow the car overall to function).                                                                                                                                                                        In review, our bodies oxygen is the food to our tissues in keeping them alive through our red blood cells (RBC’s) that carry the O2 to the tissues but there through a working heart and lungs only (one organ cannot live without the other). There has to be a systemic way we allow this to work and this is through the heart, lungs, and RBC’s (3 systems that connect with each other). The heart = right side deals with more C02 blood which is blood returning to the heart to get more 02 going first via the Rt. side of the heart to the Rt. and Lt. pulmonary artery, each of which carries blood to the lungs for 02 and C02 exchange to occur. This is for getting more 02 in our RBC’s with allowing them to release C02 at the lungs and then return them to the left side of the heart to be sent through both Lt. chambers of the heart to our blood stream to utilize the new 02 in our RBC’s to our body tissues. This is a 24hr/7days a week job for our red blood cells, lungs and heart in functioning to keep the human body alive.

In simpler terms this is how it works: The blood that needs to be refreshed with more 02 when it enters the right (Rt.) atrium coming from a vessel that brings back mainly carbon dioxide in the blood from the toes and the brain that was mainly used up by the tissues and those RBC’s need to be reoxygenated with higher levels of oxygen for the RBC’s to deliver 02 again to tissues. It first goes to the Rt. atrium & fills up to its max level simultaneously while the left (Lt.) atrium is filling up to its max level. When the Rt. atrium is ready to drop its blood max level into the Rt. ventricle below it the valves open between the chambers simultaneously dropping the blood to the Rt. Ventricle (Lt side does the same thing) but only the Rt. side ends up going to the lungs through a Rt. and Lt. pulmonary artery to get more oxygen to send it to the highly oxygenated side of the heart, being on the left side. The job the Rt. side of the heart does is this, it just goes from the Rt. side of the heart to our lungs and back to the heart on the Lt. side through the 4 pulmonary veins to the L atrium; so the path or distance for the Rt. side of the heart to do its function is a short distance = it gets your used up oxygen in the red blood cells (that are high in carbon dioxide) to get more oxygen by going through the Rt. side of the heart sending them to the lungs where they get more O2 and then they are sent back to the Lt. side of the heart.   This is the Rt. side of the heart’s function.

Now let us look at what the Lt. side of the heart does in function. The RBC’s reoxygenated leave the lungs and sent via the 4 pulmonary veins to the Lt. side of the heart reaching the Lt. atrium thus carries a high 02 level in the RBC’s (this blood just came directly from the lungs where O2 and CO2 exchange for the RBC’s took place). Next the RBC’s go to the Lt. ventricle to our Aorta that sends this high oxygen level of RBC’s out to all our tissues as food to prevent starvation of the tissues).   Again, when the valves open between the chambers and allowing this blood to fill up in the lower chambers called the Rt. and Lt. ventricles it is simultaneously done also including the valves that open and close in the the pulmonary artery and the aorta that is in the Lt. ventricle sending RBC’s out to our circulatory system high in O2 to be utilized by our body tissues.

So the way it works with both sides of the heart is the Rt. side sends blood of highly carbon dioxide blood (RBC’s) to the lungs to get re-oxygenated through 2 vessels from the Rt. side of the heart to the lungs that sends this re-oxygenated RBC’s through 4 vessels to the Lt. side of the heart and it reaches the Lt. side of the heart which sends this highly oxygenated blood throughout the top and bottom of the Lt. side of the heart to the aorta that sends this blood throughout our body tissues. When this oxygen is used all up from dispensing it out to tissues the C02 is taken back from the tissues by RBC’s that replace it with O2, this process starts all over again with these RBC’s that returned to the heart. Ending line the right side of the heart is for higher levels of carbon dioxide in the blood (used up blood) to get more oxygenated whereas the left side of the heart sends higher levels of O2 throughout the body all the way to the toes (a harder job=muscle mass of the left side of the heart works out more than the right making the left side of the heart a bigger muscle vs the right side.

Now knowing the anatomy and physiology of the heart let’s now understand more about cardiac disease in how they develop and in how it effects the engine of the body, being the heart and other areas of the body. Part 2 will be covering if eating unhealthy or living unhealthy habits or even overweight to obese these are the problems that can arise regarding the cardiac system alone: Come back tomorrow to learn more about problems that can arise from overweight to obese.

Wondering whether or not to have turkey on Thanksgiving?

Well check out about White Meat vs. Red Meat

White Meat

White meat is best known as meat that is lean, especially in comparison with red meat. The big point about white meat is that its fat content is less in comparison with red meat. Meats traditionally thought of as white (such as veal and even lamb) have been reclassified as red meats. Another advantage to eating white meat over red meat, which is also why health experts recommend it over red meat, is the lower number of calories that it contains. However, the difference in calories between white meat and red meat is not so great that it will absolutely ruin your waistline if you choose to eat some red meat once in a while.

Red Meat

Red meat is the victim of stereotypes that have been exaggerated to the point where it is today somewhat stigmatized as a food that is linked to cancer and higher fat and caloric content. While the cancer issue depends on what studies you look at and the higher caloric content is not that much over white meat, red meat does have benefits that white meat simply lacks. For example, the nutrients zinc, iron, thiamine and riboflavin (in addition to vitamins B12 and B6) appear in much greater abundance in red meat. Moreover, red meat is a great source of muscle-building protein as well as being the best source of the antioxidant called alpha lipoic acid. Still, red meat has been the subject of a lot of studies that connect it to health problems beyond cancer, like cardiovascular disease and even arthritis and hypertension.

