Archive | September 2014

How there is a link between Obesity & Cancer Part 1

The problem with being overweight or obese, as measured by weight and height, is that it raises our risk of chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease.  But did you know that being obese can actually increase our risk of getting cancer and may even worsen our chances of surviving after a cancer diagnosis?  In fact, the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II showed significant increases in cancer occurrence in people who are the most overweight.  This link is stronger in some cancer types –including breast cancer after menopause, and cancers of the colon and rectum, pancreas, kidney, esophagus, and endometrium — and can be associated with a major increase in risk.

Being obese appears to be a problem for cancer survivors as well.  Studies have shown worse survival for obese women with breast cancer; obese men with prostate cancer are more likely to have an aggressive form of cancer and it is more likely to come back after surgery.  In light of this more recent data, the American Cancer Society recently released new healthy living guidelines for cancer survivors.

The relationship between body weight and cancer becomes more alarming when we consider just how many people in the United States are overweight or obese. Today, only 1/3 of adults are at a healthy body weight for their height. Another 1/3 are considered “overweight” and the remaining 1/3 are in the “obese” category. (About 17 % of children and adolescents are obese).  These rates are 300% higher than in 1980.)

AMERICA wake up we have to turn this around for the better unless we don’t care about making this the home of the best country to live in a better one for all. We need to get healthier people especially if you have a condition, illness or disease that will let you but always get clearance by your doctor before making changes; to maintain your safety.

In a few years, obesity will replace smoking as the number one preventable cause of many common cancers, according to Professor Jeffrey M. P. Holly, Ph.D. With a grant from American Institute of Cancer Research (AICR), Professor Holly is examining how fatty acids affect the actions of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), which may promote cancer. He is also looking at two phytochemicals that may interfere with the actions of IGFs and form part of a diet to prevent cancer.

Obesity results from a long-term energy imbalance that increases a person’s storage of fat and circulating levels of fatty acids. These higher levels of fatty acids can cause resistance to insulin, which is a hormone essential to regulating the body’s metabolism. Insulin resistance has been associated with the development of diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers. IGFs work in the body in a similar way to insulin. For a long time, Professor Holly, a Clinical Sciences Professor at the University of Bristol, U.K., has studied how these similar substances affect metabolic conditions such as diabetes. But for the past few years – as more recent research has shown that IGFs may be an important risk factor for colon, prostate and premenopausal breast cancer – he has looked at how obesity increases cancer risk through effects upon secretion and action of insulin and IGFs. Recently, he and his research colleagues realized that “no one had looked at what effect eating fatty foods has on IGFs, especially now that we know that IGFs may be related to nutrition-dependent cancers.” Focus on Two Fatty Acids With funding from AICR (American Institute of Cancer Research), Dr. Holly and his research team have begun a series of experiments on malignant and healthy breast cells. They will see what impact the most abundant circulating fatty acids – palmitate and oleate – have on these cells by way of the production and activity of IGFs. Palmitate is a saturated fatty acid, while oleate is an unsaturated fatty acid. “We’re looking at three aspects of these cells’ functions: their metabolism, their growth and their survival,” said Dr. Holly. “For cancer to develop, cell growth and survival are critical.” Normally, when a cell becomes damaged, it is genetically programmed to die prematurely.  This process is called apoptosis. IGFs, however, interfere with apoptosis. “IGFs are known to be the most potent, powerful signal in the body telling the cells not to commit suicide,” said Dr. Holly. “If there is too strong an IGF signal in the body, damaged cells may live and grow into tumors. That’s the most plausible link between high IGF levels and high rates of some cancers.” Palmitate and oleate are known to affect insulin-related metabolic conditions differently. Palmitate appears to make the body more resistant to insulin, while oleate reduces resistance to insulin. But it is too early in Dr. Holly’s two-year experiment to know how the two fatty acids affect actions of IGF. The Flavonoid Effect As part of his AICR-funded project, Professor Holly will see whether two flavonoids – epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), found in green tea, and luteolin, found in olive oil – affect the growth of both the malignant and healthy cells. He will expose the cells to the flavonoids under various conditions to determine how strong their influence is. Professor Holly chose to examine flavonoids as possible cancer-preventive agents in this obesity-related study because the fat we consume is not our body’s only source of fatty acids. Our bodies have the ability to make some of their own fatty acids when needed. In fact, certain cancers, like breast cancer, tend to make huge amounts in order to maintain their growth rate. Flavonoids are known to inhibit this process. This inhibition may partly explain why a diet high in vegetables and fruits protects against cancer in many studies. Professor Holly suggests that the benefits of eating a lot of vegetables and fruits may be negated by a high-fat diet, because there would be a surplus of fatty acids to feed cells. Although his research project is in a preliminary stage, the investigation is important because it could show how certain diets, especially those low in fat, can help prevent cancer. His study may also demonstrate that some diets may be more beneficial for people undergoing cancer treatment. “Most treatments, like radiation therapy and chemotherapy, encourage cancer cells to die,” said Dr. Holly. “If we can manipulate the environment within the body to make cell death easier, these therapies may be more effective. One way to do this may be to turn off some of the signals from IGFs that encourage malignant cells to survive.”

Obesity is associated with increased risks of the following cancer types,&possibly others as well:

Esophagus/Pancreas/Colon and rectum/Breast (after menopause) /Endometrium (lining of the uterus)/Kidney/Thyroid/Gallbladder

One study, using NCI Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data, estimated that in 2007 in the United States, about 34,000 new cases of cancer in men (4 percent) and 50,500 in women (7 percent) were due to obesity. The percentage of cases attributed to obesity varied widely for different cancer types but was as high as 40 percent for some cancers, particularly endometrial cancer and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

A projection of the future health and economic burden of obesity in 2030 estimated that continuation of existing trends in obesity will lead to about 500,000 additional cases of cancer in the United States by 2030. This analysis also found that if every adult reduced their BMI by 1 percent, which would be equivalent to a weight loss of roughly 1 kg (or 2.2 lbs) for an adult of average weight, this would prevent the increase in the number of cancer cases and actually result in the avoidance of about 100,000 new cases of cancer.

Smoking, simple facts with the consequences you may face.

Through an accurate reference the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who wants to save lives and protect people, support the following:

Smoking is estimated to increase the risk—

    • For coronary heart disease by 2 to 4 times1,6
    • For stroke by 2 to 4 times1
    • Of men developing lung cancer by 25 times1
    • Of women developing lung cancer by 25.7 times1

Smoking causes diminished overall heath, such as self-reported poor health, increased absenteeism from work, and increased health care utilization and cost.

Smokers are at greater risk for diseases that affect the engine of the body=The heart and its branches=The circulatory system (putting a smoker at high risk for cardiovascular disease).

  • Smoking causes stroke and coronary heart disease—the leading causes of death in the United States.
  • Even people who smoke fewer than five cigarettes a day can have early signs of cardiovascular disease.
  • Smoking damages blood vessels and can make them thicken and grow narrower. This makes your heart beat faster and your blood pressure go up. Clots can also form.
  • A heart attack occurs when a clot blocks the blood flow to your heart. When this happens, your heart cannot get enough oxygen causing starvation of food, being oxygen to the heart tissue. This damages the heart muscle, and part of the heart muscle can die, which is what exactly happens with a heart attack where angina (lack of 02 is reversible).
  • A stroke occurs when a clot blocks the blood flow to part of your brain or when a blood vessel in or around your brain bursts causing again starvation of food, being 02, just in a different tissue part. Get it oxygen is the food to all our tissues of the body
  • Blockages caused by smoking can also reduce blood flow to your skin and legs (For example Peripheral Vascular Disease= PVD). Ever see the commercial with a person telling you to stop smoking with fingers surgically removed or limbs, PVD is what occurred to that individual and the person didn’t stop smoking. Due to this behavior what happened the vessels of the individual’s limbs became so narrowed that it cut off oxygenated blood supply to those tissue parts causing ischemia-lack of oxygen, which led to necrosis of the tissue (death) and the part had to be surgi-cally removed. Now that individual can’t walk or grasp things with those limbs that were operated on. Is smoking worth this consequence? I don’t think so, what about you? Just think about it if you still smoke.Smoking can cause lung disease by damaging your airways and the small air sacs (alveoli) found in your lungs. What actually happens to the lung tissue is the pin point openings (alveoli) keeps expanding to a wider opening. The alveoli is responsible of oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange when we inhale and exhale but with the alveoli stretched the exchange of the gases gets poor.
  • Smoking effects the transmission of the body=The Lungs
  • Lung diseases caused by smoking include COPD, which includes emphysema (especially) and chronic bronchitis.
  • Cigarette smoking causes most cases of lung cancer.
  • If you have asthma, tobacco smoke can trigger an attack or make an attack worse.1,2
  • Smokers are 12 to 13 times more likely to die from COPD than nonsmokers.

Smoking can cause cancer in almost every area of the body. If nobody smoked, one of every three cancer deaths in the United States would not happen. Smoking increases risk of dying from cancer and other diseases in cancer patients and survivors.

For those who quit smoking what risks you reduce:

  • Quitting smoking cuts cardiovascular risks. Just 1 year after quitting smoking, your risk for a heart attack drops sharply.2
  • Within 2 to 5 years after quitting smoking, your risk for stroke could fall to about the same as a nonsmoker’s.2
  • If you quit smoking, your risks for cancers of the mouth, throat, esophagus, and bladder drop by half within 5 years.2
  • Ten years after you quit smoking, your risk for lung cancer drops by half.

Again, if you smoke you may want to consider stopping; give it a thought.

 

What is stress and its effects on our Health.

One way of looking at life is whatever challenges come your way know you will survive and for any losses you may experience when looking back on them take the positive aspects or memories, not the negative that builds a bad effect on you (Ex. Insomnia to depression to high blood pressure to alcoholism to drugs).   A positive effect can be as simple as a smile when reflecting memories, which FYI allows less frowning that will cause less wrinkles on the forehead, as we get older. Sometimes it’s not that simply and when it gets harder take up a constructive way of dealing with it (Ex. Work out at your level, walking, singing, go to a comedy movie, get together with friends go out, and do anything that gets your mind off of the stress and even out of your body through work out at the gym to just biking or walking.).

For starters stress is a body reaction to CHANGE. How to you look at change? Easy, positive! It may not appear easy at first but try to look at this change as a sense of difficulty yet a challenge with a victory in the end, if approached right. Let us take the following challenges, for example –

-Having a child leave home for college or marriage, losing a home with this economy, a loss of a friend in your life: How do you look at these experiences positively? Well for the child I would be so happy for her or him starting college life with my worries but know I raised her or him well and if he makes mistakes on the way he will learn to get up off the ground and fix them knowing he can come to me or dad whenever he has the need or if we sense a problem we would address it (Its part of life=growing up).

-Another aspect to look at regarding this stress is there is loss in the parent role so fill up that loss with a new hobby, or get active in whatever organization you are in (Ex. Church, Temple, School, to just taking up ceramics or do more traveling with your spouse and friends).  I had my falls with the stresses that I have come across but got up every time to stand again, some quicker than other times.

-How do you deal with losing a home with this economy? Appreciate the good memories you had when you had the home and pick up starting a new life elsewhere with making it a journey down the yellow brick road leading you to where the rainbow is at the end; don’t look at it as a loss. Dealing with losing a friend, again, the way I look at it is I appreciate the time I had with her or him and know they haven’t left me in spirit (if deceased).   If the person is still living know there are reasons for everything; whatever the cause was for the reason for the relationship parting and when out of my control I think of how I had a good friendship as opposed to never having one with that individual. I accept that nothing lasts forever or indefinitely, with appreciating the time I may have had with the person. Ending note is I look at life this way, whatever positive entity comes in my life may be taken away from me and appreciate every moment you spend with that person or thing in your life that you love so much (including my life span that only upstairs knows how long that time factor will be but I try to live a life at its healthiest optimal level with practicing positive behavior which is knowing whatever stressors come my way there is always someone worse off).

If I don’t deal with stress like this than I can expect complications that may arise, just like for anyone else who looks at challenges coming their way in a negative sense. You commonly see stress become a neg- ative experience when a person faces continuous challenges/stressors without relief or relaxation between the them. The ending result is the person becomes overworked and stress-related tension builds. Stress that continues without positive resolution at some level can cause a condition called distress, which is a negative stress reaction. The physical reactions that happen to your body due to negative stress:

-Elevated high blood pressure –Headaches –Chest Pain –Upset Stomach  –Insomnia –Grinding of the teeth –Jaw Tension –Teeth grinded down      –Irritability –Anger –Panic episodes –Vasoconstriction to our vessels  causing increases to the heart rate –Decreases sex drive –Depression (Research even suggests that stress also can bring on or worsen certain symptoms or diseases.)

 

Stress costs American industry more than $300 billion annually.                                                             The lifetime prevalence of an emotional disorder is more than 50%, often due to chronic, untreated stress reactions.

 

Stress is a normal part of life. Many events that happen to you and around you — and many things that you do yourself (Ex. Work 40 to 60 hrs a week in a highly stressful job, like a policeman) – will put stress on your body. You can experience stress from your environment, your body, and your thoughts. You can also cause the stress to impact your body with first just signs and symptoms (s/s) developing, that are listed above, but without relief of the stress these s/s can lead you into a disease/illness forming or even make the diagnose (s) you already have even worse.

Many signs and symptoms pick up when exposed to continual stress or stresses that just build up on top of each other causing some people in developing unhealthy habits, poor dieting, and the lack of desire to be as active as they were which in turn develops conditions that would not have occurred if this negative behavior didn’t happen over a long period of time.

This behavior with the stress or stresses you are experiencing increases the probability of health conditions starting to take place in your body or if you’re with certain diagnoses already the stress can possibly impact your body by worsening the condition.   The conditions that can develop from any age of being under continual stress over a period of time are:

-ADD or ADHD –Panic disorders –High blood pressure –Anti-arrhythmias -Cardiac Disease -Diabetes 1 or Diabetes 2 -Stroke –Irritable Bowel Syndrome –Weight Gain/Obesity –Fibromyalgia –Complex Regional Pain Syndrome –ETOH -Depression and so much more.

 How to bypass developing conditions that can be caused from the long constant stress or stresses you experience? One method is fight back (fight or flight), and when it gets really difficult don’t turn to bad heath patterns in your life to deal with the stressors turn to a healthy diet, keeping a healthy weight for your body mass index (BMI) so you can deal better with fighting the stressors in your life (if not sure what your BMI is check online to find out how to calculated it, it is for free), and practice healthy habits. You may be saying how to I even go about that or maybe it’s easy for me but not true. Let me shine some light on this topic. I was there many times before and found a resolution to help deal better with my stresses through a change in eating and I lost 22 lbs. and still I am trying with being physically challenged at this moment to get to my optimal shape. If you want to check out how to deal effectively with your stress and live a healthier life for prevention of complications that stress can cause go to healthyusa.tsfl.com/. You will learn both through Dr. Anderson and his book “Dr. A’s habits of health” and myself, as your health coach, with how to use Medifast in your diet with certain foods you normally eat in your diet also. This will help you in dealing with stressors as well as boost up your health with losing weight and learning healthy habits in living. It is surely more than just dieting which is not only for 3mths or ½ year or even 2 years but its learning for life how to eat healthy with occasionally treating yourself to treats or favorite meals to lose weight and maintain it for life, to where it just becomes a part of your life and it doesn’t feel like dieting. It also is a program showing you behavior to learn by living healthier habits with explaining how it helps your body. Through Dr. Anderson’s book you will learn about all 4 food groups in how to eat the foods, when to eat the foods, what portion sizes to use, with learning even about diseases and illnesses that can occur through poor habits in diet, activity, and more. This program is giving you the steps that can lead you in the right pathway of how to control your life with reaching your optimal level of heath. You make the choices of what changes you want to make, no one else. There is no fee, no donations, no hacking, and no obligation on your part other than just to take a peek and see if what we can provide is what you would like. It can help you with conquering your stresses in life and reaching a healthier life which could impact even others around you especially your family and friends. If this occurs and this news spreads throughout America it would make our country much healthier which we could use for now and in the future. This is not a recruiting organization but a company that can help you and many others live a better and possibly longer life. Hope I have helped you in someway dealing with any stress in your life. Also, I hope to hear from you both with your comments on the articles you read on my blog with visiting the website in taking the right step to reach the optimal level of your heath including learning methods that help you deal the best you can with stress.

TAKE A PEEK healthyusa.tsfl.com;)

 

 

Quote for Friday:

“Herpes is a common sexually transmitted disease (STD) that any sexually active person can get. Most people with the virus don’t have symptoms. It is important to know that even without signs of the disease, it can still spread to sexual partners.”

Centers for disease control and prevention.

Top sexually transmitted diseases in America.

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) have been known to mankind for centuries. Before the advent of modern medicine, people’s lack of awareness and understanding of STDs contributed to the widespread transmission of the infections while few or no treatments were available to treat the conditions.

In medieval times, syphilis and gonorrhoea were two of the most prevalent STDs in Europe.

Some STDs can have severe, life-changing consequences; syphilis, for example, can eventually cause progressive destruction of the brain and spinal cord, leading to mental dysfunction and hallucinations, speech problems and general paresis.

It’s kind of puzzling that sexually transmitted diseases are so prevalent—particularly when you consider that you have to get pretty up close and personal to contract one. An STD is characterized by any disease that is spread by one partner to another via sexual contact, and that can be orally, vaginally, anally, or via hand to genital contact. Regardless, they are spread when one partner passes the disease-causing organism on to the other. Obviously, preventing STD transmission is first and foremost by practicing safe sex (PREVENTION) and not enough do it in America for some crazy reason hurting themselves and other people. However, if you think you might have contracted one of the most common STDs, recognizing the disease is imperative for swift treatment and preventing further spreading.

Top venereal diseases in the USA:

1-Gonorrhea

The Centers for Disease Control estimate that 700,000 new cases of Gonorrhea, or the “clap”, crop up every year. This long-term STD that is spread bacterially, affecting a female’s cervix, a male’s urethra, or the throat in both sexes, which means that it’s transmitted by vaginal, oral, and anal sex. The symptoms of gonorrhea are pretty subtle; the most noticeable being burning when urinating or a yellowish penile discharge in men.

2-Hepatitis

Sexually transmitted hepatitis is hepatitis B (or HBV), which afflicts more than 1.25 million individuals in the U.S. even though there is a vaccine. If left untreated, a Hep B infection will scar and damage the liver, causing cirrhosis and liver cancer. Unfortunately, over half of those affected show no symptoms, but those who do suffer muscle pain and fatigue, yellowing of the eyes (or jaundice), nausea, and a distended stomach.

3-Syphilis

Syphilis is a particularly sneaky STD that caused by a type bacterial infection of the genital tract, known as Treponema Pallidum. Syphilis is transmitted when direct contact is made between the small, painless sores on the mouth, rectum, vagina, or around the genitals in areas not protected by latex condoms. It can also be transmitted via infected mother to her baby during pregnancy. When there are no sores, the disease is still present. Syphilis symptoms are rare, however, the most telling are sores or lesions on and around the genitals, as well as hair loss, sore throat, fever; headache; and a white patchy skin rash.

4- Chlamydia

Like Gonorrhea, Chlamydia affects a man’s penile urethra and a woman’s cervix. However, oftentimes those who’ve contracted Chlamydia don’t show symptoms for months or even years, which explains why it’s the most common and rampant STD. If you do show symptoms, you’ll feel pain during intercourse and have a discolored, thick discharge from the vagina or penis. Transmitted via sexual penetration with an affected partner, using latex condoms can prevent transmission of this curable STD.

 5. Crabs

If you feel a creepy-crawly, itchy sensation in your genitals, you may have crabs (or public lice). They show themselves as visible eggs or lice in the coarse hair of the genital region (even if you shave it off), and they can spread to the armpits and eyebrows if left untreated. Typically transmitted via sexual contact, crabs can also be passed via contact with infested linens or clothing.

6. Human Papilloma Virus

Human Papilloma Virus (or HPV) is currently the most wide spread STD. It affects roughly three-quarters of the sexually active population and a staggering one-quarter of sexually active women, which is why there is a North American vaccine to protect young women from certain types of HPV that are linked to genital warts and cervical cancer. HPV is transmitted through genital contact—via vaginal and anal sex, and also oral sex and genital-to-genital contact. Most times HPV doesn’t show any symptoms until it’s far advanced, but genital warts as well as RRP, a condition where warts grow in the throat and eventually cause breathing difficulties are common.

7. Bacterial Vaginosis

Bacterial Vaginosis, or BV, is not always considered an STD even though it typically afflicts those of child-bearing age with multiple or new sex partners. BV occurs when healthy bacteria in the vagina overgrow and become imbalanced, causing burning and itching around the vagina and a thick, grey discharge with a strong fishy odor. Antibiotics will quickly clear up bouts of BV, but it can reoccur, leaving the victim prone to pelvic inflammatory disease, other STDs, and premature births (if pregnant).

 8. Herpes

Painful sores or lesions on your mouth or genitals may indicate herpes, a viral STD that comes in two forms HSV1 (herpes of the mouth) and HSV2 (herpes of the genitals). Herpes is transmitted skin-to-skin—for instance, from genital to genital, mouth to genital, or mouth to mouth contact with an infected individual, even when they don’t have visible sores. Even though herpes symptoms be treated with antibiotics, the virus never goes away and reoccurs typically 2 to 4 times per year.

9. Trichomoniasis

Trichomoniasis, or “trich”, often masks itself as a yeast infection or bacterial vaginosis (BV) in women with similar symptoms—including a thick, grey discharge, offensive vaginal odor, pain or burning intercourse, and itchiness. A parasitic trichomonas vaginalis infection affects the urethra and the vagina in women. It can be transmitted back and forth between sex partners (man to woman and woman to woman) via vaginal intercourse and contact. However, most men typically don’t have any symptoms.

10. HIV

HIV is transmitted via the exchange of body fluids—such as semen, vaginal secretions, blood, or breast milk. Within a month or 2 of contracting HIV, about 40 to 90-percent of those afflicted suffer from flu-like symptoms including fever, fatigue, achy muscles, swollen lymph glands, sore throat, headache, skin rash, dry cough, nausea, rapid weight loss, night sweats, frequent yeast infections (for women), cold sores, and eventually, pneumonia. Luckily, many individuals who are diagnosed early can live a long, productive life with HIV thanks to a combination of highly active anti-retroviral drug therapy, which prevents to progression to AIDS.

America choose prevention regarding these diseases before getting them or you will self inflict a big headache in your life that will not fully go away!  Why have it when you can prevent it and why be a person who can spread it in this country; it is all up to you.  Hope you make the right choice and if you do end up with it get treatment and help yourself and no one will do it for you.

 

What are genital warts?

Genital warts (or condylomata acuminata, venereal warts, anal warts and anogenital warts)

Genital warts affect both men and women and can occur at any age.

Most patients with genital warts are between the ages of 17-33 years. Genital warts are highly contagious. There is high risk of getting the infection from a single sexual contact with someone who has genital warts.

In children younger than three years of age, genital warts are thought to be transmitted by nonsexual methods such as direct manual contact. Nevertheless, the presence of genital warts in children should raise the suspicion for sexual abuse.

Up to 20% of people with genital warts will have other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

Most genital warts are caused by two specific types of the virus (HPV-6 and -11), and these HPV types are considered “low risk,” meaning they have a low cancer-causing potential. Other HPV types are known causes of premalignant changes and cervical cancers in women. HPV16, one of the “high-risk” types, is responsible for about 50% of cervical cancers. HPV types 16, 18, 31, and 45 are other known “high risk” virus types. High-risk HPV types are also referred to as oncogenic HPV types. HPV is believed to cause 100% of cases of cervical cancer..

Genital warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Over 100 types of HPVs have been identified; about 40 of these types have the potential to infect the genital area.

Most genital warts are caused by two specific types of the virus (HPV-6 and -11), and these HPV types are considered “low risk,” meaning they have a low cancer-causing potential. Other HPV types are known causes of premalignant changes and cervical cancers in women. HPV16, one of the “high-risk” types, is responsible for about 50% of cervical cancers. HPV types 16, 18, 31, and 45 are other known “high risk” virus types. High-risk HPV types are also referred to as oncogenic HPV types. HPV is believed to cause 100% of cases of cervical cancer.

The viral particles are able to penetrate the skin and mucosal surfaces through microscopic abrasions in the genital area, which occur during sexual activity. Once cells are invaded by HPV, a latency (quiet) period of months to years may occur, during which there is no evidence of infection.

Genital warts are indirectly associated with use of birth control pills due to increased sexual contact without the use of barrier protection, multiple sex partners, and having sex at an early age.

The size may range from less than one millimeter (1 mm = 0.039 inches) across to several square centimeters (1 cm = 0.39 inches) when many warts join together.

Rarely,   bleeding or urinary obstruction may be the initial problem when the wart involves the urethral opening (the opening where urine exits the body.)

There may be a history of previous or concurrent sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).In men, genital warts can infect the urethra, penis, scrotum, and rectal area. The warts can appear as soft, raised masses with a surface that can be smooth (on the penile shaft) or rough with many fingerlike projections (anal warts). Others may appear pearly, cauliflower-like, or rough with a slightly dark surface. Most lesions are raised, but some may be flat with only slight elevation above the skin surface. Sometimes lesions may be hidden by hair or in the inner aspect of the uncircumcised foreskin in males.

Diagnosis:

It is often based on findings from the history and appearance of the genital warts. Magnification of the area (colposcopy) using a scope may be necessary to see the lesions. In females, a colposcope may be used to look for lesions in the vaginal canal and on the cervix. A biopsy can be performed if the lesion appears unusual or recurs after treatment. Because genital warts essentially have no symptoms other than their appearance, there is little need for home treatment. It is important, however, to recognize that the warts exist. Be careful to prevent transmission to a sexual partner.

Treatment:

#1 before even getting genital herpes and stick PREVENTION!! Never get them.

Cryotherapy:  This technique freezes the wart using liquid nitrogen or a “cryoprobe.” It is an excellent first-line treatment because response rates are high with few side effects.

Electrodesiccation:  This technique uses an electric current to destroy the warts. It can be done in the office with local anesthesia. Of note, the resulting smoke plume may be infectious.

Surgery in some cases removing the warts.

Complete the necessary treatment as outlined by your health care practitioner

There is also alternative treatments:

*Types of medical creams prescribed and even OTC.  Again please with the all topical creams it is vital to complete the treatment as ordered by your doctor!

*Laser treatment – This treatment is used for extensive or recurrent genital warts. It may require local, regional, or general anesthesia. The laser physically destroys the HPV-induced lesion. Disadvantages include high cost, increased healing time, scarring, and potentially infectious viral particles in the air caused by the laser plume (hydrodynamics).

There is no single effective cure for removal of genital warts. A number of treatment options exist; however, no treatment is 100% effective in eliminating warts and preventing them from coming back in all patients. It also is not possible to eliminate infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) once it has occurred. Genital warts may go away on their own in about 10% to 20% of people over a period of three to four months.

Things you should also know:

  1. Because the warts themselves are infectious, avoid touching them. Do not pick or squeeze the warts.
  2. Take the necessary precautions to prevent trauma to the area, which can result in bleeding.
  3. Special laboratory tests can also be used to confirm the presence of HPV infection.
  4. A routine Pap smear should always be done in order to look for evidence of HPV infection and abnormal cells on the cervix.
  5. Sometimes, lesions are only visible with an enhancing technique called acetowhitening. This technique involves the application of 5% acetic acid solution to the area of suspicion for about 5-10 minutes. Infected areas will turn white.
  6. In women, genital warts have a similar appearance and usually occur in the moist areas of the labia minora and vaginal opening. Lesions visible on the outer genitals warrant a thorough examination of the vaginal canal, cervix, and anorectal area. Most vaginal warts occur without symptoms.
  7. Rarely, women may experience bleeding after sexual intercourse, itching, or vaginal discharge.
  8. Specific descriptions
  9. Warts in more than one area are common.
  10. Men and women with genital warts will often complain of painless bumps, itching, and discharge.
  11. Signs or genital warts: First know although genital warts are painless, they may be bothersome because of their location, size, or due to itching.
  12. Generally, about two-thirds of people who have sexual contact with a partner who has genital warts develop them within three months.
  13. Common warts are not the same as genital warts and are caused by different HPV types that infect the skin.