 

Which One to Choose

The bottom line is that no matter which meat you eat, you can guard yourself against health problems if you eat in moderation. While white meat is not tied to as many health problems as red meat is, it does not feature many of the benefits that you get in red meat, such as the vitamins and minerals. So if you want to get a dose of said nutrients, you should eat more red meat, but do so in a way that is only moderate

HERE IS SOME FACTS ABOUT TURKEY

Because most cuts of turkey provide valuable amounts of protein, turkey is often regarded as a high-protein food. Skinned turkey breast will provide the most protein per serving, at 34 grams in 4 ounces. But you will still get 31 grams from 4 ounces of turkey leg and 21 grams from 4 ounces of turkey thigh.

In addition to protein, however, turkey is also rich in other nutrients. All B vitamins are present in turkey meat, including B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B12, folate, biotin, and choline. (Because the biotin content of turkey meat is sensitive to the turkey’s dietary intake, the amount of this vitamin can vary greatly, with an approximate average of 0.8 micrograms in 4 ounces of turkey breast.) Turkey is a very good source for vitamin B3 and provides about 8.5 milligram in 4 ounces, or over 40% of the Daily Value (DV). It’s also a very good source of vitamin B6, at 0.64 milligrams in 4 ounces (32% DV). By providing 22%DV for choline in 4 ounces, turkey also ranks as a good source of this B vitamin.

In terms of minerals, turkey is richest in selenium and provides over 50% of the DV in a single 4-ounce serving. Zinc, copper, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, and iron are also provided by this food in amounts varying from 5-15% DV.

All cuts of turkey contain omega-3 fats. However, the content of omega-3s in turkey can vary widely, depending on the turkey’s diet. One of the reasons we recommend pasture-raised turkey is the ability of turkeys to enjoy omega-3 containing plants and insects in natural pasture settings. As a general rule, the most favorable ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fats is found in skinned turkey breast, where the ratio in non-pasture-raised turkey is approximately 10:1. This same ratio is about 13:1 in non-pasture-raised turkey leg or turkey thigh with skin. While there are only a few studies documenting the omega-6 to omega-3 ratio in pasture-raised turkey, those studies suggest that pasture feeding can lower the ratio to approximately 7:1. (There are some studies on pasture-raised chickens that show similar results.) Within the omega-3 family of fats, it is possible to get 10-60 milligrams of DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) from a 4-ounce serving of turkey, depending on the cut and diet consumed by the turkey. DHA is a unique omega-3 fat in terms of its ability to support healthy nerve function.

Protein Richness

When we rank all of our 100+ WHFoods based on their protein richness (how much protein they provide in comparison with their calorie content), turkey ranks first among all of our foods. A 4-ounce serving of skinned baked turkey breast provides about 34 grams of protein and over two-thirds of the Daily Value (DV). With 4 ounces of turkey leg, this number drops just slightly to 31-32 grams of protein. With 4 ounces of turkey thigh, it drops to about 21 grams. In these examples, the protein values are changing from cut-to-cut partly because of the way the turkey moves and uses its muscles, and partly because of the fat content of the various cuts. If the health benefit you are seeking from turkey is focused on protein richness, you’ll probably want to stick with skinned turkey breast as your preferred cut.

 

Other Health Benefits

Unfortunately, there is not as much research on turkey as there is on chicken, its fellow bird in the poultry category. Several preliminary studies show the protein richness of turkey to be of potential benefit in regulating blood sugar levels as well as insulin metabolism. These findings make sense since adequate protein intake in a balanced way throughout the day can be very helpful in managing blood sugar. In the area of cancer prevention, turkey shows that intake of it is not associated with increased cancer risk in the same way as red meats. However,they simply show that turkey intake does not raise this risk which is still a plus compared to some other foods.

Description

Like chicken, turkey belongs to the bird (Aves) class of animals, and to the family of birds called Phasianidae. While there are many different breeds of turkeys, most of them belong to the same genus and species of bird, namely Meleagris gallopavo. Turkeys are truly native to North and South America – they were not brought to the “New World” by European settlers but were instead discovered to be already present and intimately involved with Native American cultures. Turkeys are relatively large birds that can reach about 30-35 pounds in weight. They can fly short distances at speeds of about 50-55 miles per hour and run at approximately 20-25 miles per hour.

 

History

At 2.5 million tons of turkey meat per year, the U.S. is by far the world’s largest producer of turkey. (All countries in the European Union combined produce 1.75 million tons.) Smaller amounts of turkey are produced in Africa, Asia, and the Mediterranean. At about 450,000 tons, Brazil is the largest turkey producer in South America.

In the U.S., we consume an average of 16.5 pounds of turkey per person per year. That about is about one-quarter of our chicken consumption.

According to the National Turkey Federation, about 20% of all turkey (just over three pounds per person) is consumed on Thanksgiving Day, Gobble Gobble Day.

How to Select and Store

It’s worth taking special care in the selection of turkey! Several aspects of turkey selection will help you maximize your health benefits from this World’s Healthiest Food. First, we recommend the purchase of fresh turkey. Technically, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) guidelines allow use of the word “fresh” only when turkey has never been stored a temperature below 26°F (-3°C). (Otherwise, the term “frozen” or “previously frozen” would be required.) Additives like sodium erythorbate, MSG, and salt are not allowed on fresh turkey, and that’s a major health advantage for you.

QUOTE FOR THE WEEKEND:

“Cardiac arrest is reversible in most victims if treated within a few minutes. It’s critical to recognize the symptoms and act quickly.” 

THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION